S G Larson

Summary

Affiliation: Stony Brook University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Homo floresiensis and the evolution of the hominin shoulder
    Susan G Larson
    Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:718-31. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint The primitive wrist of Homo floresiensis and its implications for hominin evolution
    Matthew W Tocheri
    Human Origins Program, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013, USA
    Science 317:1743-5. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Rotator cuff muscle function and its relation to scapular morphology in apes
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 65:391-403. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Descriptions of the upper limb skeleton of Homo floresiensis
    S G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:555-70. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Hip extensor EMG and forelimb/hind limb weight support asymmetry in primate quadrupeds
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:343-55. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Humeral retractor EMG during quadrupedal walking in primates
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:1204-15. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Maintenance of above-branch balance during primate arboreal quadrupedalism: coordinated use of forearm rotators and tail motion
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, New York 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 129:71-81. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Telemetered electromyography of the supinators and pronators of the forearm in gibbons and chimpanzees: implications for the fundamental positional adaptation of hominoids
    J T Stern
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 115:253-68. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Patterns of strain in the macaque ulna during functional activity
    B Demes
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, State University of New York, Stony Brook 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 106:87-100. 1998
  10. doi request reprint Descriptions of the lower limb skeleton of Homo floresiensis
    W L Jungers
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:538-54. 2009

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. ncbi request reprint Homo floresiensis and the evolution of the hominin shoulder
    Susan G Larson
    Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:718-31. 2007
    ..Similar morphology in the Homo erectus Nariokotome boy (KNM-WT 15000) suggests that this shoulder configuration may represent a transitional stage in pectoral girdle evolution in the human lineage...
  2. ncbi request reprint The primitive wrist of Homo floresiensis and its implications for hominin evolution
    Matthew W Tocheri
    Human Origins Program, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013, USA
    Science 317:1743-5. 2007
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Rotator cuff muscle function and its relation to scapular morphology in apes
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 65:391-403. 2013
    ..A possible explanation for the disparity between fossa and muscle size relates to the underappreciated role of the scapular spine in structural reinforcement of the blade. ..
  4. doi request reprint Descriptions of the upper limb skeleton of Homo floresiensis
    S G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:555-70. 2009
    ..The upper limb presents a unique mosaic of derived (human-like) and primitive morphologies, the combination of which is never found in either healthy or pathological modern humans...
  5. doi request reprint Hip extensor EMG and forelimb/hind limb weight support asymmetry in primate quadrupeds
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:343-55. 2009
    ..This lends support to Reynolds' suggestion that some primates use muscles to actively shift weight onto hind limbs to relieve stresses on forelimbs less well structured for weight support...
  6. ncbi request reprint Humeral retractor EMG during quadrupedal walking in primates
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:1204-15. 2007
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Maintenance of above-branch balance during primate arboreal quadrupedalism: coordinated use of forearm rotators and tail motion
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, New York 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 129:71-81. 2006
    ..The usefulness of a long tail as a balancing aid during arboreal locomotion highlights the puzzling nature of the evolutionary loss of a tail in the ape and human lineage...
  8. ncbi request reprint Telemetered electromyography of the supinators and pronators of the forearm in gibbons and chimpanzees: implications for the fundamental positional adaptation of hominoids
    J T Stern
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 115:253-68. 2001
    ..Since the greater range of forearm rotation characterizing apes is also best explained by adaptation to this behavior, we join previous authors who assert that it lies at the very origin of the Hominoidea...
  9. ncbi request reprint Patterns of strain in the macaque ulna during functional activity
    B Demes
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, State University of New York, Stony Brook 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 106:87-100. 1998
    ..The lack of buttressing in the loaded plane and the somewhat counterintuitive bending direction recommend caution with regard to conventional interpretations of long bone cross-sectional geometry...
  10. doi request reprint Descriptions of the lower limb skeleton of Homo floresiensis
    W L Jungers
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:538-54. 2009
    ..The metatarsus has a human-like robusticity formula, but the proximal pedal phalanges are relatively long and robust (and slightly curved). The hallux is fully adducted, but we suspect that a medial longitudinal arch was absent...
  11. ncbi request reprint Uniqueness of primate forelimb posture during quadrupedal locomotion
    S G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 112:87-101. 2000
    ..It is suggested that these features are components of functional adaptations to locomotion in an arboreal habitat, using clawless, grasping extremities...
  12. doi request reprint The foot of Homo floresiensis
    W L Jungers
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    Nature 459:81-4. 2009
    ..These new findings raise the possibility that the ancestor of H. floresiensis was not Homo erectus but instead some other, more primitive, hominin whose dispersal into southeast Asia is still undocumented...
  13. ncbi request reprint Patterns of strain in the macaque tibia during functional activity
    B Demes
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 116:257-65. 2001
    ..1998] Am J Phys Anthropol 106:87-100). Peak strains for both the tibia and the ulna are moderate in comparison to strains recorded during walking and galloping activities in nonprimate mammals...
  14. ncbi request reprint The definition of humeral torsion: a comment on Rhodes (2006)
    Susan G Larson
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:819-20; discussion 820-1. 2007
  15. ncbi request reprint Telemetered electromyography of peroneus longus in Varecia variegata and Eulemur rubriventer: implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Doug M Boyer
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, T8 040 Health Science Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 8081, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:119-34. 2007
    ..Thus, the functional significance of this hallmark, euprimate feature remains to be determined...
  16. ncbi request reprint Compliant walking in primates: elbow and knee yield in primates compared to other mammals
    Eileen Larney
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 4364, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 125:42-50. 2004
    ..However, limb compliance (as reflected by elbow or knee yield) does not appear to be exclusive to the primate order...
  17. doi request reprint Hallucal grasping in Nycticebus coucang: further implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process
    Amanda K Kingston
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:33-42. 2010
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of force and power production in unsteady ricochetal brachiation
    James R Usherwood
    Department of Food, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 120:364-72. 2003
    ..Of these possibilities, leg-lifting and arm-flexing were observed as mechanisms of adding mechanical energy. Net energy loss, and substantial torques about the shoulder, were not observed...