TRACY BALE

Summary

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Sex differences in microRNA regulation of gene expression: no smoke, just miRs
    Christopher P Morgan
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Ste, 201E, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 6046, USA
    Biol Sex Differ 3:22. 2012
  2. pmc Antiinflammatory treatment ameliorates HPA stress axis dysfunction in a mouse model of stress sensitivity
    Alexis R Gerber
    Department of Animal Biology, Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 153:4830-7. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Stress sensitivity and the development of affective disorders
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Horm Behav 50:529-33. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Sensitivity to stress: dysregulation of CRF pathways and disease development
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology and Institute of Neuroscience, 210 E Vet, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Horm Behav 48:1-10. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Is mom too sensitive? Impact of maternal stress during gestation
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Front Neuroendocrinol 26:41-9. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint CRF and CRF receptors: role in stress responsivity and other behaviors
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 44:525-57. 2004
  7. doi request reprint Neuroendocrine and immune influences on the CNS: it's a matter of sex
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Neuron 64:13-6. 2009
  8. doi request reprint Sex differences in prenatal epigenetic programming of stress pathways
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Stress 14:348-56. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Identifying early behavioral and molecular markers of future stress sensitivity
    Nirupa Goel
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 148:4585-91. 2007
  10. doi request reprint Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of obesity
    Casey H Halpern
    Department of Neurosurgery, Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosurg 109:625-34. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications37

  1. pmc Sex differences in microRNA regulation of gene expression: no smoke, just miRs
    Christopher P Morgan
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Ste, 201E, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 6046, USA
    Biol Sex Differ 3:22. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Antiinflammatory treatment ameliorates HPA stress axis dysfunction in a mouse model of stress sensitivity
    Alexis R Gerber
    Department of Animal Biology, Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 153:4830-7. 2012
    ..The specificity of these effects in a stress-sensitive genotype highlights the importance of utilizing a model of stress dysregulation in the examination of factors that may translate to neuropsychiatric disease...
  3. ncbi request reprint Stress sensitivity and the development of affective disorders
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Horm Behav 50:529-33. 2006
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Sensitivity to stress: dysregulation of CRF pathways and disease development
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology and Institute of Neuroscience, 210 E Vet, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Horm Behav 48:1-10. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Is mom too sensitive? Impact of maternal stress during gestation
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Front Neuroendocrinol 26:41-9. 2005
    ..Using this model, altered stress responsivity in offspring appears to require both a genetic predisposition to stress sensitivity and a postnatal environment that influences it...
  6. ncbi request reprint CRF and CRF receptors: role in stress responsivity and other behaviors
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 44:525-57. 2004
    ..The development of disorders related to heightened stress sensitivity and dysregulation of stress-coping mechanisms appears to involve regulatory mechanisms of CRF family members...
  7. doi request reprint Neuroendocrine and immune influences on the CNS: it's a matter of sex
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Neuron 64:13-6. 2009
    ..Yet surprisingly, we have considered very little the contribution of the sexually dimorphic brain when thinking about disease etiology and the important influences of the neuroendocrine and immune systems in programming the CNS...
  8. doi request reprint Sex differences in prenatal epigenetic programming of stress pathways
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Stress 14:348-56. 2011
    ..This review discusses the association and possible contributing mechanisms of prenatal stress in programming offspring stress pathway dysregulation and the importance of sex...
  9. ncbi request reprint Identifying early behavioral and molecular markers of future stress sensitivity
    Nirupa Goel
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 148:4585-91. 2007
    ..We conclude that identification of abnormal pubertal stress pathway maturation may be predictive of adult heightened stress sensitivity and future susceptibility to stress-related affective disorders...
  10. doi request reprint Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of obesity
    Casey H Halpern
    Department of Neurosurgery, Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosurg 109:625-34. 2008
    ..The authors conclude that deep brain stimulation should be strongly considered as a promising therapeutic option for patients suffering from refractory obesity...
  11. ncbi request reprint Impact of prenatal stress on long term body weight is dependent on timing and maternal sensitivity
    Bridget R Mueller
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Physiol Behav 88:605-14. 2006
    ..Results from these studies support our hypothesis that the ultimate effect of prenatal stress on offspring long-term outcome is dependent on the timing of exposure and maternal sensitivity...
  12. pmc Sex-specific programming of offspring emotionality after stress early in pregnancy
    Bridget R Mueller
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosci 28:9055-65. 2008
    ..Overall, these results indicate that stress experience early in pregnancy may contribute to male neurodevelopmental disorders through impacts on placental function and fetal development...
  13. pmc Failure to mount adaptive responses to stress results in dysregulation and cell death in the midbrain raphe
    Jonathan G McEuen
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    J Neurosci 28:8169-77. 2008
    ..These results support a requirement for homeostatic maintenance in response to stress in the raphe, where dysregulation may be a critical predictor of affective disorder onset...
  14. doi request reprint Stress and sex influences on food-seeking behaviors
    Diana E Pankevich
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 16:1539-44. 2008
    ..As females show heightened stress sensitivity and present with increased rates of obesity, we hypothesized that stress-induced increases in the motivation for preferred foods may be a sex-specific predisposing factor for weight gain...
  15. pmc Maternal high-fat diet promotes body length increases and insulin insensitivity in second-generation mice
    Gregory A Dunn
    University of Pennsylvania, Department of Animal Biology, 201E Vet, 6046, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    Endocrinology 150:4999-5009. 2009
    ....
  16. pmc Effects of stress on dietary preference and intake are dependent on access and stress sensitivity
    Sarah L Teegarden
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States
    Physiol Behav 93:713-23. 2008
    ..Based on the alterations in caloric efficiency, increases in stress sensitivity may further predispose an organism toward altered energy balance in times of stress...
  17. pmc Delta FosB-mediated alterations in dopamine signaling are normalized by a palatable high-fat diet
    Sarah L Teegarden
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6046, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 64:941-50. 2008
    ..We hypothesized that a dysregulation in dopamine signaling might be an underlying cause of heightened reward sensitivity whereby rewarding stimuli could act to normalize the system...
  18. ncbi request reprint Early prenatal stress impact on coping strategies and learning performance is sex dependent
    Bridget R Mueller
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 201E Vet School, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States
    Physiol Behav 91:55-65. 2007
    ....
  19. pmc Early life programming and neurodevelopmental disorders
    Tracy L Bale
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    Biol Psychiatry 68:314-9. 2010
    ....
  20. pmc Vital functions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) pathways in maintenance and regulation of energy homeostasis
    Kendall M Carlin
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 19104, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:3462-7. 2006
    ..These studies provide physiological, biochemical, and behavioral evidence for the critical participation of CRF pathways in the maintenance and adaptive responses necessary for regulation of energy homeostasis...
  21. pmc Sex differences in the serotonergic influence on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis
    Nirupa Goel
    School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 151:1784-94. 2010
    ..These studies support a potential for sex-specific involvement of 5-HT and stress pathways in the etiology of affective disorders...
  22. pmc Influence of sex and corticotropin-releasing factor pathways as determinants in serotonin sensitivity
    Jonathan G McEuen
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 150:3709-16. 2009
    ..This sensitivity to 5-HT-mediated anxiety in females may underlie a heightened vulnerability to stress-related affective disorders...
  23. pmc Prenatal stress programming of offspring feeding behavior and energy balance begins early in pregnancy
    Diana E Pankevich
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States
    Physiol Behav 98:94-102. 2009
    ..These studies suggest that the long-term effects of stress during pregnancy on programming of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis begin much earlier in development than previously thought...
  24. pmc Maternal high-fat diet effects on third-generation female body size via the paternal lineage
    Gregory A Dunn
    Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    Endocrinology 152:2228-36. 2011
    ....
  25. pmc Androgenic influence on serotonergic activation of the HPA stress axis
    Nirupa Goel
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 152:2001-10. 2011
    ..These data support brain region-specific regulation of the HPA axis where sex differences may be mediated partly through androgen enhancement of signaling in inhibitory regions...
  26. pmc Organizational and activational effects of testosterone on masculinization of female physiological and behavioral stress responses
    Nirupa Goel
    University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Endocrinology 149:6399-405. 2008
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint Decreases in dietary preference produce increased emotionality and risk for dietary relapse
    Sarah L Teegarden
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6046, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 61:1021-9. 2007
    ....
  28. pmc Dysregulated editing of serotonin 2C receptor mRNAs results in energy dissipation and loss of fat mass
    Yukio Kawahara
    The Wistar Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosci 28:12834-44. 2008
    ..Our results highlight the importance of regulated 5-HT(2C)R mRNA editing, because dysregulation could result in the pathological consequences such as growth retardation seen in VGV mice...
  29. ncbi request reprint Mice deficient for both corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) and CRFR2 have an impaired stress response and display sexually dichotomous anxiety-like behavior
    Tracy L Bale
    Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA
    J Neurosci 22:193-9. 2002
    ..These results indicate that both CRFR1 and CRFR2 have critical roles in gene regulation and the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress...
  30. ncbi request reprint Stress and disease: is being female a predisposing factor?
    Jill B Becker
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    J Neurosci 27:11851-5. 2007
  31. ncbi request reprint Elevated stress sensitivity in corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 deficient mice decreases maternal, but not intermale aggression
    Stephen C Gammie
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, 1117 West Johnson St, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Behav Brain Res 160:169-77. 2005
    ..Taken together, the results suggest that differences in stress sensitivity and the overproduction of CRF of the knockout (KO) mice specifically affects maternal, but not intermale aggression...
  32. pmc The cardiovascular physiologic actions of urocortin II: acute effects in murine heart failure
    Tracy L Bale
    Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037 1099, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:3697-702. 2004
    ..These results demonstrate the potent cardiovascular physiologic actions of UcnII in both wild-type and cardiomyopathic mice and support a potential beneficial use of this peptide in therapy of congestive heart failure...
  33. ncbi request reprint Increased depression-like behaviors in corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2-deficient mice: sexually dichotomous responses
    Tracy L Bale
    Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA
    J Neurosci 23:5295-301. 2003
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2-deficient mice display abnormal homeostatic responses to challenges of increased dietary fat and cold
    Tracy L Bale
    The Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA
    Endocrinology 144:2580-7. 2003
    ..These results demonstrate that CRFR2 plays a critical role in regulation of energy expenditure and is important for responses to homeostatic challenges...
  35. ncbi request reprint A new role for corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2: suppression of vascularization
    Tracy L Bale
    Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute, 10010 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
    Trends Cardiovasc Med 13:68-71. 2003
    ..These results suggest that CRFR2 is a critical component of a novel pathway necessary for tonic inhibition of adult neovascularization, and that CRFR2 may be a potential target for therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis...
  36. pmc Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 is a tonic suppressor of vascularization
    Tracy L Bale
    Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, The Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:7734-9. 2002
    ..CRFR2 may be a potential target for therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis in cancer and ischemic cardiovascular disease...
  37. pmc Urocortin2 inhibits tumor growth via effects on vascularization and cell proliferation
    Zhengrong Hao
    Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:3939-44. 2008
    ..These results establish that Ucn2 inhibits tumor growth, suggesting a potential therapeutic role for CRFR2 ligands in clinical malignancies...

Research Grants8

  1. Actions of CRF on 5-HT pathways in mood regulation
    TRACY BALE; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..We hypothesize that results from these proposed studies will demonstrate an involvement of a dysregulation of CRF pathways in alterations in 5-HT neurotransmission leading to a predisposition to stress-related mood disorders. ..
  2. Early Gestation as a Sensitive Period to Stress in Sex-Dependent Neurodevelopment
    Tracy L Bale; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  3. Early pregnancy stress programming of offspring emotionality
    Tracy L Bale; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  4. Actions of CRF on 5-HT pathways in mood regulation
    Tracy L Bale; Fiscal Year: 2011
    ....