James E Byers

Summary

Affiliation: University of Georgia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A non-native prey mediates the effects of a shared predator on an ecosystem service
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e93969. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Host and parasite recruitment correlated at a regional scale
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA
    Oecologia 174:731-8. 2014
  3. pmc Climate and pH predict the potential range of the invasive apple snail (Pomacea insularum) in the southeastern United States
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e56812. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Using parasitic trematode larvae to quantify an elusive vertebrate host
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, U S A
    Conserv Biol 25:85-93. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint Variable direct and indirect effects of a habitat-modifying invasive species on mortality of native fauna
    James E Byers
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 91:1787-98. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Including parasites in food webs
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, 140 E Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA
    Trends Parasitol 25:55-7. 2009
  7. pmc Asymmetric dispersal allows an upstream region to control population structure throughout a species' range
    James M Pringle
    Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15288-93. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Solving cryptogenic histories using host and parasite molecular genetics: the resolution of Littorina littorea's North American origin
    April M H Blakeslee
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Mol Ecol 17:3684-96. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Using parasites to inform ecological history: comparisons among three congeneric marine snails
    April M H Blakeslee
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 89:1068-78. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Controls of spatial variation in the prevalence of trematode parasites infecting a marine snail
    James E Byers
    Departinent of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 89:439-51. 2008

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. pmc A non-native prey mediates the effects of a shared predator on an ecosystem service
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e93969. 2014
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Host and parasite recruitment correlated at a regional scale
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA
    Oecologia 174:731-8. 2014
    ..Our data ostensibly suggest that regional processes driving variation in oyster recruitment similarly affect the recruitment of one of its common parasites...
  3. pmc Climate and pH predict the potential range of the invasive apple snail (Pomacea insularum) in the southeastern United States
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e56812. 2013
    ..Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species...
  4. doi request reprint Using parasitic trematode larvae to quantify an elusive vertebrate host
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, U S A
    Conserv Biol 25:85-93. 2011
    ..We suggest that dependent linkages between the life stages of multihost parasites make them reliable predictors of host species' abundance, including hosts with abundances that are challenging to quantify directly...
  5. ncbi request reprint Variable direct and indirect effects of a habitat-modifying invasive species on mortality of native fauna
    James E Byers
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 91:1787-98. 2010
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Including parasites in food webs
    James E Byers
    Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, 140 E Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA
    Trends Parasitol 25:55-7. 2009
    ..In a recent Ecology Letters article, Lafferty et al. pose many good questions to catalyze discussions for determining when and how parasites should be incorporated into food-web analyses...
  7. pmc Asymmetric dispersal allows an upstream region to control population structure throughout a species' range
    James M Pringle
    Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15288-93. 2011
    ..Efforts to protect the upstream edge of an asymmetrically dispersing species' range are vital to conserving genetic diversity in the species...
  8. doi request reprint Solving cryptogenic histories using host and parasite molecular genetics: the resolution of Littorina littorea's North American origin
    April M H Blakeslee
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Mol Ecol 17:3684-96. 2008
    ..Our study therefore resolves not only a specific cryptogenic history, but it also demonstrates the success of our approach generally and could be used in resolving difficult invasion histories worldwide...
  9. ncbi request reprint Using parasites to inform ecological history: comparisons among three congeneric marine snails
    April M H Blakeslee
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 89:1068-78. 2008
    ..littorea. Overall, these patterns of parasitism suggest a recent invasion from Europe to North America for L. littorea and an older, natural expansion from Europe to North America for L. saxatilis and L. obtusata...
  10. ncbi request reprint Controls of spatial variation in the prevalence of trematode parasites infecting a marine snail
    James E Byers
    Departinent of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecology 89:439-51. 2008
    ..Trematode prevalence appears to be predominantly determined by local site characteristics favoring high gull abundance...
  11. ncbi request reprint Intraguild predation reduces redundancy of predator species in multiple predator assemblage
    Blaine D Griffen
    University of New Hampshire, Zoology Department, 46 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    J Anim Ecol 75:959-66. 2006
    ..5. Our study indicates that trophic structure is important in determining how the effects of predator species combine and demonstrates the utility of determining the redundancy, as well as the additivity, of multiple predator species...
  12. ncbi request reprint Poaching, enforcement, and the efficacy of marine reserves
    James E Byers
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1851-6. 2007
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Divergent induced responses to an invasive predator in marine mussel populations
    Aaren S Freeman
    Zoology Department, Rudman Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Science 313:831-3. 2006
    ..Our findings are consistent with the rapid evolution of an inducible morphological response to Hemigrapsus within 15 years of its introduction...
  14. ncbi request reprint Using ecosystem engineers to restore ecological systems
    James E Byers
    Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:493-500. 2006
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Partitioning mechanisms of predator interference in different habitats
    Blaine D Griffen
    Zoology Department, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    Oecologia 146:608-14. 2006
    ..Our study demonstrates that the strength of specific mechanisms of interference between top and intermediate predators can be quantified but cautions that these results may be habitat specific...