P L Ogra

Summary

Affiliation: State University of New York at Buffalo
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Ageing and its possible impact on mucosal immune responses
    Pearay L Ogra
    Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Medicine and Women and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, 219 Bryant Street, Buffalo, NY, United States
    Ageing Res Rev 9:101-6. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Effects of early environment on mucosal immunologic homeostasis, subsequent immune responses and disease outcome
    Pearay L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Medicine, and Women and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
    Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program 61:145-81. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Respiratory syncytial virus: the virus, the disease and the immune response
    Pearay L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Children s Hospital of Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
    Paediatr Respir Rev 5:S119-26. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Mucosal immunity: some historical perspective on host-pathogen interactions and implications for mucosal vaccines
    Pearay L Ogra
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, USA
    Immunol Cell Biol 81:23-33. 2003
  5. pmc Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses
    P L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, State University of New York at Buffalo, and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14222, USA
    Clin Microbiol Rev 14:430-45. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint The release of leukotrienes in the respiratory tract during infection with respiratory syncytial virus: role in obstructive airway disease
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo
    Pediatr Res 24:504-7. 1988
  7. ncbi request reprint Release of leukotriene C4 in respiratory tract during acute viral infection
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo
    J Pediatr 112:218-22. 1988
  8. ncbi request reprint Relationship between leukotriene C4 and an uteroglobin-like protein in nasal and tracheobronchial mucosa of children. Implication in acute respiratory illnesses
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo
    Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 86:420-5. 1988
  9. pmc Respiratory syncytial virus-specific antibody responses in immunoglobulin A and E isotypes to the F and G proteins and to intact virus after natural infection
    R C Welliver
    Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York, Buffalo
    J Clin Microbiol 27:295-9. 1989
  10. ncbi request reprint Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (not T helper type 2 cytokines) is associated with severe forms of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis
    R P Garofalo
    Division of Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77550, USA
    J Infect Dis 184:393-9. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. doi request reprint Ageing and its possible impact on mucosal immune responses
    Pearay L Ogra
    Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Medicine and Women and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, 219 Bryant Street, Buffalo, NY, United States
    Ageing Res Rev 9:101-6. 2010
    ..The role of mucosal microflora and other environmental macromolecules in the regulation of mucosal immunity relative to the process of ageing will also be reviewed...
  2. doi request reprint Effects of early environment on mucosal immunologic homeostasis, subsequent immune responses and disease outcome
    Pearay L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Medicine, and Women and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
    Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program 61:145-81. 2008
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Respiratory syncytial virus: the virus, the disease and the immune response
    Pearay L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Children s Hospital of Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
    Paediatr Respir Rev 5:S119-26. 2004
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Mucosal immunity: some historical perspective on host-pathogen interactions and implications for mucosal vaccines
    Pearay L Ogra
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, USA
    Immunol Cell Biol 81:23-33. 2003
  5. pmc Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses
    P L Ogra
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, State University of New York at Buffalo, and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14222, USA
    Clin Microbiol Rev 14:430-45. 2001
    ..Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans...
  6. ncbi request reprint The release of leukotrienes in the respiratory tract during infection with respiratory syncytial virus: role in obstructive airway disease
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo
    Pediatr Res 24:504-7. 1988
    ..abstract truncated at 250 words)..
  7. ncbi request reprint Release of leukotriene C4 in respiratory tract during acute viral infection
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo
    J Pediatr 112:218-22. 1988
    ..Thus development of virus-induced bronchospasm may be related in part to direct mucosal cell-virus interaction and the release of pharmacologically active mediators in the respiratory tract...
  8. ncbi request reprint Relationship between leukotriene C4 and an uteroglobin-like protein in nasal and tracheobronchial mucosa of children. Implication in acute respiratory illnesses
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo
    Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 86:420-5. 1988
    ..An inverse correlation between the concentrations of LTC4 and UTG-LP in NPS and TBS was demonstrated...
  9. pmc Respiratory syncytial virus-specific antibody responses in immunoglobulin A and E isotypes to the F and G proteins and to intact virus after natural infection
    R C Welliver
    Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York, Buffalo
    J Clin Microbiol 27:295-9. 1989
    ..While neither protein subunit had the ideal characteristics of inducing an IgA response in the absence of an IgE response, the F protein seems to be a better candidate for use as a vaccine, on the basis of better IgA/IgE ratios...
  10. ncbi request reprint Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (not T helper type 2 cytokines) is associated with severe forms of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis
    R P Garofalo
    Division of Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77550, USA
    J Infect Dis 184:393-9. 2001
    ..MIP-1alpha and MCP-1 levels also were inversely related to oxygen saturation (P<.005). Thus, the severity of RSV bronchiolitis appears to be related more to chemokine release than to Th2 cytokine production...
  11. ncbi request reprint Activation of human eosinophils in vitro by respiratory syncytial virus
    J L Kimpen
    School of Medicine, State University of New York, Buffalo
    Pediatr Res 32:160-4. 1992
    ..16 +/- 1.04 versus 4.2 +/- 1.3 ng leukotriene C4/1 x 10(6) cells) (p less than 0.005). These findings indicate that RSV can activate or prime eosinophils to release various inflammatory mediators.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)..
  12. ncbi request reprint Severe human lower respiratory tract illness caused by respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus is characterized by the absence of pulmonary cytotoxic lymphocyte responses
    Timothy P Welliver
    MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD, USA
    J Infect Dis 195:1126-36. 2007
    ..It is widely believed that both viral replication and inappropriately enhanced immune responses contribute to disease severity. In infants, RSV LRTI is known to be more severe than influenza virus LRTI...
  13. ncbi request reprint Arachidonic acid metabolites in middle ear effusions of children
    L Brodsky
    Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York, School of Medicine, Buffalo
    Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 100:589-92. 1991
    ..Leukotriene B4 is the most frequently detected AA metabolite in MEEs and is highly associated with the presence of viable bacteria...
  14. ncbi request reprint Leukotriene C4 release in upper respiratory mucosa during natural exposure to ragweed in ragweed-sensitive children
    B Volovitz
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 82:414-8. 1988
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Respiratory syncytial virus infection of human respiratory epithelial cells up-regulates class I MHC expression through the induction of IFN-beta and IL-1 alpha
    R Garofalo
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77555, USA
    J Immunol 157:2506-13. 1996
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Production of interferon gamma in respiratory syncytial virus infection of humans is not associated with interleukins 12 and 18
    Roberto P Garofalo
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA
    J Med Virol 73:289-94. 2004
    ..Immune responses characterized by relatively greater release of IL18 may be associated with milder forms of bronchiolitis...
  17. ncbi request reprint In vivo effects of bifidobacteria and lactoferrin on gut endotoxin concentration and mucosal immunity in Balb/c mice
    Elizabeth A Griffiths
    Department of Pediatrics, The Women and Children s Hospital of Buffalo, Kaleida Health, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, 888 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14209, USA
    Dig Dis Sci 49:579-89. 2004
    ..Bifidobacteria and lactoferrin were well tolerated as dietary supplements and showed promising potential to reduce gut endotoxin levels...
  18. ncbi request reprint Beta-chemokines, but neither T helper type 1 nor T helper type 2 cytokines, correlate with severity of illness during respiratory syncytial virus infection
    Robert C Welliver
    Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Children s Hospital of Buffalo, USA
    Pediatr Infect Dis J 21:457-61. 2002
  19. ncbi request reprint A comparison of epidemiologic and immunologic features of bronchiolitis caused by influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus
    Roberto P Garofalo
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA
    J Med Virol 75:282-9. 2005
    ....