D R Carrier

Summary

Affiliation: University of Utah
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The face that sank the Essex: potential function of the spermaceti organ in aggression
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1755-63. 2002
  2. pmc Genetics of canid skeletal variation: size and shape of the pelvis
    David R Carrier
    University of Utah, Department of Biology, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 0840, USA
    Genome Res 15:1825-30. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Dynamic gearing in running dogs
    D R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 0840, USA
    J Exp Biol 201:3185-95. 1998
  4. pmc The advantage of standing up to fight and the evolution of habitual bipedalism in hominins
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e19630. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint Locomotor function of forelimb protractor and retractor muscles of dogs: evidence of strut-like behavior at the shoulder
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:150-62. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint The short legs of great apes: evidence for aggressive behavior in australopiths
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 61:596-605. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Locomotor function of the pectoral girdle 'muscular sling' in trotting dogs
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2224-37. 2006
  8. pmc The musculoskeletal system of humans is not tuned to maximize the economy of locomotion
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18631-6. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Influence of rotational inertia on turning performance of theropod dinosaurs: clues from humans with increased rotational inertia
    D R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3917-26. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Function of the oblique hypaxial muscles in trotting dogs
    M M Fife
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:2371-81. 2001

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint The face that sank the Essex: potential function of the spermaceti organ in aggression
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1755-63. 2002
    ..These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the spermaceti organ has evolved to be a weapon used in male-male aggression...
  2. pmc Genetics of canid skeletal variation: size and shape of the pelvis
    David R Carrier
    University of Utah, Department of Biology, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 0840, USA
    Genome Res 15:1825-30. 2005
    ..For pelvic shape we describe QTLs on autosome CFA 2, 3, 22, and 36. The relation of these polygenic systems to musculoskeletal function is discussed...
  3. ncbi request reprint Dynamic gearing in running dogs
    D R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 0840, USA
    J Exp Biol 201:3185-95. 1998
    ..Given the amount of work done at the knee and shoulder joints of running dogs, dynamic gearing may contribute to the economy of constant-speed running and may be important to integrated limb function...
  4. pmc The advantage of standing up to fight and the evolution of habitual bipedalism in hominins
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e19630. 2011
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Locomotor function of forelimb protractor and retractor muscles of dogs: evidence of strut-like behavior at the shoulder
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:150-62. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint The short legs of great apes: evidence for aggressive behavior in australopiths
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Evolution 61:596-605. 2007
    ..Their short legs may be indicative of persistent selection for high levels of aggression...
  7. ncbi request reprint Locomotor function of the pectoral girdle 'muscular sling' in trotting dogs
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2224-37. 2006
    ..Whether or not the functions of these extrinsic appendicular muscles in dogs characterize therian mammals or represent specializations for high-speed, economical running remains to be determined...
  8. pmc The musculoskeletal system of humans is not tuned to maximize the economy of locomotion
    David R Carrier
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18631-6. 2011
    ..This pattern may have evolved in response to selection to broaden the range of sustainable running speeds, to improve performance in motor behaviors not related to endurance locomotion, or in response to selection for both...
  9. ncbi request reprint Influence of rotational inertia on turning performance of theropod dinosaurs: clues from humans with increased rotational inertia
    D R Carrier
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3917-26. 2001
    ..To reduce rotational inertia, theropods may have run with an arched back and tail, an S-curved neck and forelimbs held backwards against the body...
  10. ncbi request reprint Function of the oblique hypaxial muscles in trotting dogs
    M M Fife
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:2371-81. 2001
    ..Hence, we suggest that the oblique hypaxial muscles of trotting dogs act to stabilize the trunk against sagittal shearing torques induced by limb retraction (fore-aft acceleration) and protraction (fore-aft deceleration)...
  11. ncbi request reprint Influence of increased rotational inertia on the turning performance of humans
    D V Lee
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3927-34. 2001
    ....
  12. doi request reprint The influence of foot posture on the cost of transport in humans
    C B Cunningham
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:790-7. 2010
    ..Given the great distances hunter-gatherers travel, it is not surprising that humans retained a foot posture, inherited from our more arboreal great ape ancestors, that facilitates economical walking...
  13. ncbi request reprint Effects of mass distribution on the mechanics of level trotting in dogs
    David V Lee
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 0840, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:1715-28. 2004
    ..Effects of trunk moments due to loading were evident when mass was added at the center of mass or at the pelvic girdle. These results suggest a functional link between appendicular and axial mechanics via action of the limbs as levers...
  14. ncbi request reprint Hypaxial muscle activity during running and breathing in dogs
    Stephen M Deban
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1953-67. 2002
    ..The redundancy and complexity of the respiratory musculature as well as the particular pattern of respiratory-locomotor coupling in quadrupedal mammals may circumvent these conflicts or minimize their impact on respiration...
  15. ncbi request reprint Functional trade-offs in the limb bones of dogs selected for running versus fighting
    T J Kemp
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 208:3475-82. 2005
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Functional trade-offs in the limb muscles of dogs selected for running vs. fighting
    B M Pasi
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Evol Biol 16:324-32. 2003
    ..We suggest that functional trade-offs that prevent simultaneous evolution of optimal performance in both locomotor and fighting abilities are widespread taxonomically...
  17. ncbi request reprint Scaling of rotational inertia in murine rodents and two species of lizard
    Rebecca M Walter
    Department of Biology, 201 South Biology Building, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:2135-41. 2002
    ....
  18. doi request reprint The cost of ventilation in birds measured via unidirectional artificial ventilation
    Jessamyn S Markley
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 155:146-53. 2010
    ..62% of total running metabolism or 0.48+/-0.21 mL O(2) (L ventilated)(-1). These results suggest that the metabolic cost of ventilation is low in birds and that it is within the range of costs reported previously for other amniotes...
  19. ncbi request reprint Ground forces applied by galloping dogs
    Rebecca M Walter
    Biology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:208-16. 2007
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Rapid acceleration in dogs: ground forces and body posture dynamics
    Rebecca M Walter
    Biology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake, UT 84112, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:1930-9. 2009
    ..Ground reaction forces also differ significantly from steady-state galloping in that almost no decelerating forces are applied while propulsive force impulses are three to six times greater...
  21. ncbi request reprint Gear ratios at the limb joints of jumping dogs
    Colin S Gregersen
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 0840, USA
    J Biomech 37:1011-8. 2004
    ..6%) of the positive external work of the limbs. These observations suggest that dynamic gearing in jumping dogs may allow the extensor muscles of the knee joint to shorten in a way that maximizes their power production...
  22. pmc Genetic basis for systems of skeletal quantitative traits: principal component analysis of the canid skeleton
    Kevin Chase
    University of Utah, Department of Biology, 257 South 1400 East, Room 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 0840, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:9930-5. 2002
    ..These systems of traits could explain the skeletal differences between divergent breeds such as Greyhounds and Pit Bulls, and even some of the skeletal transformations that characterize the evolution of hominids...
  23. pmc Interaction between the X chromosome and an autosome regulates size sexual dimorphism in Portuguese Water Dogs
    Kevin Chase
    University of Utah, Department of Biology, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Genome Res 15:1820-4. 2005
    ..Our results also can explain Rensch's Rule, which states that size is often positively correlated with the level of size sexual dimorphism...
  24. ncbi request reprint Evidence for endothermic ancestors of crocodiles at the stem of archosaur evolution
    Roger S Seymour
    Department of Environmental Biology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:1051-67. 2004
    ..We present other evidence for endothermy in stem archosaurs and suggest that some dinosaurs may have inherited the trait...
  25. ncbi request reprint The coupled evolution of breathing and locomotion as a game of leapfrog
    Steven F Perry
    Institut fur Zoologie, Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms, Universitat Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany
    Physiol Biochem Zool 79:997-9. 2006
    ..Hypaxial body wall muscles that were strictly locomotor in fish have respiratory function in amniotes, but some locomotor function remains in all groups...
  26. pmc Genetic regulation of osteoarthritis: A QTL regulating cranial and caudal acetabular osteophyte formation in the hip joint of the dog (Canis familiaris)
    Kevin Chase
    Am J Med Genet A 135:334-5. 2005