MARION ANDERS

Summary

Affiliation: University of Rochester
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Exploiting endobiotic metabolic pathways to target xenobiotic antioxidants to mitochondria
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Mitochondrion 13:454-63. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint Formation and toxicity of anesthetic degradation products
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York 14642, USA
    Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 45:147-76. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Mitochondria: new drug targets for oxidative stress-induced diseases
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2:71-9. 2006
  4. doi request reprint Putting bioactivation reactions to work: Targeting antioxidants to mitochondria
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Mitochondrial Research and Innovation Group, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Chem Biol Interact 192:8-13. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint Inactivation of glutathione transferase zeta by dichloroacetic acid and other fluorine-lacking alpha-haloalkanoic acids
    W B Anderson
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 12:1144-9. 1999
  6. pmc Glutathione transferase zeta catalyses the oxygenation of the carcinogen dichloroacetic acid to glyoxylic acid
    Z Tong
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biochem J 331:371-4. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint Glutathione transferase zeta-catalyzed bioactivation of dichloroacetic acid: reaction of glyoxylate with amino acid nucleophiles
    Wayne B Anderson
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 17:650-62. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Targeting antioxidants to mitochondria: a new therapeutic direction
    Shey Shing Sheu
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1762:256-65. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Glutathione transferase zeta-catalyzed biotransformation of dichloroacetic acid and other alpha-haloacids
    Z Tong
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 11:1332-8. 1998
  10. ncbi request reprint Kinetics of the biotransformation of maleylacetone and chlorofluoroacetic acid by polymorphic variants of human glutathione transferase zeta (hGSTZ1-1)
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 15:957-63. 2002

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. doi request reprint Exploiting endobiotic metabolic pathways to target xenobiotic antioxidants to mitochondria
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Mitochondrion 13:454-63. 2013
    ..These results demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting mitochondrial bioactivation reactions for targeted drug delivery. ..
  2. ncbi request reprint Formation and toxicity of anesthetic degradation products
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York 14642, USA
    Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 45:147-76. 2005
    ..The elucidation of the mechanisms of formation and bioactivation of degradation products has allowed for the safe use of anesthetics that may undergo degradation in the anesthesia circuit...
  3. ncbi request reprint Mitochondria: new drug targets for oxidative stress-induced diseases
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2:71-9. 2006
    ..Future studies will undoubtedly exploit the unique biophysical and biochemical properties of mitochondria, including mitochondrial activation of prodrugs, for the targeted delivery of cytoprotective agents...
  4. doi request reprint Putting bioactivation reactions to work: Targeting antioxidants to mitochondria
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Mitochondrial Research and Innovation Group, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Chem Biol Interact 192:8-13. 2011
    ..These results demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting bioactivation reactions for targeted drug delivery...
  5. ncbi request reprint Inactivation of glutathione transferase zeta by dichloroacetic acid and other fluorine-lacking alpha-haloalkanoic acids
    W B Anderson
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 12:1144-9. 1999
    ..These data show that the observed DCA-induced decrease in the level of DCA metabolism is caused by the inactivation of GSTZ...
  6. pmc Glutathione transferase zeta catalyses the oxygenation of the carcinogen dichloroacetic acid to glyoxylic acid
    Z Tong
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biochem J 331:371-4. 1998
    ..These results demonstrate that the glutathione-dependent oxygenation of DCA to glyoxylic acid is catalysed by a Zeta-class glutathione transferase...
  7. ncbi request reprint Glutathione transferase zeta-catalyzed bioactivation of dichloroacetic acid: reaction of glyoxylate with amino acid nucleophiles
    Wayne B Anderson
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 17:650-62. 2004
    ..The reaction of glyoxylate with cellular macromolecules may be associated with the multiorgan toxicity of DCA...
  8. ncbi request reprint Targeting antioxidants to mitochondria: a new therapeutic direction
    Shey Shing Sheu
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1762:256-65. 2006
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Glutathione transferase zeta-catalyzed biotransformation of dichloroacetic acid and other alpha-haloacids
    Z Tong
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 11:1332-8. 1998
    ..Elimination of glutathione from the hemithioacetal would give glyoxylic acid...
  10. ncbi request reprint Kinetics of the biotransformation of maleylacetone and chlorofluoroacetic acid by polymorphic variants of human glutathione transferase zeta (hGSTZ1-1)
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 15:957-63. 2002
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Perturbation of maleylacetoacetic acid metabolism in rats with dichloroacetic Acid-induced glutathione transferase zeta deficiency
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, 14642, USA
    Toxicol Sci 74:192-202. 2003
    ..These data indicate that DCA-induced inactivation of GSTZ1-1 leads to formation of an MAA-derived intermediate, MA, that may be a mediator and biomarker for DCA-associated toxicities...
  12. ncbi request reprint Nephrotoxicity of chlorofluoroacetic acid in rats
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology and Laboratory of Animal Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Toxicol Sci 70:261-8. 2002
    ..2 mmol DFA/kg/day for 5 days had normal urine volumes but showed proximal and distal tubular damage; fluoride excretion was not elevated. The mechanism of DFA-induced nephrotoxicity is not known but appears to differ from that of CFA...
  13. pmc Mitochondrial biotransformation of omega-(phenoxy)alkanoic acids, 3-(phenoxy)acrylic acids, and omega-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylthio)alkanoic acids: a prodrug strategy for targeting cytoprotective antioxidants to mitochondria
    Kurt S Roser
    Mitochondrial Research and Innovation Group, Department of Anesthesiology, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem 18:1441-8. 2010
    ..These results demonstrate that mitochondrial beta-oxidation is a potentially useful delivery system for targeting antioxidants to mitochondria...
  14. ncbi request reprint Biotransformation of N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)perfluorooctanesulfonamide by rat liver microsomes, cytosol, and slices and by expressed rat and human cytochromes P450
    Lin Xu
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14624, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 17:767-75. 2004
    ..These results show that the major pathway for the biotransformation of N-EtFOSE is N-dealkylation to give FOSA. The biotransformation of FOSA to PFOS explains the observation that PFOS is found in animals given N-EtFOSE...
  15. ncbi request reprint Cysteine conjugate beta-lyase-dependent biotransformation of the cysteine S-conjugates of the sevoflurane degradation product compound A in human, nonhuman primate, and rat kidney cytosol and mitochondria
    R A Iyer
    University of Rochester, Department of Pharmacology, New York 14642, USA
    Anesthesiology 85:1454-61. 1996
    ..These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that cysteine S-conjugates of compound A undergo beta-lyase-dependent biotransformation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Immunohistochemical localization and activity of glutathione transferase zeta (GSTZ1-1) in rat tissues
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Drug Metab Dispos 30:616-25. 2002
    ..These findings indicate that the DCA-induced inactivation of GSTZ1-1 in different tissues may result in multiorgan disorders that may be associated with perturbed tyrosine metabolism...
  17. ncbi request reprint Mass spectral characterization of dichloroacetic acid-modified human glutathione transferase zeta
    Wayne B Anderson
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 15:1387-97. 2002
    ..These findings explain the DCA-induced inactivation of GSTZ1-1 observed in humans and rats...
  18. ncbi request reprint Alkylation and inactivation of human glutathione transferase zeta (hGSTZ1-1) by maleylacetone and fumarylacetone
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 15:707-16. 2002
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Structure-activity relationship for the biotransformation of haloalkenes by rat liver microsomal glutathione transferase 1
    Larry J Jolivette
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 15:1036-41. 2002
    ..73 eV and that cGST catalyzed the reaction of glutathione with haloalkenes with E(LUMO) values more negative than -0.06 eV...
  20. ncbi request reprint Calcium, ATP, and ROS: a mitochondrial love-hate triangle
    Paul S Brookes
    University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave, Box 711, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287:C817-33. 2004
    ..Overall, a "two-hit" hypothesis is developed, in which Ca(2+) plus another pathological stimulus can bring about mitochondrial dysfunction...
  21. ncbi request reprint Acivicin-induced alterations in renal and hepatic glutathione concentrations and in gamma-glutamyltransferase activities
    Hoffman B M Lantum
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biochem Pharmacol 67:1421-6. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Computational and experimental studies on the distribution of addition and substitution products of the microsomal glutathione transferase 1-catalyzed conjugation of glutathione with fluoroalkenes
    Larry J Jolivette
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 711, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 16:137-44. 2003
    ..The results show that this computational model accurately predicted the distribution of the addition and substitution products that result from the MGST1-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with these fluoroalkenes...
  23. ncbi request reprint Chemical toxicology of reactive intermediates formed by the glutathione-dependent bioactivation of halogen-containing compounds
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 214642, USA
    Chem Res Toxicol 21:145-59. 2008
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Glutathione-dependent bioactivation of haloalkanes and haloalkenes
    M W Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Drug Metab Rev 36:583-94. 2004
    ..With all of these compounds, the formation of reactive intermediates is associated with their observed toxicity...

Research Grants13

  1. METABOLISM AND TOXICITY OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS
    MARION ANDERS; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ....
  2. METABOLISM AND TOXICITY OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS
    MARION ANDERS; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Hence, DCA may also find use in the management of HT-1. It is, therefore, important to explore the mechanism by which DCA and other dihaloacetates inactivate GSTZ1-1. ..