LEE A CAMPBELL

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Intrastrain and interstrain genetic variation within a paralogous gene family in Chlamydia pneumoniae
    Wasna Viratyosin
    Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, 97331 3804, USA
    BMC Microbiol 2:38. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae--an infectious risk factor for atherosclerosis?
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98155, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 2:23-32. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Semin Respir Infect 18:48-54. 2003
  4. pmc Cleavage of the N-linked oligosaccharide from the surfaces of Chlamydia species affects infectivity in the mouse model of lung infection
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357238, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 74:3027-9. 2006
  5. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease
    L A Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 4:571-9. 1998
  6. pmc Evaluation of Chlamydia pneumoniae 43- and 53-kilodalton recombinant proteins for serodiagnosis by Western Blot
    L A Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 8:1231-3. 2001
  7. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae uses the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor for infection of endothelial cells
    Mirja Puolakkainen
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 73:4620-5. 2005
  8. pmc Cleavage of the N-linked oligosaccharide from the surfaces of Chlamydia species affects attachment and infectivity of the organisms in human epithelial and endothelial cells
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 72:6699-701. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Mannose-receptor positive and negative mouse macrophages differ in their susceptibility to infection by Chlamydia species
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, Washington 98195, USA
    Microb Pathog 32:43-8. 2002
  10. pmc Retinoic acid prevents Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced foam cell development in a mouse model of atherosclerosis
    Shinn Jong Jiang
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357238, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Microbes Infect 10:1393-7. 2008

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. pmc Intrastrain and interstrain genetic variation within a paralogous gene family in Chlamydia pneumoniae
    Wasna Viratyosin
    Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, 97331 3804, USA
    BMC Microbiol 2:38. 2002
    ..Each member encodes a polypeptide with a hydrophobic domain characteristic of proteins localized to the inclusion membrane...
  2. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae--an infectious risk factor for atherosclerosis?
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98155, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 2:23-32. 2004
    ..This review focuses on the accumulating evidence that chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, a ubiquitous human respiratory pathogen, might contribute to atherosclerotic lesion progression...
  3. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Semin Respir Infect 18:48-54. 2003
    ..pneumoniae plays a role in atherogenesis. This review summarizes in vitro studies, results in animal models of C. pneumoniae infection and atherogenesis, and human intervention studies that provide some support of a mechanistic role...
  4. pmc Cleavage of the N-linked oligosaccharide from the surfaces of Chlamydia species affects infectivity in the mouse model of lung infection
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357238, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 74:3027-9. 2006
    ..The present study demonstrates that treatment of the organism with N-glycanase decreases or ablates infectivity in vivo...
  5. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease
    L A Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 4:571-9. 1998
    ..pneumoniae infection have been developed. This review summarizes the evidence for the association and potential role of C. pneumoniae in cardiovascular disease...
  6. pmc Evaluation of Chlamydia pneumoniae 43- and 53-kilodalton recombinant proteins for serodiagnosis by Western Blot
    L A Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 8:1231-3. 2001
    ..pneumoniae and C. trachomatis negative), and 1 of 12 (8%) C. pneumoniae negative, C. trachomatis positive sera. Thus, it appears that the 53-kDa protein encoded by CPn0980 has potential use for serodiagnosis of C. pneumoniae infection...
  7. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae uses the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor for infection of endothelial cells
    Mirja Puolakkainen
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 73:4620-5. 2005
    ..trachomatis serovar E or L2. These findings indicate that C. pneumoniae can utilize the M6P/IGF2 receptor and that the use of this receptor for attachment and entry differs between C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis...
  8. pmc Cleavage of the N-linked oligosaccharide from the surfaces of Chlamydia species affects attachment and infectivity of the organisms in human epithelial and endothelial cells
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 72:6699-701. 2004
    ..The present study showed that cleavage of the glycan with N-glycanase decreased the attachment and infectivity of chlamydial organisms in human epithelial and endothelial cells...
  9. ncbi request reprint Mannose-receptor positive and negative mouse macrophages differ in their susceptibility to infection by Chlamydia species
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, Washington 98195, USA
    Microb Pathog 32:43-8. 2002
    ..Further studies using this system may provide insight into the role of mannose-receptor in attachment, entry and survival of chlamydiae in macrophages...
  10. pmc Retinoic acid prevents Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced foam cell development in a mouse model of atherosclerosis
    Shinn Jong Jiang
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357238, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Microbes Infect 10:1393-7. 2008
    ..Lung infection and duration was decreased in treated mice, suggesting one mechanism by which retinoic acid reduces C. pneumoniae-accelerated foam cell lesion formation in hyperlipidemic mice...
  11. ncbi request reprint Inoculation of Chlamydia pneumoniae or Chlamydia trachomatis with ligands that inhibit attachment to host cells reduces infectivity in the mouse model of lung infection: implication for anti-adhesive therapy
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195 7238, USA
    Microbes Infect 9:1139-41. 2007
    ..Removal of the glycan decreases infectivity in vitro and in vivo. The present study demonstrates that simultaneous inoculation of chlamydial organisms and a ligand that prevents glycan binding reduces lung burden in infected animals...
  12. ncbi request reprint Chlamydial infections of the cardiovascular system
    Cho Chou Kuo
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Front Biosci 8:e36-43. 2003
    ..pneumoniae could contribute to the immunopathology of atherosclerosis; and early promising antibiotic intervention studies...
  13. pmc Efficacy of benzoxazinorifamycins in a mouse model of Chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 52:1855-8. 2008
    ..Rifalazil and six related new chemical entities all showed efficacy after one dose per day for 3 days at either 3 or 1 mg/kg of body weight...
  14. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae augments the oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced death of mouse macrophages by a caspase-independent pathway
    Kambiz Yaraei
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 353410, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 73:4315-22. 2005
    ..pneumoniae-induced death. These data suggest that C. pneumoniae kills cells by a caspase-independent pathway and that the process is potentially mediated by activation of TLR-2...
  15. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae infection increases adherence of mouse macrophages to mouse endothelial cells in vitro and to aortas ex vivo
    Naohisa Takaoka
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 76:510-4. 2008
    ..pneumoniae promotes the adherence of mononuclear phagocytes to the endothelium at the site of atherosclerotic lesion formation to promote the progression of atherosclerosis...
  16. pmc Tumor necrosis factor alpha plays a role in the acceleration of atherosclerosis by Chlamydia pneumoniae in mice
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 357238, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 73:3164-5. 2005
    ..No acceleration of atherosclerotic lesion development was observed in infected mice compared to uninfected mice, indicating that TNF-alpha plays a role in the acceleration of atherosclerosis by C. pneumoniae...
  17. pmc Retinoic acid inhibits the infectivity and growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae in epithelial and endothelial cells through different receptors
    Mirja Puolakkainen
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357238, Seattle, WA 91895, USA
    Microb Pathog 44:410-6. 2008
    ....
  18. pmc The acute phase reactant response to respiratory infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae: implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Microbes Infect 12:598-606. 2010
    ..These results suggest that acute phase reactant proteins produced in response to pulmonary infection with C. pneumoniae may contribute to the progression and destabilization of atherosclerotic lesions...
  19. ncbi request reprint Nitric oxide synthase plays a role in Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced atherosclerosis
    Brian B Chesebro
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, P O Box 357238, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Cardiovasc Res 60:170-4. 2003
    ..Altered production of nitric oxide, a known bactericidal and anti-inflammatory agent, represents one possible mechanistic link. To examine this issue, a diet-induced, hyperlipidemic mouse model of early atherosclerosis was used...
  20. ncbi request reprint Foam cell formation inhibits growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae but does not attenuate Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines
    Erwin Blessing
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Circulation 105:1976-82. 2002
    ....
  21. pmc Chlamydia pneumoniae and hyperlipidemia are co-risk factors for atherosclerosis: infection prior to induction of hyperlipidemia does not accelerate development of atherosclerotic lesions in C57BL/6J mice
    Erwin Blessing
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 70:5332-4. 2002
    ..pneumoniae did not accelerate lesion development in mice if a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet was started after infection, indicating that C. pneumoniae is a co-risk factor with hyperlipidemia for cardiovascular disease...
  22. pmc Amphiphysin IIm is required for survival of Chlamydia pneumoniae in macrophages
    Elizabeth S Gold
    Institute for Systems Biology, 1441 N 34th St, Seattle, WA 98103, USA
    J Exp Med 200:581-6. 2004
    ..Abrogation of amphiphysin IIm function results in C. pneumoniae-induced NO production and in the sterilization of the vacuole. The data suggest that C. pneumoniae retains amphiphysin IIm on the vacuole to survive within the macrophage...
  23. pmc Effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae on cellular ATP content in mouse macrophages: role of Toll-like receptor 2
    Kambiz Yaraei
    Department of Pathobiology, Box 353410, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Infect Immun 73:4323-6. 2005
    ..In contrast, no effect was observed in macrophages lacking expression of Toll-like receptor 4...
  24. doi request reprint Cultivation and laboratory maintenance of Chlamydia pneumoniae
    Lee Ann Campbell
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Curr Protoc Microbiol . 2009
    ..pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies. Slow expansion and use of a small inoculum are key to successful culture. Infectious organisms can be purified by use of Hypaque-76 gradients to titers >1 x 10(8)/ml...
  25. pmc Identification and characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae-specific proteins that activate tumor necrosis factor alpha production in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages
    Shinn Jong Jiang
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Box 357328, Seattle, WA 98195 3873, USA
    Infect Immun 76:1558-64. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that C. pneumoniae may activate macrophages through OMP2, Cpn 0980, and Cpn 0809 in addition to cHSP60 and that activation occurs via TLR2 or TLR4, Egr-1, and MAPK pathways...
  26. ncbi request reprint Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae
    Mirja Puolakkainen
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Infect Dis 187:435-40. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes...
  27. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae induces tissue factor expression in mouse macrophages via activation of Egr-1 and the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway
    Florian Bea
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash 98195, USA
    Circ Res 92:394-401. 2003
    ..In conclusion, the C pneumoniae-induced increase in TF expression in macrophages is mediated in part by Egr-1, signaling through TLR4, and activation of the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway...
  28. ncbi request reprint Chronic inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 does not alter plaque composition in a mouse model of advanced unstable atherosclerosis
    Florian Bea
    Department of Pathobiology and the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Cardiovasc Res 60:198-204. 2003
    ..The current study was designed to investigate whether administration of a Cox-2 inhibitor to older apolipoprotein E deficient (apo E-/-) mice with established lesions alters the composition and increases the stability of the lesions...
  29. ncbi request reprint Lesion progression and plaque composition are not altered in older apoE-/- mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor p55
    Erwin Blessing
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, P O Box 353410, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Atherosclerosis 176:227-32. 2004
    ..Inflammatory processes are an integral component of the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerotic lesions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is considered a primary mediator of inflammatory processes...
  30. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae pathogenesis
    Lee Ann Campbell
    J Med Microbiol 51:623-5. 2002
  31. ncbi request reprint Development potential of rifalazil and other benzoxazinorifamycins
    David M Rothstein
    ActivBiotics, Inc, 110 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421, USA
    Expert Opin Investig Drugs 15:603-23. 2006
    ..g., to treat acne). Neither rifalazil nor NCEs appear to induce the cytochrome P450 3A4, an attribute of rifampin that can result in adverse events due to drug-drug interactions...
  32. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and atherosclerosis: methodological considerations
    C C Kuo
    Circulation 105:E34. 2002

Research Grants13

  1. DISEASES OF PUBLIC HEALTH IMPORTANCE
    Lee Campbell; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The combination of diverse research and classroom environments provide a strong integrated approach to enable trainees to prepare for and deal most effectively with the impact of disease on global public health. ..
  2. CHLAMYDIA PNEUMONIAE ANTIGENS OF BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE
    Lee Campbell; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..pneumoniae specific antigens to facilitate laboratory diagnosis and virulence factors playing a role in pathogenesis to guide vaccine development or develop anti-adhesive strategies for prevention of infection. ..
  3. CHLAMYDIA PNEUMONIAE ANTIGENS OF BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE
    Lee Campbell; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The ultimate goals of these studies are to elucidating C.pneumoniae antigens contributing to pathogenesis and immunonopathologies that will direct future studies of developing measures for prevention, intervention, and diagnosis. ..
  4. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Antigens of Bilogogical Significance
    Lee Ann Campbell; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..If this organism contributes to the pathology of cardiovascular disease, identification of targets for intervention or prevention is of paramount importance to public health. ..