Biren A Patel

Summary

Affiliation: Stony Brook University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Dynamic pressure patterns in the hands of olive baboons (Papio anubis) during terrestrial locomotion: implications for cercopithecoid primate hand morphology
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293:710-8. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Electromyography of wrist and finger flexor muscles in olive baboons (Papio anubis)
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:115-23. 2012
  3. doi request reprint New primate first metatarsals from the Paleogene of Egypt and the origin of the anthropoid big toe
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:99-120. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Functional morphology of cercopithecoid primate metacarpals
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:320-37. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Terrestrial adaptations in the hands of Equatorius africanus revisited
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:763-72. 2009
  6. doi request reprint The interplay between speed, kinetics, and hand postures during primate terrestrial locomotion
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:222-34. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Bone density spatial patterns in the distal radius reflect habitual hand postures adopted by quadrupedal primates
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:130-41. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Comparative functional morphology of the primate peroneal process
    Rachel L Jacobs
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:721-31. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Hallucal grasping in Nycticebus coucang: further implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Amanda K Kingston
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:33-42. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Telemetered electromyography of peroneus longus in Varecia variegata and Eulemur rubriventer: implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Doug M Boyer
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, T8 040 Health Science Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:119-34. 2007

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. doi request reprint Dynamic pressure patterns in the hands of olive baboons (Papio anubis) during terrestrial locomotion: implications for cercopithecoid primate hand morphology
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293:710-8. 2010
    ..Such dynamic changes in palmar pressure likely moderate strain in the gracile bones of the hand, a structure that is integral not only for locomotion, but also feeding and social behaviors in primates...
  2. doi request reprint Electromyography of wrist and finger flexor muscles in olive baboons (Papio anubis)
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:115-23. 2012
    ..Rather, digitigrady in primates appears to be related to energetic efficiency for walking long distances...
  3. doi request reprint New primate first metatarsals from the Paleogene of Egypt and the origin of the anthropoid big toe
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:99-120. 2012
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Functional morphology of cercopithecoid primate metacarpals
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:320-37. 2010
    ..Therefore, the lack of identifiable adaptations for specific hand postures in extant cercopithecoids makes it difficult to determine a preference for specific habitats from fossil primate hand bones...
  5. doi request reprint Terrestrial adaptations in the hands of Equatorius africanus revisited
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:763-72. 2009
    ..It is likely that the terrestrial specialization utilized by living hominoids, e.g., knuckle-walking, evolved separately...
  6. doi request reprint The interplay between speed, kinetics, and hand postures during primate terrestrial locomotion
    Biren A Patel
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:222-34. 2010
    ..Thus, a digitigrade hand posture is not a cursorial (i.e. high speed) adaptation in primates and differs from that of other mammals...
  7. ncbi request reprint Bone density spatial patterns in the distal radius reflect habitual hand postures adopted by quadrupedal primates
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:130-41. 2007
    ..This has implications for understanding the functional morphology and evolution of knuckle-walking and digitigrade hand postures in primates...
  8. doi request reprint Comparative functional morphology of the primate peroneal process
    Rachel L Jacobs
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:721-31. 2009
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Hallucal grasping in Nycticebus coucang: further implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Amanda K Kingston
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:33-42. 2010
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Telemetered electromyography of peroneus longus in Varecia variegata and Eulemur rubriventer: implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Doug M Boyer
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, T8 040 Health Science Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:119-34. 2007
    ..Thus, the functional significance of this hallmark, euprimate feature remains to be determined...
  11. ncbi request reprint The hominoid proximal radius: re-interpreting locomotor behaviors in early hominins
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:415-32. 2005
    ..Furthermore, inferences of function from form in extinct hominins can be drastically affected by the comparative outgroup selection. A re-evaluation of the functional morphology of the proximal radius in early hominins is addressed...
  12. ncbi request reprint Cercopithecoid cervical vertebral morphology and implications for the presence of Theropithecus in early Pleistocene Europe
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:113-29. 2007
    ..These findings have important implications for recent interpretations of the nature of Theropithecus dispersal out of Africa...
  13. doi request reprint Metatarsal fusion pattern and developmental morphology of the Olduvai Hominid 8 foot: Evidence of adolescence
    Randall L Susman
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:58-69. 2011
    ..The proposition that OH 8 belonged to an adult is unsupported by morphology, including radiographic evidence, and the fusion sequences in human and chimpanzee skeletal material reported here and in the literature...
  14. pmc Habitual use of the primate forelimb is reflected in the material properties of subchondral bone in the distal radius
    Kristian J Carlson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, USA
    J Anat 208:659-70. 2006
    ..tensile or non-weight-bearing regimes indicates that subchondral apparent density in the distal radial articular surface distinguishes modes of habitually supporting of body mass...
  15. ncbi request reprint Body mass distribution and gait mechanics in fat-tailed dwarf lemurs (Cheirogaleus medius) and patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas)
    Jesse W Young
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:26-40. 2007
    ..These results suggest that body mass distribution is unlikely to be the sole determinant of footfall pattern in primates and other mammals...
  16. ncbi request reprint Dental metric comparisons of Morotopithecus and Afropithecus: implications for the validity of the genus Morotopithecus
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:506-12. 2006
    ..05). In light of these results and other currently available cranial evidence, we suggest that the type specimens of Morotopithecus and Afropithecus are not different enough to support taxonomic distinction...
  17. ncbi request reprint Form and function of the oblique cord (chorda obliqua) in anthropoid primates
    Biren A Patel
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, SBS Building, Room S 501, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Primates 46:47-57. 2005
    ..Therefore, the function of the oblique cord in anthropoid primates suggests that its presence in modern humans may be a morphological and functional remnant from a quadrupedal ancestry...