W W Au

Summary

Affiliation: University of Hawaii
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1106, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96734
    J Acoust Soc Am 136:EL67. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Nighttime foraging by deep diving echolocating odontocetes off the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau as determined by passive acoustic monitors
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 133:3119-27. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint Dolphin biosonar signals measured at extreme off-axis angles: insights to sound propagation in the head
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:1199-206. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Estimating the biosonar detection range of mesopelagic patches by spinner dolphins
    Whitlow Au
    HIMB, P O Box 1106, Kailua, HI 96734
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:3359. 2012
  5. ncbi request reprint One person view on publishing in JASA and JASA Express Letters
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, 46 007 Lilipuna Road
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:3432. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint The biosonar field around an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:569-76. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint Modeling the detection range of fish by echolocating bottlenose dolphins and harbor porpoises
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 121:3954-62. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Acoustic backscattering by Hawaiian lutjanid snappers. II. Broadband temporal and spectral structure
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:2767-74. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Automatic gain control in the echolocation system of dolphins
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    Nature 423:861-3. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Echolocation signals of dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) in Kaikoura, New Zealand
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1109, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:2307-13. 2004

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. ncbi request reprint Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1106, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96734
    J Acoust Soc Am 136:EL67. 2014
    ..Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification. ..
  2. doi request reprint Nighttime foraging by deep diving echolocating odontocetes off the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau as determined by passive acoustic monitors
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 133:3119-27. 2013
    ..Between 70% and 84% of biosonar clicks were detected at night. At present it is not clear why some of the known deep diving species, such as sperm whales and beaked whales, concentrate their foraging efforts at night...
  3. ncbi request reprint Dolphin biosonar signals measured at extreme off-axis angles: insights to sound propagation in the head
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:1199-206. 2012
    ..The generation of biosonar signals is a complex process and the propagation pathways through the dolphin's head are not well understood...
  4. ncbi request reprint Estimating the biosonar detection range of mesopelagic patches by spinner dolphins
    Whitlow Au
    HIMB, P O Box 1106, Kailua, HI 96734
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:3359. 2012
    ..Using the sonar equation, the biosonar threshold detection range of spinner dolphins was estimated to be approximately 50 to 64 m, more than sufficient range for the animals to formulate their prey herding behavior...
  5. ncbi request reprint One person view on publishing in JASA and JASA Express Letters
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, 46 007 Lilipuna Road
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:3432. 2012
    ..Associate editors should be assisting authors in getting their papers published. Responsibility for the content lies totally with the authors and not one bit with the associate editors...
  6. ncbi request reprint The biosonar field around an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 131:569-76. 2012
    ..The signals began to break up into two components at angles greater than ± 45° in the horizontal plane. The center frequency dropped off from its maximum at 0° in a non-uniform matter...
  7. ncbi request reprint Modeling the detection range of fish by echolocating bottlenose dolphins and harbor porpoises
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 121:3954-62. 2007
    ..The primary reason for the large differences in detection ranges between both species was attributed to the 36 dB higher source level of the bottlenose dolphin echolocation signals...
  8. ncbi request reprint Acoustic backscattering by Hawaiian lutjanid snappers. II. Broadband temporal and spectral structure
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:2767-74. 2003
    ..The echo structures in both the time and frequency domains were generally consistent within species and were easily distinguishable between species...
  9. ncbi request reprint Automatic gain control in the echolocation system of dolphins
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    Nature 423:861-3. 2003
    ..This characteristic has the same effect as time-varying gain in bats and technological sonar when considered from a sonar system perspective...
  10. ncbi request reprint Echolocation signals of dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) in Kaikoura, New Zealand
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1109, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:2307-13. 2004
    ..The wave form and spectrum of the echolocation signals were similar to those of other dolphins measured in the field...
  11. ncbi request reprint Acoustic properties of humpback whale songs
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 120:1103-10. 2006
    ..High-frequency harmonics extended beyond 24 kHz, suggesting that humpback whales may have an upper frequency limit of hearing as high as 24 kHz...
  12. ncbi request reprint Acoustic radiation from the head of echolocating harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, HI 96734, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2726-33. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Acoustic interaction of humpback whales and whale-watching boats
    W W Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, HI 96734, USA
    Mar Environ Res 49:469-81. 2000
    ..We concluded that it is unlikely that the levels of sounds produced by the boats in our study would have any grave effects on the auditory system of humpback whales...
  14. doi request reprint Broadband backscatter from individual Hawaiian mesopelagic boundary community animals with implications for spinner dolphin foraging
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 123:2884-94. 2008
    ..The results were also compared with multi-frequency volume backscatter of the mesopelagic boundary community sound scattering layer...
  15. ncbi request reprint Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) hearing threshold for brief broadband signals
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua 96734, USA
    J Comp Psychol 116:151-7. 2002
    ..The broadband results suggest that an echolocating bottlenose dolphin should be able to detect a 7.62-cm diameter water-filled sphere out to a range of 178 m in a quiet environment...
  16. ncbi request reprint Echolocation signals of wild Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis)
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1109, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:598-604. 2003
    ..The characteristics of the signals were similar to those of captive Tursiops truncatus, Delphinapterus leucas and Pseudorca crassidens measured in open waters under controlled conditions...
  17. doi request reprint Acoustic basis for fish prey discrimination by echolocating dolphins and porpoises
    Whitlow W L Au
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 126:460-7. 2009
    ..The overall results suggest that there are sufficient acoustic cues available to discriminate between the four species of fish based on the echoes received, independent of aspect angle...
  18. ncbi request reprint Phantom echo highlight amplitude and temporal difference resolutions of an echolocating dolphin, Tursiops truncatus
    Mark W Muller
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, 46 007 Lilipuna Road, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744 3617, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 122:2255-62. 2007
    ....
  19. pmc 'Megapclicks': acoustic click trains and buzzes produced during night-time foraging of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)
    Alison K Stimpert
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawai i Institute of Marine Biology, PO Box 1106, Kailua, HI 96734, USA
    Biol Lett 3:467-70. 2007
    ..This acoustic behaviour seems to form part of a night-time feeding tactic for humpbacks and also expands the known acoustic repertoire of baleen whales in general...
  20. doi request reprint Common humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) sound types for passive acoustic monitoring
    Alison K Stimpert
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawai i Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 129:476-82. 2011
    ..This identification of two of the most common sound types will be useful for moving forward conservation efforts on this Northwest Atlantic feeding ground...
  21. ncbi request reprint Rolling stones and stable homes: social structure, habitat diversity and population genetics of the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris)
    Kimberly R Andrews
    Hawai i Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawai i, PO Box 1346, Kaneohe, Hawai i 96744, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:732-48. 2010
    ..090, P < 0.001); this isolation may also influence social and genetic structure within Hawai'i. Our results illustrate that genetic and social structure are flexible traits that can vary between even closely-related populations...
  22. doi request reprint An ecological acoustic recorder (EAR) for long-term monitoring of biological and anthropogenic sounds on coral reefs and other marine habitats
    Marc O Lammers
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, 46 007 Lilipuna Road, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744 and Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 123:1720-8. 2008
    ..The results indicate that acoustic monitoring may be an effective means of tracking biological and anthropogenic activity at locations where continuous monitoring by traditional survey methods is impractical...
  23. ncbi request reprint Temporary threshold shifts and recovery following noise exposure in the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Paul E Nachtigall
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:3425-9. 2003
    ..Measured temporary threshold shifts averaged 11 dB. Threshold determination took at least 20 min. Recovery was examined 360, 180, 90, and 45 min following exposure and was essentially complete within 45 min...
  24. ncbi request reprint Energy: converting from acoustic to biological resource units
    Kelly J Benoit-Bird
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kailua 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 111:2070-5. 2002
    ..Consequently, it is possible to directly convert acoustic energy from these animals to organic resource units without having knowledge of the size distribution of the populations being studied...
  25. doi request reprint Functional bandwidth of an echolocating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    Stuart D Ibsen
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kailua, Hawaii 96734 1106, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:1214-21. 2009
    ..The absence of temporal cues between some of the targets the dolphin could discriminate indicated that in these cases the target discrimination cues were based solely on the frequency content...
  26. ncbi request reprint The whistles of Hawaiian spinner dolphins
    Carmen Bazúa-Durán
    Department of Oceanography, SOEST, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road MSB, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 112:3064-72. 2002
    ..Standardization in recording and analysis procedure is clearly needed...
  27. ncbi request reprint Echolocation in the Risso's dolphin, Grampus griseus
    Jennifer D Philips
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:605-16. 2003
    ..The particular acoustic and behavioral findings in the study are discussed with respect to the possible direction of the sonar transmission beam of the species...
  28. ncbi request reprint The broadband social acoustic signaling behavior of spinner and spotted dolphins
    Marc O Lammers
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:1629-39. 2003
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Echolocation signals of free-ranging killer whales (Orcinus orca) and modeling of foraging for chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)
    Whitlow W L Au
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:901-9. 2004
    ..In moderately heavy rain conditions, the detection range will be reduced substantially and the echo level at a horizontal range of 40 m would be close to the level of the rain noise...
  30. ncbi request reprint Changes in signal parameters over time for an echolocating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin performing the same target discrimination task
    Stuart D Ibsen
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106 Kailua, Hawaii 96734 1106, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 122:2446-50. 2007
    ..Despite the dramatic differences in click frequency content the dolphin was able to perform the same discrimination task at nearly the same level of success...
  31. ncbi request reprint Classification of electronically generated phantom targets by an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)
    R Aubauer
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 107:2750-4. 2000
    ..Phantom replicas were presented in a probe technique during a materials discrimination experiment. The animal accepted the phantom echoes and classified them in the same manner as it classified real targets...
  32. doi request reprint Predicting temporary threshold shifts in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus): the effects of noise level and duration
    T Aran Mooney
    Department of Zoology and Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 125:1816-26. 2009
    ..The data reflected the complexity of TTS in mammals that should be taken into account when predicting odontocete TTS...
  33. ncbi request reprint Acoustic features of objects matched by an echolocating bottlenose dolphin
    Caroline M Delong
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 119:1867-79. 2006
    ..These data suggest that dolphins use multiple features and integrate information across echoes from a range of object orientations...
  34. ncbi request reprint Acoustic backscattering by Hawaiian lutjanid snappers. 1. Target strength and swimbladder characteristics
    Kelly J Benoit-Bird
    Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, P O Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:2757-66. 2003
    ..75) and were within 3 dB of the measured values. This model predicts the target strengths of all species equally well, unlike those based on length...
  35. ncbi request reprint Changes in consistency patterns of click frequency content over time of an echolocating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin
    Stuart D Ibsen
    Marine Mammal Research Program, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, PO Box 1106, Kailua, Hawaii 96734 1106, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 127:3821-9. 2010
    ..The shift in consistency over time indicates these consistent regions were not simply artifacts of click production but rather an active control of frequency content...
  36. ncbi request reprint Audiogram of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) measured with narrow-band frequency-modulated signals
    Ronald A Kastelein
    Harderwijk Marine Mammal Park, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 112:334-44. 2002
    ..The time it took for the porpoise to move its head 22 cm after the signal onset (movement time) was also measured. It increased from about 1 s at 10 dB above threshold, to about 1.5 s at threshold...
  37. doi request reprint Time-frequency analysis and modeling of the backscatter of categorized dolphin echolocation clicks for target discrimination
    Mark W Muller
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawai at Manoa, 2540 Dole Street, Honolulu, Hawai 96822 2303, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 124:657-66. 2008
    ..The modification of the outgoing clicks and examination of time-frequency target information may be fundamental to a dolphin's ability to identify and discriminate targets...
  38. ncbi request reprint Audiogram of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)
    Ronald A Kastelein
    Harderwijk Marine Mammal Park, Strandboulevard oost 1, 3841 AB Harderwijk, The Netherlands
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:1130-7. 2003
    ..The animal's hearing became less sensitive below 32 kHz and above 120 kHz. Sensitivity decreased by about 8 dB per octave below 1 kHz and fell sharply at a rate of about 390 dB per octave above 140 kHz...
  39. ncbi request reprint Geographic variations in the whistles of spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) of the Main Hawai'ian Islands
    Carmen Bazúa-Durán
    Department of Oceanography, SOEST, University of Hawai i, 1000 Pope Road MSB, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 116:3757-69. 2004
    ..Whistle duration and the number of turns and steps of a whistle may be more important in delivering information at the individual level than whistle frequency parameters...
  40. ncbi request reprint Invariance of evoked-potential echo-responses to target strength and distance in an echolocating false killer whale
    Alexander Ya Supin
    Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 33 Leninsky Prospect, 119071 Moscow, Russia
    J Acoust Soc Am 117:3928-35. 2005
    ..It is supposed that the constancy of echo-related AEP results from variation of hearing sensitivity depending on the target strength and release of echo-related responses from masking by transmitted pulses depending on the distance...
  41. ncbi request reprint The interaction of outgoing echolocation pulses and echoes in the false killer whale's auditory system: evoked-potential study
    Alexander Ya Supin
    Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, 33 Leninsky Prospect, 119071 Moscow, Russia
    J Acoust Soc Am 115:3218-25. 2004
    ..The amplitude of the echo-related AEP was almost independent of distance, even though variation of target distance from 1 to 8 m influenced the echo intensity by as much as 36 dB...
  42. ncbi request reprint Testing the odontocete acoustic prey debilitation hypothesis: no stunning results
    Kelly J Benoit-Bird
    College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 COAS Administration Building, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 120:1118-23. 2006
    ..Based on the results, the hypothesis that acoustic signals of odontocetes alone can disorient or "stun" prey cannot be supported...
  43. ncbi request reprint Echo features used by human listeners to discriminate among objects that vary in material or wall thickness: implications for echolocating dolphins
    Caroline M Delong
    Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Box 1953, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 121:605-17. 2007
    ..Human listening studies can be used to quickly identify salient combinations of echo features that permit object discrimination, which can then be used to generate hypotheses that can be tested using dolphins as subjects...
  44. ncbi request reprint Human listeners provide insights into echo features used by dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to discriminate among objects
    Caroline M Delong
    Department of Psychology, University of Hawai i at Manoa, Manoa, HI, USA
    J Comp Psychol 121:306-19. 2007
    ..Human listeners can quickly identify salient combinations of echo features that permit object discrimination, which can be used to generate hypotheses that can be tested using dolphins as subjects...
  45. ncbi request reprint Evoked potential recording during echolocation in a false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens
    Alexander Ya Supin
    J Acoust Soc Am 113:2408-11. 2003
  46. doi request reprint Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources
    Kelly J Benoit-Bird
    College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 COAS Administration Building, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 123:1318-28. 2008
    ..Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies...
  47. ncbi request reprint Source levels of clicks from free-ranging white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris Gray 1846) recorded in Icelandic waters
    Marianne H Rasmussen
    Center for Sound Communication, Institute of Biology, Odense University, Denmark
    J Acoust Soc Am 111:1122-5. 2002
    ..Source levels in a single click train varied from 194 to 211 dB peak-to-peak (p-p) re: 1 microPa. The source levels varied linearly with the log of range. The maximum source levels recorded were 219 dB (p-p) re: 1 microPa...