Frederick E Grine

Summary

Affiliation: State University of New York
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint An evaluation of dental radiograph accuracy in the measurement of enamel thickness
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Arch Oral Biol 46:1117-25. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Late Pleistocene human skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa, and modern human origins
    F E Grine
    Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Science 315:226-9. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Molar enamel thickness in the chacma baboon, Papio ursinus (Kerr 1792)
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 128:812-22. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Molar microwear in Praeanthropus afarensis: evidence for dietary stasis through time and under diverse paleoecological conditions
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:297-319. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Enamel thickness of deciduous and permanent molars in modern Homo sapiens
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 4364, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:14-31. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Error rates in dental microwear quantification using scanning electron microscopy
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook 11794 4364, USA
    Scanning 24:144-53. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Additional human remains from Blombos Cave, South Africa: (1999-2000 excavations)
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 42:293-302. 2002
  8. doi request reprint Viewpoints: feeding mechanics, diet, and dietary adaptations in early hominins
    David J Daegling
    Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32605, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:356-71. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Craniofacial biomechanics and functional and dietary inferences in hominin paleontology
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:293-308. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Dental microwear and diets of African early Homo
    Peter S Ungar
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
    J Hum Evol 50:78-95. 2006

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. ncbi request reprint An evaluation of dental radiograph accuracy in the measurement of enamel thickness
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Arch Oral Biol 46:1117-25. 2001
    ..Quantitative data on enamel thickness from studies that have employed lateral radiographs should be viewed with circumspection...
  2. ncbi request reprint Late Pleistocene human skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa, and modern human origins
    F E Grine
    Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Science 315:226-9. 2007
    ..The Hofmeyr cranium is consistent with the hypothesis that UP Eurasians descended from a population that emigrated from sub-Saharan Africa in the Late Pleistocene...
  3. ncbi request reprint Molar enamel thickness in the chacma baboon, Papio ursinus (Kerr 1792)
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 128:812-22. 2005
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Molar microwear in Praeanthropus afarensis: evidence for dietary stasis through time and under diverse paleoecological conditions
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, NY 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:297-319. 2006
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Enamel thickness of deciduous and permanent molars in modern Homo sapiens
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 4364, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:14-31. 2005
    ..The present data suggest that the human dentition is not predisposed to develop a helicoidal wear plane through the disposition of molar enamel thickness...
  6. ncbi request reprint Error rates in dental microwear quantification using scanning electron microscopy
    F E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook 11794 4364, USA
    Scanning 24:144-53. 2002
    ..In view of the error introduced by the use of different methods, we suggest that a consistent technique, such as offered by the Microware software package, be adopted by current researchers to establish a common microwear database...
  7. ncbi request reprint Additional human remains from Blombos Cave, South Africa: (1999-2000 excavations)
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, 11794, USA
    J Hum Evol 42:293-302. 2002
    ..The morphology of the Blombos Cave di is comparable to MSA homologues from the nearby, and presumably somewhat younger site of Die Kelders Cave 1...
  8. doi request reprint Viewpoints: feeding mechanics, diet, and dietary adaptations in early hominins
    David J Daegling
    Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32605, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:356-71. 2013
    ..Such a perspective helps to inject consideration of mechanobiological principles of bone formation into paleontological inferences. Finite element analysis must employ such principles to become an effective research tool in this context...
  9. doi request reprint Craniofacial biomechanics and functional and dietary inferences in hominin paleontology
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:293-308. 2010
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Dental microwear and diets of African early Homo
    Peter S Ungar
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
    J Hum Evol 50:78-95. 2006
    ..erectus and Swartkrans Member 1 individuals ate, at least occasionally, more brittle or tough items than other fossil hominins studied...
  11. doi request reprint Premolar microwear and tooth use in Australopithecus afarensis
    Lucas K Delezene
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
    J Hum Evol 65:282-93. 2013
    ..In sum, these results provide no evidence that A. afarensis routinely loaded either its premolars or molars to process hard objects or that A. afarensis P3 function changed over time...
  12. pmc Molar microwear textures and the diets of Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis
    Peter S Ungar
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Old Main 330, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:3345-54. 2010
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Further new hominin fossils from the Kibish Formation, southwestern Ethiopia
    Osbjorn M Pearson
    Department of Anthropology, MSC 01 1040, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:444-7. 2008
    ..The other specimens derive from Chad's Hominid Site (CHS), and derive from either Member III or IV, which constrains their age between approximately 8.6 and approximately 104 ka...
  14. doi request reprint Dental microwear and stable isotopes inform the paleoecology of extinct hominins
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:285-317. 2012
    ..boisei). The dietary signals derived from microwear and isotope chemistry are sometimes at odds with inferences from biomechanical approaches, a potentially disquieting conundrum that is particularly evident for several species...
  15. ncbi request reprint Molar microwear and dietary reconstructions of fossil cercopithecoidea from the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of South Africa
    Sireen El-Zaatari
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 49:180-205. 2005
    ..Finally, the microwear analyses suggest that the extinct cercopithecoid species did not necessarily have diets similar to those of their closest living relatives...
  16. ncbi request reprint The enigmatic molar from Gondolin, South Africa: implications for Paranthropus paleobiology
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:597-609. 2012
    ..robustus. This, in turn, suggests that large, presumptive male, specimens are rare, and that the levels of size variation (sexual dimorphism) previously ascribed to this species are likely to be gross underestimates...
  17. doi request reprint Morphometric variation in the papionin muzzle and the biochronology of the South African Plio-Pleistocene karst cave deposits
    Christopher C Gilbert
    Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8277, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:418-29. 2010
    ..The suggestion that the muzzle morphology of fossil papionins attests to a considerable and previously unrecognized temporal depth of the South African karst cave sites is unwarranted...
  18. doi request reprint Size variation in early human mandibles and molars from Klasies River, South Africa: comparison with other middle and late Pleistocene assemblages and with modern humans
    Danielle F Royer
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:312-23. 2009
    ..These results suggest that the reduced levels of dimorphism in Neandertals and living humans may have developed independently, though larger fossil samples are needed to test this hypothesis...
  19. doi request reprint Sex at Sterkfontein: 'Mrs. Ples' is still an adult female
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 62:593-604. 2012
    ..There is no evidence to contradict the assertion that 'Mrs. Ples' is an adult female...
  20. doi request reprint Reconstruction of the late Pleistocene human skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa
    Frederick E Grine
    Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 59:1-15. 2010
    ..This reconstruction provides a more complete picture of the Hofmeyr cranium and serves as a basis for more comprehensive morphometric comparisons...
  21. doi request reprint Observations on Middle Stone Age human teeth from Klasies River Main Site, South Africa
    Frederick E Grine
    Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 4364, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:750-8. 2012
    ..The sizes of most of the recently identified human teeth from Klasies seem to affirm at least one arguable aspect of morphometric modernity in the MSA at this site in the form of a tendency for tooth size reduction...
  22. ncbi request reprint Inferring hominoid and early hominid phylogeny using craniodental characters: the role of fossil taxa
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY, 12222, USA
    J Hum Evol 47:399-452. 2004
    ..garhi is either the sister taxon or direct ancestor of the genus Homo. Phylogenetic relationships indicate that Australopithecus is paraphyletic. Thus, A. anamensis and A. garhi should be allocated to new genera...
  23. pmc Isotopic evidence of early hominin diets
    Matt Sponheimer
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:10513-8. 2013
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Seasonal mortality patterns in non-human primates: implications for variation in selection pressures across environments
    Jan F Gogarten
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    Evolution 66:3252-66. 2012
    ..Applied to a wider array of taxa, analyses of seasonal mortality patterns may aid understanding of life-history evolution and selection pressures acting across a broad spectrum of environments and spatial and temporal scales...
  25. ncbi request reprint Assessment of the accuracy of dental enamel thickness measurements using microfocal X-ray computed tomography
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Interdepartmental Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 288:263-75. 2006
    ..10 mm) is difficult to resolve adequately in raw mCT images based on pixel values alone. Therefore, caution must be exercised in the application of mCT to the study of fossilized teeth...
  26. doi request reprint A description of the Omo I postcranial skeleton, including newly discovered fossils
    Osbjorn M Pearson
    Department of Anthropology, MSC 01 1040, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:421-37. 2008
    ..The morphology of the auricular surface of the os coxae suggests a young adult age...
  27. ncbi request reprint Dental microwear texture analysis shows within-species diet variability in fossil hominins
    Robert S Scott
    1 Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA 2 These authors contributed equally to this work
    Nature 436:693-5. 2005
    ..africanus. This suggests that A. africanus ate more tough foods and P. robustus consumed more hard and brittle items, but that both had variable and overlapping diets...
  28. doi request reprint Cladistic analysis of early Homo crania from Swartkrans and Sterkfontein, South Africa
    Heather F Smith
    School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, P O Box 872402, Tempe, AZ 85287 2402, United States
    J Hum Evol 54:684-704. 2008
    ..In no case was an exclusive sister relationship between either South African OTU and a particular species of Homo supported statistically. Both South African OTUs differ from H. habilis in the fewest number of cladistic characters...
  29. ncbi request reprint Morphology of the enamel-dentine junction in sections of anthropoid primate maxillary molars
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 53:292-301. 2007
    ..When considered in conjunction with aspects of molar morphology, such as developmental features and enamel thickness, EDJ shape may be a useful tool for the taxonomic assessment of fossil molars...
  30. ncbi request reprint Early hominid dental remains from Members 4 and 5 of the Sterkfontein Formation (1966-1996 excavations): catalogue, individual associations, morphological descriptions and initial metrical analysis
    Jacopo Moggi-Cecchi
    Laboratori di Antropologia, Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e Genetica, Università di Firenze via del Proconsolo, 12, 50122 Firenze, Italy
    J Hum Evol 50:239-328. 2006
    ..boisei; it shows overall similar levels of variability to A. afarensis and higher levels than A. robustus. These results, per se, do not provide evidence of the existence of multiple species in the Sterkfontein Member 4 sample...
  31. pmc Dental microwear and diet of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei
    Peter S Ungar
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2044. 2008
    ..The apparent discrepancy between microwear and functional anatomy is consistent with the idea that P. boisei presents a hominin example of Liem's Paradox, wherein a highly derived morphology need not reflect a specialized diet...
  32. ncbi request reprint Robusticity and sexual dimorphism in the postcranium of modern hunter-gatherers from Australia
    Kristian J Carlson
    Department of Anatomy, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY 11568 8000, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 134:9-23. 2007
    ..Thus, elevated postcranial robusticity and sexually dimorphic mobility do not always characterize hunter-gatherers...