David Wc Beasley

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas Medical Branch
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Adaptation of yellow fever virus 17D to Vero cells is associated with mutations in structural and non-structural protein genes
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
    Virus Res 176:280-4. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint Safety and immunogenicity of a chimeric vaccine for West Nile virus in aged subjects
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Galveston, TX, USA
    Expert Rev Vaccines 10:601-4. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Vaccines and immunotherapeutics for the prevention and treatment of infections with West Nile virus
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, and Galveston National Laboratory, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Immunotherapy 3:269-85. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Recent advances in the molecular biology of west nile virus
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Curr Mol Med 5:835-50. 2005
  5. pmc Envelope protein glycosylation status influences mouse neuroinvasion phenotype of genetic lineage 1 West Nile virus strains
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, Cancer Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    J Virol 79:8339-47. 2005
  6. pmc Genome sequence and attenuating mutations in West Nile virus isolate from Mexico
    David W C Beasley
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 10:2221-4. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Protection against Japanese encephalitis virus strains representing four genotypes by passive transfer of sera raised against ChimeriVax-JE experimental vaccine
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, and Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Vaccine 22:3722-6. 2004
  8. doi request reprint Development and characterization of non-glycosylated E and NS1 mutant viruses as a potential candidate vaccine for West Nile virus
    Melissa C Whiteman
    Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute for Human Infections, Immunity and Department of Pathology, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Vaccine 28:1075-83. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Mouse neuroinvasive phenotype of West Nile virus strains varies depending upon virus genotype
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 296:17-23. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint A mutation in the envelope protein fusion loop attenuates mouse neuroinvasiveness of the NY99 strain of West Nile virus
    Shuliu Zhang
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 353:35-40. 2006

Collaborators

  • ALAN DT BARRETT
  • R B Tesh
  • Li Li
  • David E Volk
  • Scott Weaver
  • Tom Solomon
  • Bruno P Granwehr
  • AARON BRAULT
  • Michael Diamond
  • Claire Y H Huang
  • San Bin Wang
  • Richard M Kinney
  • Darci R Smith
  • Stephen Higgs
  • Thomas P Monath
  • R S Lanciotti
  • Catherine H Schein
  • Mary Jane Cardosa
  • G D Ebel
  • F Guirakhoo
  • L D Kramer
  • Shuliu Zhang
  • C Todd Davis
  • Hilda Guzman
  • Melissa C Whiteman
  • Jason A Wicker
  • Evgeniy I Bovshik
  • David G Gorenstein
  • Fiona J May
  • Rodrigo A Maillard
  • Xianbin Yang
  • Eleanor Deardorff
  • Lilian Cruz
  • Roberto Navarro-Lopez
  • Ray E Parsons
  • Marina Siirin
  • Marion S Ratterree
  • Robert J Novak
  • Jose G Estrada-Franco
  • Rodrigo Maillard
  • Gregory D Gromowski
  • Kyung Min Chung
  • James C Lee
  • Matthew R Vogt
  • Theodore Oliphant
  • Michael Engle
  • Rudy Bueno
  • Yvonne Randle
  • J Ching Lee
  • LAURA CHANDLER
  • Matthew Jordan
  • Pushker Raj
  • Bruce A Luxon
  • Judith F Aronson
  • Bradley S Schneider
  • Jose Estrada-Franco
  • Arturo Campomanes-Cortes
  • He Wang
  • Norbert K Herzog
  • Sara E Woodson
  • James F Leary
  • Lee O Lomas
  • Wanichaya N Ramey
  • Mario Solis-Hernandez
  • Pedro Paz-Ramirez
  • Xu Zhao
  • Harvey Artsob
  • Gloria Suarez-Rangel
  • Darwin Elizondo-Quiroga
  • Lillian M Stark
  • Emily N Green
  • Mario V Serpas
  • David S Young
  • Ann M Powers
  • Amelia P A Travassos Da Rosa
  • Michael A Drebot
  • Robert E Fontaine
  • Mauricio Abarca
  • Roberto Flores Reyna
  • Tito Rodriguez
  • Victor M Cardenas
  • Amy Lambert
  • Robin A Gutierrez
  • Bruce J Dille
  • Thomas P Leary
  • Rudolf P Bohm
  • Larry G Bikenmeyer
  • Peter J Didier
  • Amelia P A Travassos da Rosa
  • Katherine Phillippi-Falkenstein

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. doi request reprint Adaptation of yellow fever virus 17D to Vero cells is associated with mutations in structural and non-structural protein genes
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
    Virus Res 176:280-4. 2013
    ..These studies confirm that flavivirus adaptation to growth in Vero cells can be mediated by structural or non-structural protein mutations...
  2. ncbi request reprint Safety and immunogenicity of a chimeric vaccine for West Nile virus in aged subjects
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Galveston, TX, USA
    Expert Rev Vaccines 10:601-4. 2011
    ..The apparent safety and immunogenicity of ChimeriVax-WN02 in this population indicates that further development and clinical testing are justified...
  3. doi request reprint Vaccines and immunotherapeutics for the prevention and treatment of infections with West Nile virus
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, and Galveston National Laboratory, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Immunotherapy 3:269-85. 2011
    ..This article focuses on progress in development and evaluation of vaccines and immunotherapeutics for the prevention and treatment of WNV disease in humans and animals...
  4. ncbi request reprint Recent advances in the molecular biology of west nile virus
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Curr Mol Med 5:835-50. 2005
    ..This review addresses the most recent results from studies investigating the molecular biology and evolution of WNV, as well as progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents...
  5. pmc Envelope protein glycosylation status influences mouse neuroinvasion phenotype of genetic lineage 1 West Nile virus strains
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, Cancer Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    J Virol 79:8339-47. 2005
    ..Therefore, the enhanced virulence of North American WNV strains compared with other Old World lineage 1 strains is at least partly mediated by envelope protein glycosylation...
  6. pmc Genome sequence and attenuating mutations in West Nile virus isolate from Mexico
    David W C Beasley
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 10:2221-4. 2004
    ..11%) differences from the NY99 prototype. Mouse virulence differences between plaque-purified variants of TM171-03 with mutations at the E protein glycosylation motif suggest the emergence of an attenuating mutation...
  7. ncbi request reprint Protection against Japanese encephalitis virus strains representing four genotypes by passive transfer of sera raised against ChimeriVax-JE experimental vaccine
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, and Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Vaccine 22:3722-6. 2004
    ..ChimeriVax-JE stimulated protection that was comparable or superior to the JE-VAX control...
  8. doi request reprint Development and characterization of non-glycosylated E and NS1 mutant viruses as a potential candidate vaccine for West Nile virus
    Melissa C Whiteman
    Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute for Human Infections, Immunity and Department of Pathology, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Vaccine 28:1075-83. 2010
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Mouse neuroinvasive phenotype of West Nile virus strains varies depending upon virus genotype
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 296:17-23. 2002
    ..Virus isolated in North America was found to be highly neuroinvasive with a lack of age-related resistance to infection in mice normally associated with mosquito-borne flaviviruses...
  10. ncbi request reprint A mutation in the envelope protein fusion loop attenuates mouse neuroinvasiveness of the NY99 strain of West Nile virus
    Shuliu Zhang
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 353:35-40. 2006
    ..MAb 3D9 was subsequently shown to be broadly cross-reactive with other flaviviruses, consistent with binding near the highly conserved fusion loop...
  11. ncbi request reprint Differential expression of domain III neutralizing epitopes on the envelope proteins of West Nile virus strains
    Li Li
    Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 335:99-105. 2005
    ..Mutations of residue 332 had the most significant effects on variation of domain III neutralizing epitopes among strains...
  12. pmc West Nile virus in Mexico: evidence of widespread circulation since July 2002
    Jose G Estrada-Franco
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 9:1604-7. 2003
    ..Phylogenetic studies indicate that this isolate, the first from Mexico, is related to strains from the central United States but has a relatively high degree of sequence divergence...
  13. ncbi request reprint Long range communication in the envelope protein domain III and its effect on the resistance of West Nile virus to antibody-mediated neutralization
    Rodrigo A Maillard
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 1055, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:613-22. 2008
    ..This hypothesis is consistent with reported mutations in other flaviviruses whose surfaces are not exposed for the interaction with other macromolecules, yet they confer mAb neutralization resistance...
  14. ncbi request reprint Solution structure and antibody binding studies of the envelope protein domain III from the New York strain of West Nile virus
    David E Volk
    Sealy Center for Structural Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 1147, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:38755-61. 2004
    ....
  15. pmc NMR assignments of the sylvatic dengue 1 virus envelope protein domain III
    David E Volk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 1157, USA
    Biomol NMR Assign 2:155-7. 2008
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Development pathway for biodefense vaccines
    Alan D T Barrett
    Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0436, USA
    Vaccine 27:D2-7. 2009
    ..Nonetheless, the vaccine pathway still requires the same fundamental components of basic science/discovery, preclinical development, clinical trials, registration/licensure, and a plan for implementation...
  17. pmc Role of BC loop residues in structure, function and antigenicity of the West Nile virus envelope protein receptor-binding domain III
    Shuliu Zhang
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA
    Virology 403:85-91. 2010
    ....
  18. pmc Identification of neutralizing epitopes within structural domain III of the West Nile virus envelope protein
    David W C Beasley
    WHO Collaborating Center for Tropical Diseases, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    J Virol 76:13097-100. 2002
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Current use and development of vaccines for Japanese encephalitis
    David W C Beasley
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Expert Opin Biol Ther 8:95-106. 2008
    ....
  20. pmc Solution structure of the envelope protein domain III of dengue-4 virus
    David E Volk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 1157, USA
    Virology 364:147-54. 2007
    ..Important structural differences between DEN4-rED3 and ED3 domains of DEN2, DEN3 and other flaviviruses are discussed...
  21. pmc Development of resistance to passive therapy with a potently neutralizing humanized monoclonal antibody against West Nile virus
    Shuliu Zhang
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA
    J Infect Dis 200:202-5. 2009
    ..Moreover, the emergence of resistant variants after infection with fully sensitive virus occurred but was relatively rare, even in highly immunocompromised B and T cell-deficient RAG mice...
  22. ncbi request reprint A single amino acid substitution in the central portion of the West Nile virus NS4B protein confers a highly attenuated phenotype in mice
    Jason A Wicker
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, and Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 349:245-53. 2006
    ....
  23. pmc Introductions of West Nile virus strains to Mexico
    Eleanor Deardorff
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 12:314-8. 2006
    ....
  24. pmc Use of a recombinant envelope protein subunit antigen for specific serological diagnosis of West Nile virus infection
    David W C Beasley
    Department of Pathology, UTMB, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 42:2759-65. 2004
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Limited evolution of West Nile virus has occurred during its southwesterly spread in the United States
    David W C Beasley
    WHO Collaborating Center for Tropical Diseases, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 309:190-5. 2003
    ..The presence of unique patterns of small numbers of mutations in North American West Nile strains studied to date may suggest the absence of a strong selective pressure to drive the emergence of dominant variants...
  26. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic analysis of North American West Nile virus isolates, 2001-2004: evidence for the emergence of a dominant genotype
    C Todd Davis
    Department of Pathology, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, and Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77550 0609, USA
    Virology 342:252-65. 2005
    ..The implications of these findings are discussed as they relate to transmission and spread of the virus in the Western Hemisphere...
  27. pmc Characterization of a West Nile virus isolate from a human on the Gulf Coast of Texas
    Bruno P Granwehr
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 42:5375-7. 2004
    ....
  28. pmc Genetic variation among temporally and geographically distinct West Nile virus isolates, United States, 2001, 2002
    C Todd Davis
    Center for Biodefense and Emerging Diseases, Galveston, Texas 77555 0609, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 9:1423-9. 2003
    ..35% (mean = 0.18%). These results show the geographic clustering of genetically similar WNV isolates and the possible emergence of a dominant variant circulating across much of the United States during 2002...
  29. pmc Structure of yellow fever virus envelope protein domain III
    David E Volk
    Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 1157, USA
    Virology 394:12-8. 2009
    ..Variations in the structure and surface chemistry of ED3 between flaviviruses affect neutralization sites and may affect host cell receptor interactions and play a role in the observed variations in viral pathogenesis and tissue tropism...
  30. ncbi request reprint Structure of the envelope protein domain III of Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus
    David E Volk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 1157, USA
    Virology 351:188-95. 2006
    ..Important structural differences between tick-borne flaviviruses, such as OHFV and TBE, and mosquito-borne flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus, are discussed...
  31. ncbi request reprint Natural and nosocomial infection in a patient with West Nile encephalitis and extrapyramidal movement disorders
    Tom Solomon
    Department of Pathology, University Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA and Departments of Neurological Science and Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Clin Infect Dis 36:E140-5. 2003
    ..Detailed molecular analysis suggested that, although our patient received a blood transfusion infected with WNV, the virus that caused his initial infection and encephalitis was probably acquired naturally from a mosquito...
  32. ncbi request reprint Emergence of attenuated West Nile virus variants in Texas, 2003
    C Todd Davis
    Department of Pathology, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    Virology 330:342-50. 2004
    ..These data indicate microevolution of WNV and the emergence of isolates exhibiting phenotypic variation...
  33. pmc Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus
    Fiona J May
    Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 0609, USA
    J Gen Virol 89:1901-10. 2008
    ..Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid)...
  34. pmc Origin and evolution of Japanese encephalitis virus in southeast Asia
    Tom Solomon
    Department of Neurological Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L9 7LJ, United Kingdom
    J Virol 77:3091-8. 2003
    ..Our data, together with recent evidence on the origins of other emerging viruses, including dengue virus and Nipah virus, imply that tropical southeast Asia may be an important zone for emerging pathogens...
  35. ncbi request reprint Experimental infection of rhesus macaques with West Nile virus: level and duration of viremia and kinetics of the antibody response after infection
    Marion S Ratterree
    Division of Veterinary Medicine, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University, Covington, Louisiana, USA
    J Infect Dis 189:669-76. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that both nucleic acid and serological testing may be needed to determine exposure to WNV and to identify potentially infected blood donors...
  36. pmc West Nile encephalitis
    Tom Solomon
    Department of Neurological Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L9 7LJ, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak, Malaysia
    BMJ 326:865-9. 2003
  37. ncbi request reprint Short report: serological evidence of West Nile virus activity in El Salvador
    Lilian Cruz
    Field Epidemiology Training Program, Ministry of Public Health and Social Welfare, San Salvador, El Salvador
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 72:612-5. 2005
    ..Ten of these infections were confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization tests, suggesting West Nile virus has extended its range and spread to Central America...
  38. ncbi request reprint Selection of thioaptamers for diagnostics and therapeutics
    Xianbin Yang
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas 77555 1157, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1082:116-9. 2006
    ..Moreover, some promising thioaptamers have been shown in preliminary animal therapeutic dosing to increase survival in animal models of infection with West Nile virus...
  39. ncbi request reprint 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments for domain III of the West Nile virus envelope protein
    David E Volk
    J Biomol NMR 29:445-6. 2004