Martin Adler

Summary

Affiliation: Temple University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Are chemokines the third major system in the brain?
    Martin W Adler
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:1204-9. 2005
  2. pmc Viewing chemokines as a third major system of communication in the brain
    Martin W Adler
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    AAPS J 7:E865-70. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Effect of a mu-opioid receptor-selective antagonist on interleukin-6 fever
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research and Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Life Sci 70:2139-45. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Splenic macrophages and B cells mediate immunosuppression following abrupt withdrawal from morphine
    Rahil T Rahim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:1185-91. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint The dynamic relationship between mu and kappa opioid receptors in body temperature regulation
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Life Sci 78:329-33. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of mu, kappa or delta opioids administered by pellet or pump on oral Salmonella infection and gastrointestinal transit
    Pu Feng
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Eur J Pharmacol 534:250-7. 2006
  7. pmc Rapid heterologous desensitization of antinociceptive activity between mu or delta opioid receptors and chemokine receptors in rats
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Drug Alcohol Depend 88:36-41. 2007
  8. pmc Nociceptin/orphanin FQ blocks the antinociception induced by mu, kappa and delta opioid agonists on the cold water tail-flick test
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, United States
    Eur J Pharmacol 557:32-6. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint A novel role of cannabinoids: implication in the fever induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide
    Khalid Benamar
    Center of Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 320:1127-33. 2007
  10. pmc The chemokine CX3CL1/fractalkine interferes with the antinociceptive effect induced by opioid agonists in the periaqueductal grey of rats
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Brain Res 1153:52-7. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications34

  1. ncbi request reprint Are chemokines the third major system in the brain?
    Martin W Adler
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:1204-9. 2005
    ..The chemokine system can thus be thought of as the third major transmitter system in the brain...
  2. pmc Viewing chemokines as a third major system of communication in the brain
    Martin W Adler
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    AAPS J 7:E865-70. 2005
    ..In this review, we propose that the endogenous chemokine system in the brain acts in concert with the neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems to govern brain function. It can thus be thought of as the third major system in the brain...
  3. ncbi request reprint Effect of a mu-opioid receptor-selective antagonist on interleukin-6 fever
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research and Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Life Sci 70:2139-45. 2002
    ..These data indicate that mu-opioid receptors within the POAH mediate IL-6 fever and add to the increasing evidence that the opioid system is involved in the pathogenesis of fever in rats...
  4. ncbi request reprint Splenic macrophages and B cells mediate immunosuppression following abrupt withdrawal from morphine
    Rahil T Rahim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:1185-91. 2005
    ..Overall, the data suggest that immunosuppression by AW spleen cells is a result of active suppression by macrophages and B cells...
  5. ncbi request reprint The dynamic relationship between mu and kappa opioid receptors in body temperature regulation
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Life Sci 78:329-33. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of mu, kappa or delta opioids administered by pellet or pump on oral Salmonella infection and gastrointestinal transit
    Pu Feng
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Eur J Pharmacol 534:250-7. 2006
    ..A delta1 opioid receptor agonist did not sensitize to infection, and a delta2 and a kappa opioid receptor agonist had minimal effects on either parameter...
  7. pmc Rapid heterologous desensitization of antinociceptive activity between mu or delta opioid receptors and chemokine receptors in rats
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Drug Alcohol Depend 88:36-41. 2007
    ....
  8. pmc Nociceptin/orphanin FQ blocks the antinociception induced by mu, kappa and delta opioid agonists on the cold water tail-flick test
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, United States
    Eur J Pharmacol 557:32-6. 2007
    ..5 microg), respectively. These results indicate that N/OFQ may be an endogenous anti-opioid peptide in the brain of rats in the CWT test...
  9. ncbi request reprint A novel role of cannabinoids: implication in the fever induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide
    Khalid Benamar
    Center of Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 320:1127-33. 2007
    ..The present results show that cannabinoids interact with systemic bacterial LPS injection and indicate a role of the CB1 receptor subtype in the pathogenesis of LPS fever...
  10. pmc The chemokine CX3CL1/fractalkine interferes with the antinociceptive effect induced by opioid agonists in the periaqueductal grey of rats
    Xiaohong Chen
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Brain Res 1153:52-7. 2007
    ..These results demonstrate that activation of the CX3CL1 receptor diminishes the effect of mu, delta and kappa opioid agonists on their receptors in the PAG of rats...
  11. pmc Anandamide and Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol directly inhibit cells of the immune system via CB2 receptors
    Toby K Eisenstein
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, United States
    J Neuroimmunol 189:17-22. 2007
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Deletion of mu-opioid receptor in mice alters the development of acute neuroinflammation
    Khalid Benamar
    Center of Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 323:990-4. 2007
    ....
  13. doi request reprint First in vivo evidence for a functional interaction between chemokine and cannabinoid systems in the brain
    Khalid Benamar
    Center of Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 325:641-5. 2008
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2 suppress in vitro antibody formation at ultra-low concentrations: anti-peptide antibodies but not opioid antagonists block the activity
    Benito Anton
    Molecular Neurobiology and Addictive Neurochemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Psychiatry, Mexico City, Mexico
    Brain Behav Immun 22:824-32. 2008
    ..These studies show that the endomorphins are immunomodulatory at ultra-low concentrations, but the data do not support a mechanism involving the mu-opioid receptor...
  15. pmc Bi-directional heterologous desensitization between the major HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 and the kappa-opioid receptor
    Matthew J Finley
    Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Neuroimmunol 197:114-23. 2008
    ..These results have implications for several essential processes including neuronal and lymphocyte development, inflammatory responses, and pain/sensitivity...
  16. ncbi request reprint Morphine withdrawal sensitizes mice to lipopolysaccharide: elevated TNF-alpha and nitric oxide with decreased IL-12
    Pu Feng
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Neuroimmunol 164:57-65. 2005
    ..Anti-TNF-alpha antibody given prior to LPS challenge afforded significant protection to morphine-withdrawn animals. These studies show that morphine withdrawal sensitizes to LPS lethality via increased production of TNF-alpha...
  17. pmc Unresponsiveness of mu-opioid receptor knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide-induced fever
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Br J Pharmacol 144:1029-31. 2005
    ..p. of LPS did not induce fever during the recording period. Saline by itself, given i.p., did not alter the T(b), either in WT or MOR-KO. These results confirm that the mu-opioid system is involved in LPS-induced fever...
  18. ncbi request reprint CB1 receptors in the preoptic anterior hypothalamus regulate WIN 55212-2 [(4,5-dihydro-2-methyl-4(4-morpholinylmethyl)-1-(1-naphthalenyl-carbonyl)-6H-pyrrolo[3,2,1ij]quinolin-6-one]-induced hypothermia
    Scott M Rawls
    Department of Pharmacology, Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3420 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 301:963-8. 2002
    ..Moreover, the present data suggest that 1) the POAH is the central locus for thermoregulation, and 2) CB(1) receptors within the POAH are the primary mediators of cannabinoid-induced hypothermia...
  19. ncbi request reprint Abrupt or precipitated withdrawal from morphine induces immunosuppression
    Rahil T Rahim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Neuroimmunol 127:88-95. 2002
    ..However, the kinetics of onset and recovery from immunosuppression were different in AW and PW...
  20. pmc Heterologous desensitization of opioid receptors by chemokines inhibits chemotaxis and enhances the perception of pain
    Imre Szabo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:10276-81. 2002
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Role of the nitric oxide pathway in kappa-opioid-induced hypothermia in rats
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research and Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 303:375-8. 2002
    ..c.v.) caused a significant suppression of U50,488H hypothermia. The results indicate that either central or peripheral nitric oxide synthesis is required for the production of hypothermia induced by U50,488H...
  22. ncbi request reprint N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists and WIN 55212-2 [4,5-dihydro-2-methyl-4(4-morpholinylmethyl)-1-(1-naphthalenyl-carbonyl)-6H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-i,j]quinolin-6-one], a cannabinoid agonist, interact to produce synergistic hypothermia
    S M Rawls
    Department of Pharmacology and Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 303:395-402. 2002
    ..Taken together, these data suggest that interactions between NMDA and CB(1) receptors produce synergistic hypothermia...
  23. ncbi request reprint NMDA receptors modulate morphine-induced hyperthermia
    Scott M Rawls
    Department of Pharmacology and Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Brain Res 984:76-83. 2003
    ..These data indicate that NMDA receptors modulate morphine-induced hyperthermia and suggest that increases in glutamatergic transmission maximize the hyperthermia evoked by morphine...
  24. ncbi request reprint Role of the nitric-oxide synthase isoforms during morphine-induced hyperthermia in rats
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 307:219-22. 2003
    ..L-NIO (10-20 mg/kg) or AG (50 mg/kg) had no effect on Tb. These results suggest the involvement of nNOS in morphine-induced hyperthermia...
  25. doi request reprint Elevated level of the proinflammatory chemokine, RANTES/CCL5, in the periaqueductal grey causes hyperalgesia in rats
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research CSAR, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Eur J Pharmacol 592:93-5. 2008
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint L-NAME (N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor, and WIN 55212-2 [4,5-dihydro-2-methyl-4(4-morpholinylmethyl)-1-(1-naphthalenyl-carbonyl)-6H-pyrrolo[3,2,1ij]quinolin-6-one], a cannabinoid agonist, interact to evoke synerg
    S M Rawls
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 308:780-6. 2004
    ..The present data are the first evidence that drug combinations of NOS blockers and cannabinoid agonists produce synergistic hypothermia. Thus, NO and cannabinoid systems may interact to induce superadditive hypothermia...
  27. ncbi request reprint Intrahypothalamic injection of deltorphin-II alters body temperature in rats
    Khalid Benamar
    Center for Substance Abuse Research and Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Brain Res 1019:22-7. 2004
    ..Delta-1 opioid receptors do not appear to be involved in the control of body temperature...
  28. ncbi request reprint Paradoxes of immunosuppression in mouse models of withdrawal
    Rahil T Rahim
    Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Neuroimmunol 147:114-20. 2004
    ..Thus evidence for both suppressed and activated macrophages has been obtained in mice 24 h after abrupt withdrawal from morphine...
  29. ncbi request reprint GABAA receptors modulate cannabinoid-evoked hypothermia
    S M Rawls
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, 3307 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 78:83-91. 2004
    ..Our results implicate GABA(A) receptors in the hypothermic actions of cannabinoids and provide further evidence of a functional link between cannabinoid and GABA systems...
  30. ncbi request reprint Win 55212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, attenuates leukocyte/endothelial interactions in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model
    Xiang Ni
    Department of Physiology, Temple University, 3420 N Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Mult Scler 10:158-64. 2004
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Sigma sites mediate DTG-evoked hypothermia in rats
    S M Rawls
    Department of Pharmacology and Center for Substance Abuse Research, Temple University School of Medicine, 3420 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 73:779-86. 2002
    ..Moreover, these data provide further evidence that BD 1047 is an effective antagonist for characterizing sigma-mediated effects in vivo...
  32. pmc Increased sensitivity to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice undergoing withdrawal from morphine is associated with suppression of interleukin-12
    Pu Feng
    Center for Substance Abuse, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    Infect Immun 73:7953-9. 2005
    ..These studies show a correlation between the suppression of IL-12 production and a heightened susceptibility to Salmonella infection in mice undergoing withdrawal from morphine...
  33. pmc Cannabinoid CB(2) receptor activation decreases cerebral infarction in a mouse focal ischemia/reperfusion model
    Ming Zhang
    Department of Physiology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140, USA
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:1387-96. 2007
    ..05). CB(2) activation is associated with a reduction in white blood cell rolling and adhesion along cerebral vascular endothelial cells, a reduction in infarct size, and improved motor function after transient focal ischemia...
  34. ncbi request reprint Withdrawal from morphine in mice suppresses splenic macrophage function, cytokine production, and costimulatory molecules
    Rahil T Rahim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3400 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
    J Neuroimmunol 144:16-27. 2003
    ..Addition of IL-1beta or IFN-gamma to AW cultures was able to reverse their immunosuppression. These results strongly suggest that morphine withdrawal results in a deficit of macrophage function...

Research Grants26

  1. CONFERENCE--COLLEGE ON PROBLEMS OF DRUG DEPENDENCE
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..As has been done for many years, the Proceedings will be published as an archival NIDA monograph and will be mailed to all meeting registrants and to all NIDA grantees. ..
  2. Opioids,Cannabinoids,Chemokines:Neuroimmune Interactions
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Conference-College on Problems of Drug Dependence
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Submitted abstracts are reviewed and divided into poster and oral sessions to insure a balance with the chosen symposia representative of the various research facets of the drug abuse and addiction field. ..
  4. Opioids, Cannabinoids, Chemokines: Functional Implications of Cross-Talk
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  5. Opioids, Cannabinoids, Chemokines: Functional Implications of Cross-Talk
    Martin W Adler; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  6. OPIOIDS, OPIOID RECEPTORS, AND IMMUNE COMPETENCE
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Such studies are especially timely in view of the connection between IV drug abuse and AIDS...
  7. OPIOIDS, OPIOID RECEPTORS, AND IMMUNE COMPETENCE
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ....
  8. Opioids, Cannabinoids, Chemokines: Functional Implications of Cross-Talk
    Martin Adler; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....