Wei Xu

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A neural circuit for memory specificity and generalization
    Wei Xu
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 5453, USA
    Science 339:1290-5. 2013
  2. pmc Synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-7 trigger synchronous and asynchronous phases of neurotransmitter release
    Taulant Bacaj
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 80:947-59. 2013
  3. pmc Rapid single-step induction of functional neurons from human pluripotent stem cells
    Yingsha Zhang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 78:785-98. 2013
  4. pmc Distinct neuronal coding schemes in memory revealed by selective erasure of fast synchronous synaptic transmission
    Wei Xu
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 73:990-1001. 2012
  5. pmc Doc2 supports spontaneous synaptic transmission by a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism
    Zhiping P Pang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5453, USA
    Neuron 70:244-51. 2011
  6. pmc Candidate autism gene screen identifies critical role for cell-adhesion molecule CASPR2 in dendritic arborization and spine development
    Garret R Anderson
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Nancy Pritzker Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:18120-5. 2012
  7. pmc Calmodulin suppresses synaptotagmin-2 transcription in cortical neurons
    Zhiping P Pang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304 5543, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:33930-9. 2010
  8. pmc RIM proteins activate vesicle priming by reversing autoinhibitory homodimerization of Munc13
    Lunbin Deng
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Lorry Lokey Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5453, USA
    Neuron 69:317-31. 2011
  9. pmc CSPα knockout causes neurodegeneration by impairing SNAP-25 function
    Manu Sharma
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    EMBO J 31:829-41. 2012
  10. pmc Complexin clamps asynchronous release by blocking a secondary Ca(2+) sensor via its accessory α helix
    Xiaofei Yang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 1050 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304 5543, USA
    Neuron 68:907-20. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. pmc A neural circuit for memory specificity and generalization
    Wei Xu
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 5453, USA
    Science 339:1290-5. 2013
    ..We propose that the NR determines the specificity and generalization of memory attributes for a particular context by processing information from the medial prefrontal cortex en route to the hippocampus...
  2. pmc Synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-7 trigger synchronous and asynchronous phases of neurotransmitter release
    Taulant Bacaj
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 80:947-59. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc Rapid single-step induction of functional neurons from human pluripotent stem cells
    Yingsha Zhang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 78:785-98. 2013
    ..As illustrated by selected examples, our approach enables large-scale studies of human neurons for questions such as analyses of human diseases, examination of human-specific genes, and drug screening...
  4. pmc Distinct neuronal coding schemes in memory revealed by selective erasure of fast synchronous synaptic transmission
    Wei Xu
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 73:990-1001. 2012
    ..These results indicate that different brain circuits and types of memory employ distinct spike-coding schemes to encode and transmit information...
  5. pmc Doc2 supports spontaneous synaptic transmission by a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism
    Zhiping P Pang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5453, USA
    Neuron 70:244-51. 2011
    ..Thus, our data suggest that Doc2s are modulators of spontaneous synaptic transmission that act by a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism...
  6. pmc Candidate autism gene screen identifies critical role for cell-adhesion molecule CASPR2 in dendritic arborization and spine development
    Garret R Anderson
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Nancy Pritzker Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:18120-5. 2012
    ....
  7. pmc Calmodulin suppresses synaptotagmin-2 transcription in cortical neurons
    Zhiping P Pang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304 5543, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:33930-9. 2010
    ..Our data describe a previously unknown, Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent regulatory pathway that controls the expression of synaptic proteins in the rostral-caudal neuraxis...
  8. pmc RIM proteins activate vesicle priming by reversing autoinhibitory homodimerization of Munc13
    Lunbin Deng
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Lorry Lokey Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5453, USA
    Neuron 69:317-31. 2011
    ..Both mutant and wild-type Munc13, however, rescued priming in Munc13-deficient synapses. Thus, homodimerization of Munc13 inhibits its priming function, and RIMs activate priming by disrupting Munc13 homodimerization...
  9. pmc CSPα knockout causes neurodegeneration by impairing SNAP-25 function
    Manu Sharma
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    EMBO J 31:829-41. 2012
    ..Our findings suggest that the neurodegeneration in CSPα KO mice is primarily produced by defective SNAP-25 function, which causes neurodegeneration by impairing SNARE-complex assembly...
  10. pmc Complexin clamps asynchronous release by blocking a secondary Ca(2+) sensor via its accessory α helix
    Xiaofei Yang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 1050 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304 5543, USA
    Neuron 68:907-20. 2010
    ..Thus, complexin performs mechanistically distinct activation and clamping functions that operate in conjunction with synaptotagmin-1 by controlling trans-SNARE-complex assembly...
  11. doi request reprint Calmodulin controls synaptic strength via presynaptic activation of calmodulin kinase II
    Zhiping P Pang
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304 5543, USA
    J Neurosci 30:4132-42. 2010
    ..Viewed together, these data suggest that calmodulin performs a major function in boosting synaptic strength via direct activation of presynaptic calmodulin-dependent kinase II...