Natalie M Zahr

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Signs of preclinical Wernicke's encephalopathy and thiamine levels as predictors of neuropsychological deficits in alcoholism without Korsakoff's syndrome
    Anne Lise Pitel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 36:580-8. 2011
  2. pmc A mechanism of rapidly reversible cerebral ventricular enlargement independent of tissue atrophy
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 38:1121-9. 2013
  3. pmc Rat strain differences in brain structure and neurochemistry in response to binge alcohol
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 231:429-45. 2014
  4. pmc Ethanol-induced changes in the expression of proteins related to neurotransmission and metabolism in different regions of the rat brain
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 99:428-36. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Measurement of serum, liver, and brain cytokine induction, thiamine levels, and hepatopathology in rats exposed to a 4-day alcohol binge protocol
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 34:1858-70. 2010
  6. pmc Brain injury and recovery following binge ethanol: evidence from in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 67:846-54. 2010
  7. pmc In vivo evidence for alcohol-induced neurochemical changes in rat brain without protracted withdrawal, pronounced thiamine deficiency, or severe liver damage
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 34:1427-42. 2009
  8. pmc Quantification of glutamate and glutamine using constant-time point-resolved spectroscopy at 3 T
    Meng Gu
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    NMR Biomed 26:164-72. 2013
  9. pmc In vivo glutamate measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy: behavioral correlates in aging
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 34:1265-76. 2013
  10. pmc In vivo glutamate decline associated with kainic acid-induced status epilepticus
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Res 1300:65-78. 2009

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Signs of preclinical Wernicke's encephalopathy and thiamine levels as predictors of neuropsychological deficits in alcoholism without Korsakoff's syndrome
    Anne Lise Pitel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 36:580-8. 2011
    ..The graded effects in neuropsychological performance suggest that the presence of signs of WE explains, at least partially, the heterogeneity of alcoholism-related cognitive and motor deficits...
  2. pmc A mechanism of rapidly reversible cerebral ventricular enlargement independent of tissue atrophy
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 38:1121-9. 2013
    ..Together, these data support a model of fluid redistribution during acute EtOH intoxication and recovery to account for rapid ventricular volume changes...
  3. pmc Rat strain differences in brain structure and neurochemistry in response to binge alcohol
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 231:429-45. 2014
    ..g., N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline-containing compounds (Cho))...
  4. pmc Ethanol-induced changes in the expression of proteins related to neurotransmission and metabolism in different regions of the rat brain
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 99:428-36. 2011
    ..Considered collectively, all but 4 of the 39 proteins identified in the present study have been previously identified in ethanol gene- and/or protein-expression studies lending support for their role in ethanol-related brain alterations...
  5. doi request reprint Measurement of serum, liver, and brain cytokine induction, thiamine levels, and hepatopathology in rats exposed to a 4-day alcohol binge protocol
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 34:1858-70. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc Brain injury and recovery following binge ethanol: evidence from in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 67:846-54. 2010
    ..The current in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy study was conducted to test the hypothesis that binge EtOH exposure would injure but not cause the death of neurons as previously ascertained postmortem...
  7. pmc In vivo evidence for alcohol-induced neurochemical changes in rat brain without protracted withdrawal, pronounced thiamine deficiency, or severe liver damage
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 34:1427-42. 2009
    ..Thus, we provide novel in vivo evidence for alcohol exposure as causing changes in brain chemistry in the absence of protracted withdrawal, pronounced thiamine deficiency, or severe liver damage...
  8. pmc Quantification of glutamate and glutamine using constant-time point-resolved spectroscopy at 3 T
    Meng Gu
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    NMR Biomed 26:164-72. 2013
    ....
  9. pmc In vivo glutamate measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy: behavioral correlates in aging
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 34:1265-76. 2013
    ..These findings suggest that low brain glutamate levels are related to high blood pressure and that changes in brain glutamate levels might mediate the behavioral changes noted in normal aging...
  10. pmc In vivo glutamate decline associated with kainic acid-induced status epilepticus
    Natalie M Zahr
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Res 1300:65-78. 2009
    ..Taken together, these results support the conclusion that seizure activity following KA infusion causes loss of glutamatergic neurons...
  11. pmc Fiber tracking functionally distinct components of the internal capsule
    Edith V Sullivan
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:4155-63. 2010
    ....
  12. pmc Low striatal glutamate levels underlie cognitive decline in the elderly: evidence from in vivo molecular spectroscopy
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Cereb Cortex 18:2241-50. 2008
    ..The selective relations between performance and striatal Glu provide initial and novel, human in vivo support for age-related modification of Glu levels as contributing to cognitive decline in normal aging...
  13. pmc Accelerated aging of selective brain structures in human immunodeficiency virus infection: a controlled, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study
    Adolf Pfefferbaum
    Biosciences Division, Neuroscience Program, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 35:1755-68. 2014
    ....
  14. pmc In vivo metabolite differences between the basal ganglia and cerebellum of the rat brain detected with proton MRS at 3T
    Dirk Mayer
    Radiology Department Lucas MRS I Center Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, P 273, Stanford, California 94305 5488, USA
    Psychiatry Res 154:267-73. 2007
    ....
  15. pmc Problem solving, working memory, and motor correlates of association and commissural fiber bundles in normal aging: a quantitative fiber tracking study
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5723, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1050-62. 2009
    ....
  16. pmc Contributions of studies on alcohol use disorders to understanding cerebellar function
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuropsychol Rev 20:280-9. 2010
    ....
  17. pmc In vivo fiber tracking in the rat brain on a clinical 3T MRI system using a high strength insert gradient coil
    Dirk Mayer
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 35:1077-85. 2007
    ..An additional benefit of scanning at lower field strength, such as 3 T, is the reduction of artifacts due to main field inhomogeneity relative to higher field animal systems...
  18. doi request reprint Clinical and pathological features of alcohol-related brain damage
    Natalie M Zahr
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Neurol 7:284-94. 2011
    ..An awareness of the consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on human behavior and brain structure can enable clinicians to improve detection and treatment of ARBD...
  19. ncbi request reprint Graphs of brain networks
    Natalie M Zahr
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 37:1813-5. 2013
    ..This commentary discusses the study by Telesford and colleagues in which they use network science to analyze resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data collected in nonhuman primates...
  20. pmc Neuroinflammation as a neurotoxic mechanism in alcoholism: commentary on "Increased MCP-1 and microglia in various regions of human alcoholic brain"
    Edith V Sullivan
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Exp Neurol 213:10-7. 2008
  21. pmc Translational studies of alcoholism: bridging the gap
    Natalie M Zahr
    Natalie M Zahr, Ph D, is a postdoctoral fellow at SRI International, Menlo Park, California, and a research scientist with professor Edith V Sullivan, Ph D, who is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
    Alcohol Res Health 31:215-30. 2008
    ....