Anthony Back

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Approaching difficult communication tasks in oncology
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
    CA Cancer J Clin 55:164-77. 2005
  2. pmc Values and options in cancer care (VOICE): study design and rationale for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for physicians, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers
    Michael Hoerger
    Rochester Healthcare Decision Making Group, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
    BMC Cancer 13:188. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint How should physicians communicate the transition to palliative care?
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Oncol 2:136-7. 2005
  4. pmc How oncology fellows discuss transitions in goals of care: a snapshot of approaches used prior to training
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 13:395-400. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Patient-physician communication in oncology: what does the evidence show?
    Anthony Back
    University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Oncology (Williston Park) 20:67-74; discussion 77-8, 83. 2006
  6. pmc Compassionate silence in the patient-clinician encounter: a contemplative approach
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 12:1113-7. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Discussing prognosis: "how much do you want to know?" talking to patients who are prepared for explicit information
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 24:4209-13. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Discussing prognosis: "how much do you want to know?" talking to patients who do not want information or who are ambivalent
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 24:4214-7. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions to palliative care
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine Oncology, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, PO Box 19023, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Arch Intern Med 167:453-60. 2007
  10. pmc Abandonment at the end of life from patient, caregiver, nurse, and physician perspectives: loss of continuity and lack of closure
    Anthony L Back
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:474-9. 2009

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications37

  1. ncbi request reprint Approaching difficult communication tasks in oncology
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
    CA Cancer J Clin 55:164-77. 2005
    ....
  2. pmc Values and options in cancer care (VOICE): study design and rationale for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for physicians, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers
    Michael Hoerger
    Rochester Healthcare Decision Making Group, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
    BMC Cancer 13:188. 2013
    ..This article describes an investigation designed to facilitate communication and decision making among oncologists, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers...
  3. ncbi request reprint How should physicians communicate the transition to palliative care?
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Oncol 2:136-7. 2005
  4. pmc How oncology fellows discuss transitions in goals of care: a snapshot of approaches used prior to training
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 13:395-400. 2010
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Patient-physician communication in oncology: what does the evidence show?
    Anthony Back
    University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Oncology (Williston Park) 20:67-74; discussion 77-8, 83. 2006
    ..Existing research provides a great deal of descriptive data about patient-oncologist communication, although intervention studies that link communication to patient outcomes are much less common...
  6. pmc Compassionate silence in the patient-clinician encounter: a contemplative approach
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 12:1113-7. 2009
    ..We describe a typology of silences, and describe a type of compassionate silence, derived from contemplative practice, along with the mental qualities that make this type of silence possible...
  7. ncbi request reprint Discussing prognosis: "how much do you want to know?" talking to patients who are prepared for explicit information
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 24:4209-13. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Discussing prognosis: "how much do you want to know?" talking to patients who do not want information or who are ambivalent
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Clin Oncol 24:4214-7. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions to palliative care
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine Oncology, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, PO Box 19023, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Arch Intern Med 167:453-60. 2007
    ..This study evaluated the efficacy of Oncotalk in changing observable communication behaviors...
  10. pmc Abandonment at the end of life from patient, caregiver, nurse, and physician perspectives: loss of continuity and lack of closure
    Anthony L Back
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:474-9. 2009
    ..Surveys and anecdotes suggest that patients and family members sometimes feel abandoned by their physicians at the transition to end-of-life care. To our knowledge, no prior studies describe abandonment prospectively...
  11. ncbi request reprint On saying goodbye: acknowledging the end of the patient-physician relationship with patients who are near death
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Ann Intern Med 142:682-5. 2005
  12. ncbi request reprint Dealing with conflict in caring for the seriously ill: "it was just out of the question"
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
    JAMA 293:1374-81. 2005
    ..We outline a step-wise approach that physicians can use to deal with conflicts and the use of treatment trials as a strategy to address conflicts about the use of life-sustaining medical interventions...
  13. pmc Communication about cancer near the end of life
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Cancer 113:1897-910. 2008
    ....
  14. pmc What patients value when oncologists give news of cancer recurrence: commentary on specific moments in audio-recorded conversations
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Oncologist 16:342-50. 2011
    ..Recommendations for communicating bad or serious news are based on limited evidence. This study was designed to understand patient perspectives on what patients value when oncologists communicate news of cancer recurrence...
  15. ncbi request reprint Hope for the best, and prepare for the worst
    Anthony L Back
    Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System, University of Washington, 1660 South Columbian Way S111, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    Ann Intern Med 138:439-43. 2003
  16. ncbi request reprint Clinician-patient interactions about requests for physician-assisted suicide: a patient and family view
    Anthony L Back
    Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 S Columbian Way S 111, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    Arch Intern Med 162:1257-65. 2002
    ..Clinician responses to PAS requests, however, have only been described using data obtained from clinicians...
  17. ncbi request reprint Teaching communication skills to medical oncology fellows
    Anthony L Back
    Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 S Columbian Way, S 111, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    J Clin Oncol 21:2433-6. 2003
  18. pmc "Could I add something?": Teaching communication by intervening in real time during a clinical encounter
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    Acad Med 85:1048-51. 2010
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Communication skills: myths, realities, and new developments
    Anthony Back
    VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    J Support Oncol 1:169-71. 2003
  20. pmc Communicating bad news
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98195, USA
    West J Med 176:177-80. 2002
  21. ncbi request reprint Impact of palliative care case management on resource use by patients dying of cancer at a Veterans Affairs medical center
    Anthony L Back
    VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 8:26-35. 2005
    ..The VA Puget Sound Health Care System (VAPSHCS) started a palliative care service (PCS) in October 2001 to provide case management for patients with advanced cancer...
  22. ncbi request reprint Reflective teaching practices: an approach to teaching communication skills in a small-group setting
    Kelly Fryer-Edwards
    Department of Medical History and Ethics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Acad Med 81:638-44. 2006
    ..These reflective teaching practices, while developed for communication skills training, may be useful for teaching other challenging topics such as ethics and professionalism...
  23. ncbi request reprint Communication at times of transitions: how to help patients cope with loss and re-define hope
    Wendy G Evans
    Department of Medicine, Section of Medical Ethics and Palliative Care, Institute for Doctor Patient Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    Cancer J 12:417-24. 2006
    ..This is accomplished with the Ask-Tell-Ask and Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst techniques, and most importantly by being curious about patients' hopes and fears...
  24. doi request reprint Transitions regarding palliative and end-of-life care in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or advanced cancer: themes identified by patients, families, and clinicians
    Lynn F Reinke
    Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:601-9. 2008
    ..Patients may experience transitions in different ways than clinicians. No prior studies have examined this issue from patients', families', and clinicians' perspectives...
  25. doi request reprint An approach to understanding the interaction of hope and desire for explicit prognostic information among individuals with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or advanced cancer
    J Randall Curtis
    Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98104, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:610-20. 2008
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Family member involvement in hastened death
    Helene Starks
    Department of Medical History and Ethics, University of Washington, Box 357120, Seattle, WA 98195 7240, USA
    Death Stud 31:105-30. 2007
    ..These results highlight the positive and negative consequences of family members' participation in a hastened death...
  27. pmc How primary care providers talk to patients about alcohol: a qualitative study
    Kinsey A McCormick
    Northwest Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Gen Intern Med 21:966-72. 2006
    ..Alcohol misuse is a common and well-documented source of morbidity and mortality. Brief primary care alcohol counseling has been shown to benefit patients with alcohol misuse...
  28. pmc Effect of a quality-improvement intervention on end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial
    J Randall Curtis
    Harborview Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 183:348-55. 2011
    ..Because of high mortality, end-of-life care is an important component of intensive care...
  29. pmc Motivations for physician-assisted suicide
    Robert A Pearlman
    VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle Division, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    J Gen Intern Med 20:234-9. 2005
    ..To obtain detailed narrative accounts of patients' motivations for pursuing physician-assisted suicide (PAS)...
  30. ncbi request reprint Why now? Timing and circumstances of hastened deaths
    Helene Starks
    Department of Medical History and Ethics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 30:215-26. 2005
    ..Clinicians should regularly assess where patients perceive they are in the dying process and ask about their comfort with the pace of dying to identify opportunities for intervention...
  31. ncbi request reprint Burnout and self-reported patient care in an internal medicine residency program
    Tait D Shanafelt
    University of Washington, Veterans Affairs Northwest Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence, and Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington 98108, USA
    Ann Intern Med 136:358-67. 2002
    ..Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and a sense of low personal accomplishment. Little is known about burnout in residents or its relationship to patient care...
  32. pmc Withdrawing life support and resolution of conflict with families
    Jenny Way
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    BMJ 325:1342-5. 2002
  33. ncbi request reprint The effects of work-hour limitations on resident well-being, patient care, and education in an internal medicine residency program
    Lara Goitein
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Box 359762, University of Washington Harborview Medical Center, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, USA
    Arch Intern Med 165:2601-6. 2005
    ..The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour limitations (WHLs) were implemented in July 2003. Effects on resident well-being, patient care, and education are not well understood. We investigated these effects of WHLs...
  34. ncbi request reprint Manualized communication interventions to enhance palliative care research and training: rigorous, testable approaches
    Joseph S Weiner
    Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Department of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY 11040, USA
    J Palliat Med 9:371-81. 2006
    ..The advantages of manualized communication approaches; some concepts underlying manual construction; and challenges to extending manualized communication to the palliative care domain are discussed...
  35. pmc Titrating guidance: a model to guide physicians in assisting patients and family members who are facing complex decisions
    Nathan E Goldstein
    Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute of the Brookdale, Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City, USA
    Arch Intern Med 168:1733-9. 2008
    ..This model can help improve patient-physician communication and decision making so that complex and difficult decisions can be turned into ones that yield to medical expertise, good communication, and personal caring...
  36. ncbi request reprint The pursuit of physician-assisted suicide: role of psychiatric factors
    Ashok J Bharucha
    Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    J Palliat Med 6:873-83. 2003
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Qualitative methods in end-of-life research: recommendations to enhance the protection of human subjects
    Barbara A Koenig
    Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics, 701A Welch Road 1105, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 25:S43-52. 2003
    ..Sensitive topics, such as drug use, may require added protections...

Research Grants4

  1. End of Life Communication Skills for Oncology Fellows
    Anthony Back; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..This program will create a formal curriculum for communication skills that could be replicated in many institutions to improve the quality of oncologists-patient communication--and ultimately the quality of cancer care--nationwide. ..
  2. Training Oncology Faculty to Teach Communication Skills
    Anthony Back; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Our revised proposal represents an empirical, evidence-based approach by an accomplished investigator team with a unique group of interested participants created by the original Oncotalk program. ..