W Margolin

Summary

Affiliation: Texas Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial mitosis: actin in a new role at the origin
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 15:R259-61. 2005
  2. pmc The early divisome protein FtsA interacts directly through its 1c subdomain with the cytoplasmic domain of the late divisome protein FtsN
    Kimberly K Busiek
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
    J Bacteriol 194:1989-2000. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Spatial regulation of cytokinesis in bacteria
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 4:647-52. 2001
  4. doi request reprint Sculpting the bacterial cell
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 19:R812-22. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Bacterial division: the fellowship of the ring
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, 77030, Houston, TX, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R16-8. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Bacterial cytoskeleton: not your run-of-the-mill tubulin
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 17:R633-6. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape: growing off this mortal coil
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R705-7. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape: concave coiled coils curve caulobacter
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R242-4. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Bacterial division: another way to box in the ring
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R881-4. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Gliding motility: anticipating the next move with a molecular clock
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R85-7. 2006

Research Grants

Collaborators

  • R Wang
  • Eugenia Mileykovskaya
  • William Dowhan
  • Peter Christie
  • Rolf Bernander
  • Klas Flärdh
  • Karsten Kruse
  • Paul R Gilson
  • Xin Xing Tan
  • Daisuke Shiomi
  • Brett Geissler
  • Brian D Corbin
  • X C Yu
  • Q Sun
  • Tushar K Beuria
  • Mahalakshmi Sadasivam
  • X Ma
  • Kimberly K Busiek
  • Jennifer R Juarez
  • Yipeng Wang
  • Michal Letek
  • Christophe S Bernard
  • Qin Sun
  • Swapna Thanedar
  • Sandra Ramirez-Arcos
  • Zhiyong Ding
  • Jesus M Eraso
  • Srinivas Mullapudi
  • Efrén Ordóñez
  • Luis M Mateos
  • José Vaquera
  • Jose A Gil
  • R A Britton
  • Dany Elraheb
  • Zhenming Zhao
  • Jo Anne R Dillon
  • Atmakuri Krishnamohan
  • Simon J Jakubowski
  • Jason Szeto
  • Xuan Chuan Yu
  • J R Lupski
  • A H Tran
  • S DasGupta
  • D L Court
  • B S Powell
  • E K Weihe
  • G Singh
  • E L Jonietz
  • D W Ehrhardt

Detail Information

Publications53

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial mitosis: actin in a new role at the origin
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 15:R259-61. 2005
    ..Recent results suggest that MreB is part of a kinetochore-like complex that specifically segregates the replication origin region of the bacterial chromosome...
  2. pmc The early divisome protein FtsA interacts directly through its 1c subdomain with the cytoplasmic domain of the late divisome protein FtsN
    Kimberly K Busiek
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
    J Bacteriol 194:1989-2000. 2012
    ..Since FtsA binds directly to FtsZ and FtsN interacts with enzymes involved in septum synthesis and splitting, this interaction between early and late divisome proteins may be one of several feedback controls for Z ring constriction...
  3. ncbi request reprint Spatial regulation of cytokinesis in bacteria
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 4:647-52. 2001
    ..This review summarizes and integrates these insights...
  4. doi request reprint Sculpting the bacterial cell
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 19:R812-22. 2009
    ..Other bacteria that lack MreB homologs or even cell walls use distinct cytoskeletal systems to maintain their distinct shapes. Here I review what is known about the mechanisms that determine the shape of prokaryotic cells...
  5. ncbi request reprint Bacterial division: the fellowship of the ring
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, 77030, Houston, TX, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R16-8. 2003
    ..Recently a new protein, ZapA, has been discovered that localizes to the Z ring and stabilizes it, probably by promoting the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments...
  6. ncbi request reprint Bacterial cytoskeleton: not your run-of-the-mill tubulin
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 17:R633-6. 2007
    ..A recent study has shown that TubZ polymers exhibit treadmilling behavior in vivo, suggesting that they are involved in mitotic activity...
  7. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape: growing off this mortal coil
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R705-7. 2003
    ..Recent results show that new cell wall biosynthesis occurs along a helical track dependent on one of these actin homologs, providing new insights into bacterial cell growth, division and shape...
  8. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape: concave coiled coils curve caulobacter
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R242-4. 2004
    ..Bacterial cells exhibit a wide variety of shapes. Recent results indicate that the characteristic crescent shape of Caulobacter crescentus depends upon an inter-mediate filament-like protein that localizes to the concave side of the cell...
  9. ncbi request reprint Bacterial division: another way to box in the ring
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R881-4. 2006
    ..Caulobacter crescentus lacks these systems, but recent work has uncovered a novel regulator that achieves the same goals...
  10. ncbi request reprint Gliding motility: anticipating the next move with a molecular clock
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R85-7. 2006
    ..Recent results show that cell reversal correlates with the migration of FrzS from the old leading pole of the cell to the new leading pole...
  11. ncbi request reprint FtsZ and the division of prokaryotic cells and organelles
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 6:862-71. 2005
    ..Recent advances in genomics and cell-imaging techniques have paved the way for the remarkable progress in our understanding of fission in bacteria and organelles...
  12. ncbi request reprint Bacterial cell division: a moving MinE sweeper boggles the MinD
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 11:R395-8. 2001
    ..Recent studies have shown that MinE, previously thought to form a static ring near the division site at the midcell position, actually joins MinC and MinD in their rapid oscillation between the cell poles...
  13. ncbi request reprint FtsZ ring clusters in min and partition mutants: role of both the Min system and the nucleoid in regulating FtsZ ring localization
    X C Yu
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 32:315-26. 1999
    ..A model is proposed in which both the inhibitory effect of the nucleoid and the regulation by MinCDE ensure that cells divide precisely at the midpoint...
  14. ncbi request reprint FtsZ rings in mukB mutants with or without the Min system
    X C Yu
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Biochimie 83:125-9. 2001
    ..These results provide further evidence that the negative topological effect of nucleoids in cells lacking MukB is partially but not totally suppressed, and that the absence of the Min system allows more promiscuous Z ring formation...
  15. pmc Influence of the nucleoid on placement of FtsZ and MinE rings in Escherichia coli
    Q Sun
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:1413-22. 2001
    ..These data suggest that both replicating and nonreplicating nucleoids are capable of topologically excluding Z rings but not MinE...
  16. pmc Interactions between heterologous FtsA and FtsZ proteins at the FtsZ ring
    X Ma
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 179:6788-97. 1997
    ..coli proteins and those of the two other species may be important for specific interactions...
  17. pmc Role of the C terminus of FtsK in Escherichia coli chromosome segregation
    X C Yu
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 180:6424-8. 1998
    ..When the truncated ftsK was combined with a minCDE deletion, chains of minicells were generated, many of which contained DNA. These results suggest that the C terminus of FtsK has an important role in chromosome partitioning...
  18. pmc Genetic and functional analyses of the conserved C-terminal core domain of Escherichia coli FtsZ
    X Ma
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 181:7531-44. 1999
    ..Furthermore, two point mutants in this region (L372A and P375A) showed weakened binding to FtsA. In contrast, ZipA was capable of binding to all four stable point mutants in the FtsZ C-terminal core but not to the 12-amino-acid deletion...
  19. pmc Localization of cell division protein FtsK to the Escherichia coli septum and identification of a potential N-terminal targeting domain
    X C Yu
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 180:1296-304. 1998
    ..When the ftsK44 mutation was incorporated into the FtsK-GFP fusions, localization to midcell ranged between very weak and undetectable, suggesting that the FtsK44 mutant protein is defective in targeting the septum...
  20. ncbi request reprint Organelle division: Self-assembling GTPase caught in the middle
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, 77030, USA med uth tmc edu
    Curr Biol 10:R328-30. 2000
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Themes and variations in prokaryotic cell division
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Houston Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Rev 24:531-48. 2000
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Assembly of the FtsZ ring at the central division site in the absence of the chromosome
    Q Sun
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 29:491-503. 1998
    ..This discovery strongly suggests that the chromosome itself is not required for the proper positioning and development of the medial division site...
  23. pmc Localization and function of early cell division proteins in filamentous Escherichia coli cells lacking phosphatidylethanolamine
    E Mileykovskaya
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Houston, Medical School, Houston, Texas 77225, USA
    J Bacteriol 180:4252-7. 1998
    ..The results suggest that the lack of PE may affect the correct interaction of FtsZ with membrane nucleation sites and alter FtsZ ring structure so as to prevent or delay its constriction...
  24. pmc Colocalization of cell division proteins FtsZ and FtsA to cytoskeletal structures in living Escherichia coli cells by using green fluorescent protein
    X Ma
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93:12998-3003. 1996
    ..coli FtsZ, suggesting a degree of interspecies functional conservation. Analysis of several deletions of FtsA-GFP suggests that multiple segments of FtsA are important for its localization to the FtsZ ring...
  25. ncbi request reprint Cell cycle arrest in Era GTPase mutants: a potential growth rate-regulated checkpoint in Escherichia coli
    R A Britton
    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 27:739-50. 1998
    ..Possible functions for Era in cell cycle progression and the initiation of cell division are discussed...
  26. ncbi request reprint A green light for the bacterial cytoskeleton
    W Margolin
    Dept of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    Trends Microbiol 6:233-8. 1998
    ..The dynamics and localization of some of these proteins reveal surprisingly cytoskeletal-like behavior...
  27. pmc Isolation of an ftsZ homolog from the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarium: implications for the evolution of FtsZ and tubulin
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 178:1320-7. 1996
    ..Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the H. salinarium FtsZ protein is more related to tubulins than are the FtsZ proteins of eubacteria, supporting the hypothesis that FtsZ may have evolved into eukaryotic tubulin...
  28. ncbi request reprint Green fluorescent protein as a reporter for macromolecular localization in bacterial cells
    W Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Methods 20:62-72. 2000
    ..These include fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for studying protein-protein interactions and specially engineered GFP constructs for direct determination of cellular ion fluxes...
  29. ncbi request reprint FtsZ exhibits rapid movement and oscillation waves in helix-like patterns in Escherichia coli
    Swapna Thanedar
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 14:1167-73. 2004
    ..The MreB helix was not required for the rapid movement of FtsZ or the oscillation of MinD. The results suggest that FtsZ not only forms the Z ring but also is part of a highly dynamic, potentially helical cytoskeleton in bacterial cells...
  30. pmc Effects of perturbing nucleoid structure on nucleoid occlusion-mediated toporegulation of FtsZ ring assembly
    Qin Sun
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:3951-9. 2004
    ..Although indirect effects are certainly possible with these experiments, the above data suggest that optimum NO activity may require specific organization and structure of the nucleoid...
  31. pmc A novel cytology-based, two-hybrid screen for bacteria applied to protein-protein interaction studies of a type IV secretion system
    Zhiyong Ding
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, The University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:5572-82. 2002
    ..Together, our findings establish a proof-of-concept for the use of cell-location-specific proteins for studies of interactions among cytosolic and membrane proteins in diverse bacterial species...
  32. pmc Adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of assembly of bacterial tubulin-like FtsZ by a hypermorph of bacterial actin-like FtsA
    Tushar K Beuria
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Biol Chem 284:14079-86. 2009
    ..These results indicate that a bacterial actin, when activated by adenine nucleotides, can modify the length distribution of bacterial tubulin polymers, analogous to the effects of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin on F-actin...
  33. pmc A gain-of-function mutation in ftsA bypasses the requirement for the essential cell division gene zipA in Escherichia coli
    Brett Geissler
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:4197-202. 2003
    ..This is an example of a complete functional replacement of an essential prokaryotic cell division protein by another and may explain why most bacteria can divide without an obvious ZipA homolog...
  34. ncbi request reprint A sweet sensor for size-conscious bacteria
    Daisuke Shiomi
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Cell 130:216-8. 2007
    ..Delaying cell division during rapid growth allows bacterial cells to become larger...
  35. ncbi request reprint Dimerization or oligomerization of the actin-like FtsA protein enhances the integrity of the cytokinetic Z ring
    Daisuke Shiomi
    Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 66:1396-415. 2007
    ..Therefore, we propose that FtsZ assembly is regulated by the extent of FtsA oligomerization...
  36. ncbi request reprint Evidence for functional overlap among multiple bacterial cell division proteins: compensating for the loss of FtsK
    Brett Geissler
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 58:596-612. 2005
    ..These findings suggest that the N-terminal domain of FtsK is normally involved in stability of the division protein machine and shares functional overlap with FtsQ, FtsB, FtsA, ZipA and FtsN...
  37. ncbi request reprint How do prokaryotic cells cycle?
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R768-70. 2004
    ..Consequently, an important question is how cell-cycle mechanisms and controls have evolved, particularly in the broader perspective of the three domains of life...
  38. pmc Exploring intracellular space: function of the Min system in round-shaped Escherichia coli
    Brian D Corbin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    EMBO J 21:1998-2008. 2002
    ..A new model for the spatial control of division planes by the Min system in round cells is proposed...
  39. ncbi request reprint Bacterial sporulation: FtsZ rings do the twist
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Curr Biol 12:R391-2. 2002
    ..New results suggest that the transition from medial to polar Z rings involves a dynamic FtsZ spiral structure that may transfer FtsZ from medial to polar sites...
  40. pmc Z-ring-independent interaction between a subdomain of FtsA and late septation proteins as revealed by a polar recruitment assay
    Brian D Corbin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:7736-44. 2004
    ..These results suggest that subdomain 1c of FtsA is a completely independent functional domain with an important role in interacting with a septation protein subassembly...
  41. ncbi request reprint The ftsA* gain-of-function allele of Escherichia coli and its effects on the stability and dynamics of the Z ring
    Brett Geissler
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Microbiology 153:814-25. 2007
    ..Finally, FtsA* interacted more strongly with FtsZ compared with FtsA in a yeast two-hybrid system. These results suggest that FtsA* interacts with FtsZ in a markedly different way compared with FtsA...
  42. ncbi request reprint Catching some Zs: a new protein for spatial regulation of bacterial cytokinesis
    William Margolin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Cell 117:850-1. 2004
    ..In this issue of Cell, Wu and Errington show that a specific nucleoid-associated protein mediates this nucleoid occlusion effect, providing the first mechanistic insight into this key spatial regulatory system...
  43. pmc Interaction between cell division proteins FtsE and FtsZ
    Brian D Corbin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:3026-35. 2007
    ..Coexpression of FLAG-FtsE and FtsX under certain conditions resulted in efficient formation of minicells, also consistent with an FtsE-FtsZ interaction and with the idea that FtsE and FtsX regulate the activity of the divisome...
  44. ncbi request reprint DNA enzyme generated by a novel single-stranded DNA expression vector inhibits expression of the essential bacterial cell division gene ftsZ
    Xin Xing Tan
    CytoGenix, Incorporated, Suite 140, 3100 Wilcrest, Houston, Texas 77042, USA
    Biochemistry 43:1111-7. 2004
    ....
  45. ncbi request reprint An altered FtsA can compensate for the loss of essential cell division protein FtsN in Escherichia coli
    Christophe S Bernard
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin St, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 64:1289-305. 2007
    ..The results strongly suggest that FtsA is conformationally flexible, and this flexibility is a key modulator of divisome function at all stages...
  46. pmc The C-terminal domain of MinC inhibits assembly of the Z ring in Escherichia coli
    Daisuke Shiomi
    Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:236-43. 2007
    ..These results suggest that the C-terminal half of MinC has an additional function in the regulation of Z-ring assembly...
  47. ncbi request reprint Effects of phospholipid composition on MinD-membrane interactions in vitro and in vivo
    Eugenia Mileykovskaya
    Department of Biochemistry, The University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:22193-8. 2003
    ..These results suggest that MinD has a preference for anionic phospholipids and that MinD oscillation behavior, and therefore cell division site selection, may be regulated by membrane phospholipid composition...
  48. pmc Changes in the Min oscillation pattern before and after cell birth
    Jennifer R Juarez
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 192:4134-42. 2010
    ..Finally, we observed regular end-to-end oscillation over very short distances along the long axes of minicells, supporting the importance of geometry in MinD localization...
  49. doi request reprint Compensation for the loss of the conserved membrane targeting sequence of FtsA provides new insights into its function
    Daisuke Shiomi
    Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    Mol Microbiol 67:558-69. 2008
    ..We propose that FtsA function in cell division depends on additive effects of membrane binding and self-interaction, and that the specific requirement of an amphipathic helix for tethering FtsA to the membrane can be bypassed...
  50. pmc DivIVA is required for polar growth in the MreB-lacking rod-shaped actinomycete Corynebacterium glutamicum
    Michal Letek
    Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Area de Microbiologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Leon, 24071 Leon, Spain
    J Bacteriol 190:3283-92. 2008
    ..DivIVA(Cg) localized at the septum after cell wall synthesis had started and the nucleoids had already segregated, suggesting that in C. glutamicum DivIVA is not involved in cell division or chromosome segregation...
  51. pmc Two Dictyostelium orthologs of the prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ localize to mitochondria and are required for the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology
    Paul R Gilson
    Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Victoria 3125, Australia
    Eukaryot Cell 2:1315-26. 2003
    ..This is the first demonstration of two differentially localized FtsZs within the one organelle, and it points to a divergence in the roles of these two proteins...
  52. ncbi request reprint Conservation of dynamic localization among MinD and MinE orthologues: oscillation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae proteins in Escherichia coli
    Sandra Ramirez-Arcos
    Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Mol Microbiol 46:493-504. 2002
    ..Finally, in round E. coli cells, GFP-MinDNg appeared to move in a plane parallel to completed septa. This pattern of movement is predicted to be similar in gonococcal cells, which also divide in alternating perpendicular planes...
  53. ncbi request reprint An experimentalist's guide to computational modelling of the Min system
    Karsten Kruse
    Max Planck Institut fur Physik komplexer Systeme, Nothnitzer Str 38, D 01187 Dresden, Germany
    Mol Microbiol 63:1279-84. 2007
    ..We also review the effects of fluctuations caused by low cellular concentration of Min proteins, and describe how stochastic effects may potentially influence Min protein dynamics...

Research Grants13

  1. Targeting and assembly of E. coli division proteins
    William Margolin; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This project investigates the molecular mechanism of bacterial cell division. The highly conserved proteins in the cell division apparatus represent novel targets for new therapeutics. ..
  2. Targeting and assembly of E. coli cell division proteins
    William Margolin; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The study of bacterial cell division is important not only because it is a basic cellular process that needs to be understood, but also because cytokinesis is an important potential target of antimicrobials. ..
  3. TARGETING AND ASSEMBLY OF E COLI CELL DIVISION PROTEINS
    William Margolin; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The results of this proposed research are expected to provide a more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell division, and should facilitate the isolation of new and better antimicrobial drug targets. ..
  4. Targeting and assembly of E. coli cell division proteins
    William Margolin; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The study of bacterial cell division is important not only because it is a basic cellular process that needs to be understood, but also because cytokinesis is an important potential target of antimicrobials. ..