Cara Bohon

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Negative affect and neural response to palatable food intake in bulimia nervosa
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, 760 Westwood Plaza, Rm 27 355, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Appetite 58:964-70. 2012
  2. pmc Reward abnormalities among women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 44:585-95. 2011
  3. pmc An fMRI study of obesity, food reward, and perceived caloric density. Does a low-fat label make food less appealing?
    Janet Ng
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Appetite 57:65-72. 2011
  4. pmc Relation of reward from food intake and anticipated food intake to obesity: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, 1715 Franklin Boulevard, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 117:924-35. 2008
  5. pmc Female emotional eaters show abnormalities in consummatory and anticipatory food reward: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 42:210-21. 2009
  6. pmc Weight gain is associated with reduced striatal response to palatable food
    Eric Stice
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    J Neurosci 30:13105-9. 2010
  7. doi request reprint Reward circuitry responsivity to food predicts future increases in body mass: moderating effects of DRD2 and DRD4
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, 1715 Franklin Blvd, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Neuroimage 50:1618-25. 2010
  8. pmc Maintenance factors for persistence of bulimic pathology: a prospective natural history study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 42:173-8. 2009
  9. pmc Subtyping women with bulimia nervosa along dietary and negative affect dimensions: further evidence of reliability and validity
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 76:1022-33. 2008
  10. pmc Visual processing in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: similarities, differences, and future research directions
    Sarah K Madsen
    Imaging Genetics Center, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095 7334, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 47:1483-91. 2013

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Negative affect and neural response to palatable food intake in bulimia nervosa
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, 760 Westwood Plaza, Rm 27 355, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Appetite 58:964-70. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Reward abnormalities among women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 44:585-95. 2011
    ..To test the hypothesis that women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa show abnormal neural activation in response to food intake and anticipated food intake relative to healthy control women...
  3. pmc An fMRI study of obesity, food reward, and perceived caloric density. Does a low-fat label make food less appealing?
    Janet Ng
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Appetite 57:65-72. 2011
    ..Results suggest that hyper-responsivity of somatosensory, gustatory, and reward valuation regions may be related to overeating and that top-down processing influence reward encoding, which could further contribute to weight gain...
  4. pmc Relation of reward from food intake and anticipated food intake to obesity: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, 1715 Franklin Boulevard, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 117:924-35. 2008
    ....
  5. pmc Female emotional eaters show abnormalities in consummatory and anticipatory food reward: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 42:210-21. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Weight gain is associated with reduced striatal response to palatable food
    Eric Stice
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    J Neurosci 30:13105-9. 2010
    ..Collectively, results suggest that low sensitivity of reward circuitry increases risk for overeating and that this overeating may further attenuate responsivity of reward circuitry in a feedforward process...
  7. doi request reprint Reward circuitry responsivity to food predicts future increases in body mass: moderating effects of DRD2 and DRD4
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, 1715 Franklin Blvd, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Neuroimage 50:1618-25. 2010
    ..To determine whether responsivity of reward circuitry to food predicts future increases in body mass and whether polymorphisms in DRD2 and DRD4 moderate these relations...
  8. pmc Maintenance factors for persistence of bulimic pathology: a prospective natural history study
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 42:173-8. 2009
    ....
  9. pmc Subtyping women with bulimia nervosa along dietary and negative affect dimensions: further evidence of reliability and validity
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 76:1022-33. 2008
    ..The additional evidence for the reliability and validity of this subtyping scheme, particularly the prognostic utility, suggests it is worth additional inquiry...
  10. pmc Visual processing in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: similarities, differences, and future research directions
    Sarah K Madsen
    Imaging Genetics Center, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095 7334, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 47:1483-91. 2013
    ..We make recommendations for future studies to improve the understanding of visual processing abnormalities in AN and BDD. ..
  11. pmc Nonlinear relationships between anxiety and visual processing of own and others' faces in body dysmorphic disorder
    Cara Bohon
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Psychiatry Res 204:132-9. 2012
    ..Results suggest that anxiety symptoms in BDD may be associated with activity in systems responsible for detailed visual processing. This may have clinical implications related to heightened perceptual distortions associated with anxiety...
  12. ncbi request reprint Relations of bulimic symptom frequency and intensity to psychosocial impairment and health care utilization: results from a community-recruited sample
    Sonja T P Spoor
    Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, Oregon 97401, USA
    Int J Eat Disord 40:505-14. 2007
    ..To determine the frequency and intensity of bulimic symptoms related to psychosocial impairment and health care utilization...
  13. ncbi request reprint Reciprocal relations between rumination and bulimic, substance abuse, and depressive symptoms in female adolescents
    Susan Nolen-Hoeksema
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 116:198-207. 2007
    ..Results imply that it might be beneficial for prevention programs to target this cognitive vulnerability...
  14. pmc A meta-analytic review of depression prevention programs for children and adolescents: factors that predict magnitude of intervention effects
    Eric Stice
    Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 77:486-503. 2009
    ..Results suggest that depression prevention efforts produce a higher yield if they incorporate factors associated with larger intervention effects (e.g., selective programs with a shorter duration that include homework)...