William G Cheadle

Summary

Affiliation: University of Louisville
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Risk factors for surgical site infection
    William G Cheadle
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 7:S7-11. 2006
  2. pmc Broad-based general surgery training is a model of continued utility for the future
    William G Cheadle
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Ann Surg 239:627-32; discussion 632-6. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint The continuing challenge of intra-abdominal infection
    William G Cheadle
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 186:15S-22S; discussion 31S-34S. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint The Veterans Affairs research program: scientific and clinical excellence relevant to veterans' healthcare needs
    William G Cheadle
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 190:655-61. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Antibiotic modulation in a clinically relevant model of chronic intraabdominal infection
    Dustin R Woods
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40206, USA
    Am Surg 72:655-60. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Decreased neutrophil response in a model of chronic intraperitoneal Klebsiella infection
    Dustin R Woods
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 8:367-76. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Endogenous IL-10 leads to impaired bacterial clearance and reduced survival in a murine model of chronic peritonitis
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Cytokine 40:207-15. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Microbial tolerance in secondary peritonitis is dose dependent
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Louisville, KY 40206, USA
    Cell Immunol 258:98-106. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint Genetic background influences natural killer cell activation during bacterial peritonitis in mice, and is interleukin 12 and interleukin 18 independent
    Melanie J Scott
    Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Cytokine 28:124-36. 2004
  10. pmc Leukotriene B4 receptor (BLT-1) modulates neutrophil influx into the peritoneum but not the lung and liver during surgically induced bacterial peritonitis in mice
    Melanie J Scott
    Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 11:936-41. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. ncbi request reprint Risk factors for surgical site infection
    William G Cheadle
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 7:S7-11. 2006
    ..Treating SSIs imposes a substantial strain on the financial resources of the health care system...
  2. pmc Broad-based general surgery training is a model of continued utility for the future
    William G Cheadle
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Ann Surg 239:627-32; discussion 632-6. 2004
    ..Our faculty includes surgeons with both broad-based and narrowly focused practices. In light of duty-hour restrictions and proposed changes in surgical training, we assessed the results of this model over an extended period...
  3. ncbi request reprint The continuing challenge of intra-abdominal infection
    William G Cheadle
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 186:15S-22S; discussion 31S-34S. 2003
    ..Adjunctive antibiotic therapy against gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes should be limited to a 7- to 10-day course, except in selected patients, such as those with inadequate source controls...
  4. ncbi request reprint The Veterans Affairs research program: scientific and clinical excellence relevant to veterans' healthcare needs
    William G Cheadle
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 190:655-61. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Antibiotic modulation in a clinically relevant model of chronic intraabdominal infection
    Dustin R Woods
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40206, USA
    Am Surg 72:655-60. 2006
    ..This model will allow future study of specific host defense mechanisms over a prolonged time period...
  6. ncbi request reprint Decreased neutrophil response in a model of chronic intraperitoneal Klebsiella infection
    Dustin R Woods
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 8:367-76. 2007
    ..Previously, we developed an infection model by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The high early mortality rate prompted a study of the effect of gentamicin on the disease course...
  7. ncbi request reprint Endogenous IL-10 leads to impaired bacterial clearance and reduced survival in a murine model of chronic peritonitis
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Cytokine 40:207-15. 2007
    ..We conclude that endogenous IL-10 is detrimental for survival and bacterial clearance in this model of chronic peritonitis...
  8. doi request reprint Microbial tolerance in secondary peritonitis is dose dependent
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center Louisville, Louisville, KY 40206, USA
    Cell Immunol 258:98-106. 2009
    ..Persistent intraabdominal bacterial infection induced dose dependent microbial tolerance in peritoneal macrophages...
  9. ncbi request reprint Genetic background influences natural killer cell activation during bacterial peritonitis in mice, and is interleukin 12 and interleukin 18 independent
    Melanie J Scott
    Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Cytokine 28:124-36. 2004
    ..This suggests a role for NKT and NK cell activation in the development of Th1 and Th2 responses during bacterial infection independently of IL-12 or IL-18...
  10. pmc Leukotriene B4 receptor (BLT-1) modulates neutrophil influx into the peritoneum but not the lung and liver during surgically induced bacterial peritonitis in mice
    Melanie J Scott
    Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 11:936-41. 2004
    ..Despite higher bacterial and PMN levels at remote sites, there was increased survival in BLT-1(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Decreased PMN activation may result in less remote organ dysfunction and improved survival...
  11. ncbi request reprint Interleukin-10 suppresses natural killer cell but not natural killer T cell activation during bacterial infection
    Melanie J Scott
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Cytokine 33:79-86. 2006
    ..These effects were not mediated by IL-12 and IL-18 alone, and reinforce a role for NK cells in remote organ dysfunction following peritonitis...
  12. doi request reprint Impact of microbial tolerance in persistent secondary Klebsiella pneumoniae peritonitis
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY, USA
    Cytokine 53:84-93. 2011
    ..Peritoneal concentrations of TNF-Ī±, IL-10 and nitric oxide (NO), as well as characteristic cell patterns, were determined. Long-term consequences of microbial tolerance were assessed by measuring survival and weight-loss...
  13. ncbi request reprint Alveolar interleukin-10 regulates neutrophil apoptosis in severely traumatized patients
    Matthias Turina
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    J Trauma 63:733-9. 2007
    ..The aim of the present study was to further characterize the association of alveolar IL-8 and IL-10 after trauma with neutrophil activation, apoptosis, and phagocytic capacity...
  14. doi request reprint Liver injury and abscess formation in secondary murine peritonitis
    Andreas M Lenz
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, Louisville, Kentucky, 40292, USA
    Inflamm Res 60:337-45. 2011
    ..To investigate liver damage and abscess formation in murine, secondary peritonitis...
  15. ncbi request reprint Vaccinia virus complement control protein increases early bacterial clearance during experimental peritonitis
    Melanie J Scott
    Departments of Surgery, and Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 4:317-26. 2003
    ..Statistical analysis was by Mann-Whitney U test for bacteriology, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for MPO and IL-12 concentrations...
  16. doi request reprint Macrophage genetic reprogramming during chronic peritonitis is augmented by LPS pretreatment
    Ziad Kanaan
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    J Surg Res 175:289-97. 2012
    ..We aimed in this study to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind microbial tolerance and the early innate immune response resolution in this model...
  17. ncbi request reprint Trauma alters alveolar effector cell apoptosis
    J Jason Hoth
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Surgery 134:631-7; discussion 637-8. 2003
    ..We hypothesize that the lung's immune response to trauma alters alveolar inflammatory cell apoptosis and may contribute to posttrauma pulmonary dysfunction...
  18. ncbi request reprint A novel model of pneumonia from intraperitoneal injection of bacteria
    Glen A Franklin
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 2nd Floor ACB, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 186:493-9. 2003
    ..In an attempt to produce peritonitis by Klebsiella, we found evidence of pneumonia on autopsy and further developed this approach as a new experimental model...
  19. ncbi request reprint Mortality in murine peritonitis correlates with increased Escherichia coli adherence to the intestinal mucosa
    Phillip T Burch
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Am Surg 70:333-41. 2004
    ..coli following nonlethal CLP. Our data indicate that E. coli plays a key role in mortality from polymicrobial peritonitis and that Proteus may be antagonistic to E. coli in murine peritonitis...
  20. ncbi request reprint Genetic background determines susceptibility during murine septic peritonitis
    Christopher J Godshall
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    J Surg Res 102:45-9. 2002
    ..We compared the immune response and bacterial eradication during CLP in two mouse strains with different susceptibilities to the lethal effects in an effort to understand alterations in tolerance...
  21. ncbi request reprint Natural killer cells participate in bacterial clearance during septic peritonitis through interactions with macrophages
    Christopher J Godshall
    Veterans Administration Medical Center and the Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Shock 19:144-9. 2003
    ..Our data suggest that NK cells participate in the early local and systemic eradication of bacteria and regulation of IL-12 during polymicrobial sepsis. These effects are likely due to their interactions with macrophages...
  22. pmc Jaks, STATs, Cytokines, and Sepsis
    Melanie J Scott
    Department of Surgery and Price Institute for Surgical Research, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 9:1153-9. 2002
  23. doi request reprint A natural immune modulator attenuates stress hormone and catecholamine concentrations in polymicrobial peritonitis
    Katie M Love
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    J Trauma Acute Care Surg 74:1411-8. 2013
    ..It may also be attenuating the systemic inflammatory response by regulating the secretion of cortisol and norepinephrine (NE)...
  24. doi request reprint Common microbial pathogens in surgical practice
    Motaz Qadan
    Price Institute of Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
    Surg Clin North Am 89:295-310, vii. 2009
    ..This article broadly describes current microbial pathogens and related issues in surgical disease...
  25. doi request reprint Resistance profiles in surgical-site infection
    Andreas M Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Future Microbiol 3:453-62. 2008
    ..The focus will be on Gram-positive organisms because of their increasing prevalence in SSIs and their high potential to develop resistance against several antibiotic agents, including vancomycin...
  26. ncbi request reprint Systemic inflammation after trauma
    Andreas Lenz
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, USA
    Injury 38:1336-45. 2007
    ..The purpose of this review is therefore to describe the immunological events after trauma and to introduce important mediators and pathways of the inflammatory immune response...
  27. ncbi request reprint Infection and organ failure in the surgical patient: a tribute to seminal contributions by Hiram C. Polk, Jr, M.D
    William G Cheadle
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Am J Surg 190:173-7. 2005
    ..This article describes surgical infections and organ failure from a historical perspective, with emphasis on Polk's contributions, and describes our current understanding of the pathophysiology of organ dysfunction in surgical patients...
  28. ncbi request reprint Endotoxin inhibits apoptosis but induces primary necrosis in neutrophils
    Matthias Turina
    Department of Surgery, The Price Institute of Surgical Research, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Inflammation 29:55-63. 2005
    ..6% in controls to 30.6%, p < 0.001). This increase in direct neutrophil necrosis following LPS activation may amplify local proinflammatory effects through less well controlled release of neutrophil contents into surrounding tissue...
  29. doi request reprint Poor outcome in bacterial peritonitis isĀ associated with dysregulated microRNAs and an increased inflammatory response
    Rebecca E Barnett
    Hiram C Polk Jr MD Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY
    Surgery 154:521-7. 2013
    ..Peritonitis is a common cause of surgical sepsis. The failure of the host to mount an appropriate immune response contributes to persistence of the infection. We investigated the role microRNAs may play in this failed immune response...
  30. ncbi request reprint Natural killer cell activation primes macrophages to clear bacterial infection
    Melanie J Scott
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Am Surg 69:679-86; discussion 686-7. 2003
    ..Macrophages are less able to clear bacteria when NK cells are depleted without activation. NK cells are therefore important in bacterial clearance through interactions with macrophages...
  31. ncbi request reprint Emergence of resistant microbes in critical care units is transient, despite an unrestricted formulary and multiple antibiotic trials
    Glen A Franklin
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 3:135-44. 2002
    ..Antimicrobial resistance data were compared among the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), medical intensive care unit (MICU), and burn unit (BNU)...
  32. ncbi request reprint Pathogenesis of posttraumatic empyema: the impact of pneumonia on pleural space infections
    J Jason Hoth
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, the Trauma Program in Surgery University of Louisville Hospital, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 4:29-35. 2003
    ..To elucidate the cause of posttraumatic empyema, preoperative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)/sputum cultures obtained from patients with posttraumatic empyema were compared with cultures obtained at the time of decortication...
  33. ncbi request reprint Enterocutaneous fistula: are treatments improving?
    John M Draus
    Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, KY, USA
    Surgery 140:570-6; discussion 576-8. 2006
    ..Review of the literature and our own 1990 study indicate a mortality rate of 5% to 20% for enterocutaneous fistula, and a healing rate of 75% to 85% after definitive surgery...
  34. doi request reprint Significant reduction in incidence of wound contamination by skin flora through use of microbial sealant
    Shirin Towfigh
    Department of Surgery at Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Arch Surg 143:885-91; discussion 891. 2008
    ..Application of skin sealant prior to incision reduces microbial contamination of the wound...
  35. ncbi request reprint New opportunities for reducing risk of surgical site infection. Roundtable discussion
    Mark A Malangoni
    Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
    Surg Infect (Larchmt) 7:S23-39. 2006