J J Anderson

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Risk of high dietary calcium for arterial calcification in older adults
    John J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Nutrients 5:3964-74. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Calcium intakes and femoral and lumbar bone density of elderly U.S. men and women: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006 analysis
    J J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7461, USA
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 97:4531-9. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Health potential of soy isoflavones for menopausal women
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, UNC Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7400, USA
    Public Health Nutr 2:489-504. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Micronutrient intakes in two US populations of older adults: lipid research clinics program prevalence study findings
    J J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7461, USA
    J Nutr Health Aging 13:595-600. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Osteoporosis prevention in premenopausal women: using a stage model approach to examine the predictors of behavior
    S J Blalock
    Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599 7330, USA
    Health Psychol 15:84-93. 1996
  6. ncbi request reprint Calcium requirements during adolescence to maximize bone health
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400, USA. jjb_andersonunc.edu
    J Am Coll Nutr 20:186S-191S. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Correlates of blood pressure in Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA adolescents
    R J Kuczmarski
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599
    J Am Coll Nutr 13:165-73. 1994
  8. ncbi request reprint Plant-based diets and bone health: nutritional implications
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 7400, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 70:539S-542S. 1999
  9. ncbi request reprint Isoflavones inhibit proliferation of ovarian cancer cells in vitro via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway
    X Chen
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA
    Nutr Cancer 41:165-71. 2001

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Risk of high dietary calcium for arterial calcification in older adults
    John J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Nutrients 5:3964-74. 2013
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Calcium intakes and femoral and lumbar bone density of elderly U.S. men and women: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006 analysis
    J J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7461, USA
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 97:4531-9. 2012
    ..This analysis was aimed at assessing the benefits of total calcium intake from diet and supplements on both femoral neck and lumbar vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) in a representative sample of older U.S. women and men...
  3. ncbi request reprint Health potential of soy isoflavones for menopausal women
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, UNC Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7400, USA
    Public Health Nutr 2:489-504. 1999
    ..To review the current literature on the effects of soy isoflavones, one class of phyto-oestrogens, on cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cancer and climacteric symptoms...
  4. ncbi request reprint Micronutrient intakes in two US populations of older adults: lipid research clinics program prevalence study findings
    J J B Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7461, USA
    J Nutr Health Aging 13:595-600. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Osteoporosis prevention in premenopausal women: using a stage model approach to examine the predictors of behavior
    S J Blalock
    Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599 7330, USA
    Health Psychol 15:84-93. 1996
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Calcium requirements during adolescence to maximize bone health
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400, USA. jjb_andersonunc.edu
    J Am Coll Nutr 20:186S-191S. 2001
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Correlates of blood pressure in Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA adolescents
    R J Kuczmarski
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599
    J Am Coll Nutr 13:165-73. 1994
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Plant-based diets and bone health: nutritional implications
    J J Anderson
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 7400, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 70:539S-542S. 1999
    ..A dietary shift toward a more plant-based diet in Western nations may be beneficial to bone health, but is not likely to counter the adverse effects of limited physical activity and low estrogen exposure...
  9. ncbi request reprint Isoflavones inhibit proliferation of ovarian cancer cells in vitro via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway
    X Chen
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA
    Nutr Cancer 41:165-71. 2001
    ..In summary, genistein and daidzein independently modify cytokine production and reduce ovarian cancer cell proliferation via, at least in part, an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway...