Dale H Clayton

Summary

Affiliation: University of Utah
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Adaptive significance of avian beak morphology for ectoparasite control
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 272:811-7. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Linking coevolutionary history to ecological process: doves and lice
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 57:2335-41. 2003
  3. pmc Host defense reinforces host-parasite cospeciation
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:15694-9. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Ecology of congruence: past meets present
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Syst Biol 53:165-73. 2004
  5. pmc Does sunlight enhance the effectiveness of avian preening for ectoparasite control?
    Jennifer A H Koop
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    J Parasitol 98:46-8. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint The role of body size in host specificity: reciprocal transfer experiments with feather lice
    Sarah E Bush
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 60:2158-67. 2006
  7. doi request reprint A hitchhiker's guide to parasite transmission: The phoretic behaviour of feather lice
    Christopher W Harbison
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Int J Parasitol 39:569-75. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Ecomorphology of parasite attachment: experiments with feather lice
    Sarah E Bush
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    J Parasitol 92:25-31. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Host specialization differentiates cryptic species of feather-feeding lice
    Jael R Malenke
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 63:1427-38. 2009
  10. pmc Community interactions govern host-switching with implications for host-parasite coevolutionary history
    Christopher W Harbison
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:9525-9. 2011

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. pmc Adaptive significance of avian beak morphology for ectoparasite control
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 272:811-7. 2005
    ..6mm break significantly more often than short overhangs. Hence, stabilizing selection will favour overhangs of intermediate length. The adaptive radiation of beak morphology should be re-assessed with both feeding and preening in mind...
  2. ncbi request reprint Linking coevolutionary history to ecological process: doves and lice
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 57:2335-41. 2003
    ..Although the ecology of body and wing lice is very similar, differences in their dispersal ability may underlie these joint differences in host specificity, population genetic structure, and coevolutionary history...
  3. pmc Host defense reinforces host-parasite cospeciation
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:15694-9. 2003
    ..Overall, our results suggest that host defense reinforces cospeciation in birds and feather lice by preventing lice from switching between hosts of different sizes...
  4. ncbi request reprint Ecology of congruence: past meets present
    Dale H Clayton
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Syst Biol 53:165-73. 2004
    ..To date, studies of parasite dispersal have been mainly inferential. A better understanding of the role of dispersal will require more direct data on dispersal frequency and distances...
  5. pmc Does sunlight enhance the effectiveness of avian preening for ectoparasite control?
    Jennifer A H Koop
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    J Parasitol 98:46-8. 2012
    ..Thus, the efficiency of preening for ectoparasite control appears to be independent of light intensity, at least in the case of mourning doves and their feather lice...
  6. ncbi request reprint The role of body size in host specificity: reciprocal transfer experiments with feather lice
    Sarah E Bush
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 60:2158-67. 2006
    ..Our results indicate that host switching is most likely between hosts of similar body size. This finding has important implications for studies of host-parasite coevolution at both the micro- and macroevolutionary scales...
  7. doi request reprint A hitchhiker's guide to parasite transmission: The phoretic behaviour of feather lice
    Christopher W Harbison
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Int J Parasitol 39:569-75. 2009
    ..The superior phoretic ability of wing lice may be related to morphological adaptations for life on wing feathers, compared to body feathers...
  8. ncbi request reprint Ecomorphology of parasite attachment: experiments with feather lice
    Sarah E Bush
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    J Parasitol 92:25-31. 2006
    ..Mandible use was a key component of attachment regardless of feather size. Attachment constraints do not appear to reinforce host specificity in this system...
  9. doi request reprint Host specialization differentiates cryptic species of feather-feeding lice
    Jael R Malenke
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 63:1427-38. 2009
    ..Together, these results suggest that selection in this cryptic species complex reflects selection across the whole genus, and that this selection, in part, contributes to the maintenance of host specialization...
  10. pmc Community interactions govern host-switching with implications for host-parasite coevolutionary history
    Christopher W Harbison
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:9525-9. 2011
    ..Body lice do not switch hosts, even where flies are present. Thus, differences in the coevolutionary history of wing and body lice can be explained by differences in host-switching, mediated by a member of the broader parasite community...
  11. ncbi request reprint Diversity of feather mites (Acari: Astigmata) on Darwin's finches
    Scott M Villa
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
    J Parasitol 99:756-62. 2013
    ..Certhidea olivacea, the smallest species, did not fit this pattern and had a disproportionately high number of mites for its body mass...
  12. ncbi request reprint Experimental test of the effect of introduced hematophagous flies on corticosterone levels of breeding Darwin's finches
    Sarah A Knutie
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Electronic address
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 193:68-71. 2013
    ..Our results suggest that the lower reproductive success of females from parasitized nests is not mediated by a physiological stress response. ..
  13. ncbi request reprint How effective is preening against mobile ectoparasites? An experimental test with pigeons and hippoboscid flies
    Waite Jessica L
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    Int J Parasitol 42:463-7. 2012
    ..Overall, we found that preening is effective against mobile hippoboscid flies, yet it does not eliminate them. We discuss the potential impact of preening on the transmission dynamics of blood parasites vectored by hippoboscid flies...
  14. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of the LouseBuster, a new medical device for treating head lice (Anoplura:Pediculidae)
    Sarah E Bush
    Department of Biology, 1400 East 257 South, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Med Entomol 48:67-72. 2011
    ..The use of heated air is appealing because it is a fast, safe, nonchemical treatment. Head lice are also unlikely to evolve resistance to desiccation, which is the apparent mode of action...
  15. doi request reprint Descriptions of eight new species of feather lice in the genus Columbicola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae), with a comprehensive world checklist
    Sarah E Bush
    Natural History Museum, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 7163, USA
    J Parasitol 95:286-94. 2009
    ..smithae (type host: Turtur brehmeri (Hartlaub)). Also, we provide a comprehensive checklist for the 88 known species of Columbicola (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) and their pigeon and dove hosts (Aves: Columbiformes)...
  16. ncbi request reprint Evolution of cryptic coloration in ectoparasites
    Sarah E Bush
    Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, 66045, USA
    Am Nat 176:529-35. 2010
    ..Other examples of the evolution of crypsis presumably exist among the 70,000 known species of ectoparasites that collectively represent five animal phyla...
  17. pmc Phylogenetic analysis of symbionts in feather-feeding lice of the genus Columbicola: evidence for repeated symbiont replacements
    Wendy A Smith
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 13:109. 2013
    ..Here we show that bacteria living in a single genus of feather lice, Columbicola (Insecta: Phthiraptera), present an exception to this typical pattern...
  18. pmc An experimental test of the effects of behavioral and immunological defenses against vectors: do they interact to protect birds from blood parasites?
    Jessica L Waite
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Parasit Vectors 7:104. 2014
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Sex-specific effects of an avian malaria parasite on an insect vector: support for the resource limitation hypothesis
    Jessica L Waite
    University of Utah, Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 0840, USA
    Ecology 93:2448-55. 2012
    ..The unanticipated effect on female survival may be explained by the fact that H. columbae also has the option of using male flies as vectors...
  20. ncbi request reprint An effective nonchemical treatment for head lice: a lot of hot air
    Brad M Goates
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Pediatrics 118:1962-70. 2006
    ..In this study we examined the effectiveness of several methods that use hot air to kill head lice and their eggs...
  21. ncbi request reprint Can antibodies against flies alter malaria transmission in birds by changing vector behavior?
    Suma Ghosh
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, UT, USA Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, UT, USA Department of Biology, Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA Electronic address
    J Theor Biol 358:93-101. 2014
    ..Understanding how host immune defenses indirectly alter disease transmission by influencing vector behavior has implications for reducing the transmission of human malaria and other vectored pathogens. ..
  22. pmc Experimental demonstration of the fitness consequences of an introduced parasite of Darwin's finches
    Jennifer A H Koop
    Biology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e19706. 2011
    ..Here we report the results of a larger scale experimental study of a single species at a single site over a single breeding season...
  23. ncbi request reprint Darwin's finches combat introduced nest parasites with fumigated cotton
    Sarah A Knutie
    Department of Biology, Univ of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Electronic address
    Curr Biol 24:R355-6. 2014
    ..downsi than control nests, and nests containing at least one gram of cotton were virtually parasite-free. Nests directly fumigated with permethrin had fewer parasites and fledged more offspring than nests treated with water. ..
  24. pmc Ecoimmunity in Darwin's finches: invasive parasites trigger acquired immunity in the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis)
    Sarah K Huber
    Biology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e8605. 2010
    ..fortis populations...
  25. ncbi request reprint When do parasites fail to speciate in response to host speciation?
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, Illinois 61820, USA
    Syst Biol 52:37-47. 2003
    ..Relative rate comparisons for the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene indicate that molecular substitution occurs about 11 times faster in lice than in their avian hosts...
  26. ncbi request reprint Dramatically elevated rate of mitochondrial substitution in lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign 61820, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 26:231-42. 2003
    ..Relative rate estimates also increase with model complexity, indicating that methods accounting for more multiple substitution estimate higher relative rates...
  27. ncbi request reprint Untangling coevolutionary history
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, Illinois 61820, USA
    Syst Biol 53:92-4. 2004
  28. pmc Genetic analysis of lice supports direct contact between modern and archaic humans
    David L Reed
    Florida Museum of Natural History, Dickinson Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:e340. 2004
    ..sapiens is required to explain the occurrence of both lineages on modern H. sapiens. Such a host switch would require direct physical contact between modern and archaic forms of Homo...
  29. ncbi request reprint Echolocation, vocal learning, auditory localization and the relative size of the avian auditory midbrain nucleus (MLd)
    Andrew N Iwaniuk
    Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta T6G 2E9, Canada
    Behav Brain Res 167:305-17. 2006
    ..This correlation between the size of a neural structure and the sensitivity of a perceptual domain parallels a similar pattern in mammals...
  30. ncbi request reprint Correlated evolution of host and parasite body size: tests of Harrison's rule using birds and lice
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign 61820, USA
    Evolution 59:1744-53. 2005
    ..Whatever the reason, Harrison's rule does not hold in body lice, possibly because selection on body size is mediated by community-level interactions between body lice...
  31. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial genes supports species groups for Columbicola (Insecta: Phthiraptera)
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, 1816 S Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 45:506-18. 2007
    ..These trees also revealed considerable structure with respect to biogeographic region and host clade association. These patterns indicated that switching of parasites between host clades is limited by biogeographic proximity...
  32. pmc Bacterial endosymbiont of the slender pigeon louse, Columbicola columbae, allied to endosymbionts of grain weevils and tsetse flies
    Takema Fukatsu
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba 305 8566, Japan
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:6660-8. 2007
    ..Possible biological roles of the symbiont are discussed in relation to the host nutritional physiology associated with the feather-feeding lifestyle...
  33. ncbi request reprint The population genetics of host specificity: genetic differentiation in dove lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)
    Kevin P Johnson
    Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Mol Ecol 11:25-38. 2002
    ..Underlying differences in dispersal biology probably explain the differences in population genetic structure that we observed between Columbicola and Physconelloides...