Heather L Urry

Summary

Affiliation: Tufts University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex are inversely coupled during regulation of negative affect and predict the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion among older adults
    Heather L Urry
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4415-25. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Using reappraisal to regulate unpleasant emotional episodes: goals and timing matter
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Emotion 9:782-97. 2009
  3. doi request reprint Seeing, thinking, and feeling: emotion-regulating effects of gaze-directed cognitive reappraisal
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Emotion 10:125-35. 2010
  4. pmc Individual differences in some (but not all) medial prefrontal regions reflect cognitive demand while regulating unpleasant emotion
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, 490 Boston Avenue, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Neuroimage 47:852-63. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity are associated with evaluation speed and psychological well-being
    Carien M van Reekum
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 52706, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 19:237-48. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Gaze fixations predict brain activation during the voluntary regulation of picture-induced negative affect
    Carien M van Reekum
    Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Neuroimage 36:1041-55. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Failure to regulate: counterproductive recruitment of top-down prefrontal-subcortical circuitry in major depression
    Tom Johnstone
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705, USA
    J Neurosci 27:8877-84. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Making a life worth living: neural correlates of well-being
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology and W M Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:367-72. 2004
  9. doi request reprint Prefrontal mediation of age differences in cognitive reappraisal
    Philipp C Opitz
    Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 33:645-55. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Socioeconomic status predicts objective and subjective sleep quality in aging women
    Elliot M Friedman
    Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53726, USA
    Psychosom Med 69:682-91. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. ncbi request reprint Amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex are inversely coupled during regulation of negative affect and predict the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion among older adults
    Heather L Urry
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4415-25. 2006
    ..Individual differences yielded the predicted link between brain function while reducing negative affect in the laboratory and diurnal regulation of endocrine activity in the home environment...
  2. doi request reprint Using reappraisal to regulate unpleasant emotional episodes: goals and timing matter
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Emotion 9:782-97. 2009
    ..These data underscore the importance of regulatory goals and the impact of regulatory timing as a moderator of emotion regulatory success within an emotion episode...
  3. doi request reprint Seeing, thinking, and feeling: emotion-regulating effects of gaze-directed cognitive reappraisal
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Emotion 10:125-35. 2010
    ..Overall, the results suggest that changes in appraisal are the likely mechanism for the ER effects of CR...
  4. pmc Individual differences in some (but not all) medial prefrontal regions reflect cognitive demand while regulating unpleasant emotion
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, 490 Boston Avenue, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Neuroimage 47:852-63. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity are associated with evaluation speed and psychological well-being
    Carien M van Reekum
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 52706, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 19:237-48. 2007
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Gaze fixations predict brain activation during the voluntary regulation of picture-induced negative affect
    Carien M van Reekum
    Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Neuroimage 36:1041-55. 2007
    ..Furthermore, this variation in gaze fixation accounted for substantial amounts of variance in brain activation. These data point to the importance of controlling for gaze fixation in studies of emotion regulation that use visual stimuli...
  7. ncbi request reprint Failure to regulate: counterproductive recruitment of top-down prefrontal-subcortical circuitry in major depression
    Tom Johnstone
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705, USA
    J Neurosci 27:8877-84. 2007
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Making a life worth living: neural correlates of well-being
    Heather L Urry
    Department of Psychology and W M Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:367-72. 2004
    ..Appropriately engaging sources of appetitive motivation, characteristic of higher left than right baseline levels of prefrontal activation, may encourage the experience of well-being...
  9. doi request reprint Prefrontal mediation of age differences in cognitive reappraisal
    Philipp C Opitz
    Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 33:645-55. 2012
    ..This pattern confirms the importance of cognitive control in reappraising unpleasant situations and suggests that older age may (but does not always) confer effective emotion regulation...
  10. ncbi request reprint Socioeconomic status predicts objective and subjective sleep quality in aging women
    Elliot M Friedman
    Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53726, USA
    Psychosom Med 69:682-91. 2007
    ..Epidemiological studies linking SES and sleep quality have traditionally relied on self-reported assessments of sleep...
  11. doi request reprint Mood-induced shifts in attentional bias to emotional information predict ill- and well-being
    Sarah R Cavanagh
    Department of Psychology, Assumption College, Worcester, MA 01609, USA
    Emotion 11:241-8. 2011
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Threat facilitates subsequent executive control during anxious mood
    Jeffrey L Birk
    Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
    Emotion 11:1291-304. 2011
    ..The findings are partially consistent with the predictions of DCF in that low-level threat improved executive control, at least during a state of anxiety...
  13. ncbi request reprint Psychological well-being and ill-being: do they have distinct or mirrored biological correlates?
    Carol D Ryff
    Institute on Aging, Medical Science Center, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Psychother Psychosom 75:85-95. 2006
    ..e. well-being and ill-being correlate similarly with biomarkers, but show opposite directional signs), whereas independence predicts 'distinct' biological correlates (i.e. well-being and ill-being have different biological signatures)...
  14. pmc Social relationships, sleep quality, and interleukin-6 in aging women
    Elliot M Friedman
    Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53726, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18757-62. 2005
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint The stability of resting frontal electroencephalographic asymmetry in depression
    John J B Allen
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 0068, USA
    Psychophysiology 41:269-80. 2004
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Cognition and Emotion Lecture at the 2010 SPSP Emotion Preconference
    James J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Cogn Emot 25:765-81. 2011
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Now you feel it, now you don't: frontal brain electrical asymmetry and individual differences in emotion regulation
    Daren C Jackson
    University of Wisconsin Madison, 53706, USA
    Psychol Sci 14:612-7. 2003
    ..This relation between resting frontal activation and recovery following an aversive event supports the idea of a frontally mediated mechanism involved in one form of automatic emotion regulation...