Joseph Wu

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Proteomic analysis of reporter genes for molecular imaging of transplanted embryonic stem cells
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proteomics 6:6234-49. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Cardiovascular molecular imaging
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Dr, Edwards Bldg R354, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Radiology 244:337-55. 2007
  3. pmc Comparison of different adult stem cell types for treatment of myocardial ischemia
    Koen E A van der Bogt
    Laboratory of Cardiothoracic Transplantation, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Circulation 118:S121-9. 2008
  4. pmc Transcriptome alteration in the diabetic heart by rosiglitazone: implications for cardiovascular mortality
    Kitchener D Wilson
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2609. 2008
  5. pmc Functional and transcriptional characterization of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells for treatment of myocardial infarction
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e8443. 2009
  6. pmc Transcriptional and functional profiling of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes
    Feng Cao
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e3474. 2008
  7. pmc Molecular imaging of stem cells: tracking survival, biodistribution, tumorigenicity, and immunogenicity
    Eugene Gu
    1 Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
    Theranostics 2:335-45. 2012
  8. pmc nAChRs mediate human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells: proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis
    Jin Yu
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi an, People s Republic of China
    PLoS ONE 4:e7040. 2009
  9. pmc Tumorigenicity as a clinical hurdle for pluripotent stem cell therapies
    Andrew S Lee
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 19:998-1004. 2013
  10. pmc Drug screening using a library of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes reveals disease-specific patterns of cardiotoxicity
    Ping Liang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Lorry I Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5111
    Circulation 127:1677-91. 2013

Detail Information

Publications95

  1. pmc Proteomic analysis of reporter genes for molecular imaging of transplanted embryonic stem cells
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proteomics 6:6234-49. 2006
    ..In summary, this is the first proteomic study, demonstrating the unique potential of reporter gene imaging for tracking ES cell transplantation non-invasively, repetitively, and quantitatively...
  2. ncbi request reprint Cardiovascular molecular imaging
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Dr, Edwards Bldg R354, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Radiology 244:337-55. 2007
    ..Traditional methods of evaluation for these diseases will be presented first, followed by methods that incorporate conventional and molecular imaging approaches...
  3. pmc Comparison of different adult stem cell types for treatment of myocardial ischemia
    Koen E A van der Bogt
    Laboratory of Cardiothoracic Transplantation, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Circulation 118:S121-9. 2008
    ..This study is designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of 4 cell types in a murine model of myocardial infarction...
  4. pmc Transcriptome alteration in the diabetic heart by rosiglitazone: implications for cardiovascular mortality
    Kitchener D Wilson
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2609. 2008
    ..To investigate the effects of rosiglitazone on the diabetic heart, we performed cardiac transcriptional profiling and imaging studies of a murine model of type 2 diabetes, the C57BL/KLS-lepr(db)/lepr(db) (db/db) mouse...
  5. pmc Functional and transcriptional characterization of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells for treatment of myocardial infarction
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e8443. 2009
    ..Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time...
  6. pmc Transcriptional and functional profiling of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes
    Feng Cao
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e3474. 2008
    ....
  7. pmc Molecular imaging of stem cells: tracking survival, biodistribution, tumorigenicity, and immunogenicity
    Eugene Gu
    1 Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
    Theranostics 2:335-45. 2012
    ..This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity...
  8. pmc nAChRs mediate human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells: proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis
    Jin Yu
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi an, People s Republic of China
    PLoS ONE 4:e7040. 2009
    ..We tested the effect of nicotine (a key component of cigarette smoking) on the therapeutic effects of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-ECs)...
  9. pmc Tumorigenicity as a clinical hurdle for pluripotent stem cell therapies
    Andrew S Lee
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 19:998-1004. 2013
    ..In this Perspective, we present an overview of the mechanisms underlying the tumorigenic risk of human PSC-based therapies and discuss current advances in addressing these challenges. ..
  10. pmc Drug screening using a library of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes reveals disease-specific patterns of cardiotoxicity
    Ping Liang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Lorry I Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5111
    Circulation 127:1677-91. 2013
    ....
  11. pmc Immunogenicity of pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives
    Patricia E de Almeida
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5454, USA
    Circ Res 112:549-61. 2013
    ..This approach to overcome immunologic barriers to stem cell therapy can take advantage of the validated knowledge acquired from decades of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation...
  12. pmc Genome editing of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells with zinc finger nucleases for cellular imaging
    Yongming Wang
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Circ Res 111:1494-503. 2012
    ..However, the integration of reporter genes has typically relied on random integration, a method that is associated with unwanted insertional mutagenesis and positional effects on transgene expression...
  13. pmc Safe genetic modification of cardiac stem cells using a site-specific integration technique
    Feng Lan
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Circulation 126:S20-8. 2012
    ....
  14. pmc Microfluidic single-cell analysis shows that porcine induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells improve myocardial function by paracrine activation
    Mingxia Gu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circ Res 111:882-93. 2012
    ..However, clinical translation will require preclinical optimization and validation of large-animal iPSC models...
  15. pmc Imaging stem cell therapy for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease
    Julia D Ransohoff
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Curr Vasc Pharmacol 10:361-73. 2012
    ..We also review four major imaging modalities and underscore the importance of in vivo analysis of cell fate for a full understanding of functional outcomes...
  16. pmc Comparison of gene-transfer efficiency in human embryonic stem cells
    Feng Cao
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building R354, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 12:15-24. 2010
    ..The double-fusion construct provides an attractive approach for generating stable hES cell lines and monitoring engraftment and proliferation in vitro and in vivo...
  17. pmc Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells
    Shuan Lin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Biotechnol 7:67. 2007
    ..In this report, we aimed to evaluate in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells labeled with Qtracker delivered quantum dots (QDs)...
  18. ncbi request reprint An unusual cause of stroke from a left atrial mass
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Am Soc Echocardiogr 20:537.e1-2. 2007
    ..Subsequent angiogram showed a possible mycotic aneurysm of distal parietal occipital branch of the posterior cerebral artery. Cardiology was consulted to evaluate for a cardioembolic source...
  19. pmc Current perspectives on imaging cardiac stem cell therapy
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine Cardiology and Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 51:128S-136S. 2010
    ....
  20. pmc Advances in cardiovascular molecular imaging for tracking stem cell therapy
    Katherine J Ransohoff
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Thromb Haemost 104:13-22. 2010
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building, Room R354, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 32:S346-57. 2005
    ....
  22. pmc In vivo functional and transcriptional profiling of bone marrow stem cells after transplantation into ischemic myocardium
    Ahmad Y Sheikh
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 32:92-102. 2012
    ..In the present study, we evaluated the survival kinetics, transcriptional response, and functional outcome of intramyocardial bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) transplantation for cardiac repair in a murine myocardial infarction model...
  23. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of cardiovascular gene products
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5324, USA
    J Nucl Cardiol 11:491-505. 2004
  24. ncbi request reprint Transcriptional profiling of reporter genes used for molecular imaging of embryonic stem cell transplantation
    Joseph C Wu
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, USA
    Physiol Genomics 25:29-38. 2006
    ..Taken together, this is the first study to analyze in detail the effects of reporter genes on molecular imaging of ES cells...
  25. ncbi request reprint Clinical hurdles for the transplantation of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells: role of molecular imaging
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:38-45. 2007
    ..Therefore, molecular imaging is expected to play an increasing role in characterizing the biology and physiology of hESC-derived cardiac cells in living subjects...
  26. pmc In vivo imaging of embryonic stem cells reveals patterns of survival and immune rejection following transplantation
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 17:1023-9. 2008
    ..These data show that mESCs do not retain immune-privileged properties in vivo and are subject to immunological rejection as assessed by novel molecular imaging approaches...
  27. pmc Long term non-invasive imaging of embryonic stem cells using reporter genes
    Ning Sun
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Nat Protoc 4:1192-201. 2009
    ....
  28. doi request reprint Comparison of optical bioluminescence reporter gene and superparamagnetic iron oxide MR contrast agent as cell markers for noninvasive imaging of cardiac cell transplantation
    Ian Y Chen
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 11:178-87. 2009
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of myoblast-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha gene transfer
    Olivier Gheysens
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 13:1124-32. 2011
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint In vivo visualization of embryonic stem cell survival, proliferation, and migration after cardiac delivery
    Feng Cao
    Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Circulation 113:1005-14. 2006
    ..Recent studies have shown that stem cell therapy can promote tissue regeneration; however, monitoring stem cells in vivo remains problematic owing to limitations of conventional histological assays and imaging modalities...
  31. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of embryonic stem cell misbehavior and suicide gene ablation
    Feng Cao
    The Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Cloning Stem Cells 9:107-17. 2007
    ....
  32. pmc Timing of bone marrow cell delivery has minimal effects on cell viability and cardiac recovery after myocardial infarction
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 3:77-85. 2010
    ..We compared the viability and effects of transplanted BMCs on cardiac function in the acute and subacute inflammatory phases of myocardial infarction...
  33. ncbi request reprint Imaging chemically modified adenovirus for targeting tumors expressing integrin alphavbeta3 in living mice with mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase PET reporter gene
    Zhengming Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:130-9. 2006
    ....
  34. pmc Imaging survival and function of transplanted cardiac resident stem cells
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Am Coll Cardiol 53:1229-40. 2009
    ..The goal of this study is to characterize resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) and investigate their therapeutic efficacy in myocardial infarction by molecular imaging methods...
  35. pmc Molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cell grafts in ischemic rat brain
    Marcel M Daadi
    Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford Stroke Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5487, USA
    Mol Ther 17:1282-91. 2009
    ..Our data suggest that the combination of BLI and MRI modalities provides reliable real-time monitoring of cell fate...
  36. ncbi request reprint Seeing is believing: tracking cells to determine the effects of cell transplantation
    Jeremy Pearl
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 20:102-9. 2008
    ..This review describes the benefits and limitations of each technique and provides a summary of critical issues regarding stem cell transplantation that have been addressed by each imaging modality...
  37. doi request reprint Cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells with point-source electrical stimulation
    Michael Q Chen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2008:1729-32. 2008
    ..The use of this technique might have larger applications in understanding molecular pathways towards the regeneration process...
  38. pmc Effects of epigenetic modulation on reporter gene expression: implications for stem cell imaging
    Manickam Krishnan
    The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, The Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    FASEB J 20:106-8. 2006
    ..Cells treated with 5-azacytidine were monitored for 2 wk compared with 1 wk for untreated cells (P<0.05). These findings should have important implications for reporter gene-based imaging of stem cell transplantation...
  39. pmc MicroRNA-210 as a novel therapy for treatment of ischemic heart disease
    Shijun Hu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5111, USA
    Circulation 122:S124-31. 2010
    ..We hypothesize that microRNA-210 can rescue cardiac function after myocardial infarction by upregulation of angiogenesis and inhibition of cellular apoptosis in the heart...
  40. pmc Persistent donor cell gene expression among human induced pluripotent stem cells contributes to differences with human embryonic stem cells
    Zhumur Ghosh
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e8975. 2010
    ..Specifically, our analysis reveals that fetal fibroblast-derived hiPSCs are closer to hESCs, followed by adipose, neonatal fibroblast, and keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs...
  41. pmc Molecular imaging of bone marrow mononuclear cell homing and engraftment in ischemic myocardium
    Ahmad Y Sheikh
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building R354, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Stem Cells 25:2677-84. 2007
    ..Specifically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered BMMCs preferentially home to and are retained by injured myocardium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article...
  42. ncbi request reprint Modeling conduction in host-graft interactions between stem cell grafts and cardiomyocytes
    Michael Q Chen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:6014-7. 2009
    ....
  43. doi request reprint Human neural stem cell grafts modify microglial response and enhance axonal sprouting in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury
    Marcel M Daadi
    Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford Stroke Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5487, USA
    Stroke 41:516-23. 2010
    ..In the present study, we sought to investigate the efficacy of human neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in a rat model of neonatal HI and the mechanisms enhancing brain repair...
  44. ncbi request reprint Magnetic resonance imaging of progressive cardiomyopathic changes in the db/db mouse
    Patrick Yue
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5406, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 292:H2106-18. 2007
    ..In summary, as assessed by CMR, db/db mice develop characteristic structural and functional changes consistent with cardiomyopathy...
  45. pmc MicroRNA profiling of human-induced pluripotent stem cells
    Kitchener D Wilson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 18:749-58. 2009
    ....
  46. pmc Embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells engraft into the ischemic hindlimb and restore perfusion
    Ngan F Huang
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5406, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 30:984-91. 2010
    ..We examined the effect of delivery modality on the survival, localization, and functional effects of exogenously administered embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or endothelial cells derived from them (ESC-ECs) in the ischemic hindlimb...
  47. ncbi request reprint Trafficking mesenchymal stem cell engraftment and differentiation in tumor-bearing mice by bioluminescence imaging
    Hui Wang
    Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Stem Cells 27:1548-58. 2009
    ..The MSCs-R migrated to lung tumor differentiated into osteoblasts, whereas the MSCs-R targeting subcutaneous tumor differentiated into adipocytes...
  48. ncbi request reprint Optical imaging of cardiac reporter gene expression in living rats
    Joseph C Wu
    Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif, USA
    Circulation 105:1631-4. 2002
    ..Noninvasive imaging of the temporal and spatial characteristics of cardiac gene expression in the same subject offers significant advantages...
  49. pmc Immunosuppressive therapy mitigates immunological rejection of human embryonic stem cell xenografts
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:12991-6. 2008
    ..This process can be mitigated by a combined immunosuppressive regimen as assessed by molecular imaging approaches...
  50. pmc Genetic modification of embryonic stem cells with VEGF enhances cell survival and improves cardiac function
    Xiaoyan Xie
    The Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cloning Stem Cells 9:549-63. 2007
    ..With further validation, this platform may have broad applications for current basic research and further clinical studies...
  51. ncbi request reprint Integration of genomics, proteomics, and imaging for cardiac stem cell therapy
    Hyung J Chun
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 34:S20-6. 2007
    ..In this paper, we review three methods - molecular cellular imaging, gene expression profiling, and proteomic analysis - that can be integrated to provide further insights into the role of this emerging therapy...
  52. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells: keeping an eye on differentiation, tumorigenicity and immunogenicity
    Koen E A van der Bogt
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Cell Cycle 5:2748-52. 2006
    ..Here, we provide an outline of the current status of hESC research and discuss the concerns of tumorigenicity and immunogenicity. Furthermore, we describe how molecular imaging can be utilized to follow and resolve these issues...
  53. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of cardiac stem cell transplantation
    Ahmad Y Sheikh
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology and Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building, Room R 354, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Curr Cardiol Rep 8:147-54. 2006
    ..This article provides a focused overview of clinical stem cell therapy for the heart, followed by a discussion of how novel molecular imaging techniques are presently being applied to monitor cell therapy...
  54. pmc Imaging of STAT3 signaling pathway during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation
    Xiaoyan Xie
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 18:205-14. 2009
    ..This genetically modified line can be used to study the biological role of STAT3 during ES cell differentiation into different derivatives...
  55. ncbi request reprint Overview of stem cells and imaging modalities for cardiovascular diseases
    Gwendolen Y Chang
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    J Nucl Cardiol 13:554-69. 2006
    ..This review offers a focused discussion on the use of stem cell therapy and imaging in the context of cardiology...
  56. pmc Comparison of imaging techniques for tracking cardiac stem cell therapy
    Sarah J Zhang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1916-9. 2007
  57. pmc Studies in adipose-derived stromal cells: migration and participation in repair of cranial injury after systemic injection
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:1130-40. 2011
    ..The authors sought to examine whether systemically administered adipose-derived stromal cells would migrate to and heal surgically created defects of the mouse cranial skeleton...
  58. ncbi request reprint Spatial and temporal kinetics of teratoma formation from murine embryonic stem cell transplantation
    Feng Cao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 16:883-91. 2007
    ..Collectively, these results illustrate the potent tumorigenic potential of ES cells, which presents an enormous obstacle for future clinical studies...
  59. doi request reprint Bioluminescence reporter gene imaging of human embryonic stem cell survival, proliferation, and fate
    Kitchener D Wilson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 574:87-103. 2009
    ..In this chapter, the specific materials and methods needed for tracking stem cell proliferation with bioluminescence imaging will be described...
  60. pmc Poor functional recovery after transplantation of diabetic bone marrow stem cells in ischemic myocardium
    Johannes A Govaert
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Heart Lung Transplant 28:1158-1165.e1. 2009
    ..Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) therapy has shown promise for improving cardiac function after myocardial infarction. The efficiency of such therapy for diabetic patients remains unknown...
  61. pmc Comparison of reporter gene and iron particle labeling for tracking fate of human embryonic stem cells and differentiated endothelial cells in living subjects
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Stem Cells 26:864-73. 2008
    ..Furthermore, transplantation of predifferentiated rather than undifferentiated hES cells would be more suited for avoiding teratoma formation...
  62. pmc Differentiation, survival, and function of embryonic stem cell derived endothelial cells for ischemic heart disease
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circulation 116:I46-54. 2007
    ....
  63. pmc Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 252:117-27. 2009
    ..To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning...
  64. doi request reprint Intracellular and extracellular targets of molecular imaging in the myocardium
    Hyung J Chun
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Cardiovasc Med 5:S33-41. 2008
    ..Further development of these imaging targets may lead to improved characterization of disease processes and guide provision of individualized therapies...
  65. pmc Short hairpin RNA interference therapy for ischemic heart disease
    Mei Huang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building R354, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Circulation 118:S226-33. 2008
    ..Here we hypothesize that short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference therapy targeting PHD2 can be used for treatment of myocardial ischemia and this process can be followed noninvasively by molecular imaging...
  66. doi request reprint Noninvasive radionuclide imaging of cardiac gene therapy: progress and potential
    Asimina Hiona
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Cardiovasc Med 5:S87-95. 2008
    ..We discuss limitations of current methods for analyzing gene transfer and describe how reporter gene imaging works...
  67. pmc Positron emission tomography imaging of conditional gene activation in the heart
    Gwendolen Y Chang
    The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    J Mol Cell Cardiol 43:18-26. 2007
    ..With further development and validation, PET imaging will likely play an important role in the noninvasive, repetitive, and quantitative measurement of conditional gene activation in the future...
  68. pmc Effects of ionizing radiation on self-renewal and pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells
    Kitchener D Wilson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 70:5539-48. 2010
    ..Studies such as this will help define the limits for radiation exposure for pregnant women and also radiotracer reporter probes for tracking cellular regenerative therapies...
  69. ncbi request reprint Multimodal evaluation of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial restoration by mouse embryonic stem cells
    Stephen L Hendry
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 136:1028-1037.e1. 2008
    ..Multimodal comparison of the restorative effects of mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts was performed to validate magnetic resonance imaging data and provide mechanistic insight...
  70. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells
    Kazim H Narsinh
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 515:13-32. 2009
    ....
  71. pmc Imaging of VEGF receptor in a rat myocardial infarction model using PET
    Martin Rodriguez-Porcel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:667-73. 2008
    ..We have developed a PET tracer (64Cu-DOTA-VEGF121 [DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid]) to image VEGF receptor (VEGFR) expression after MI in the living subject...
  72. pmc Comparison of transplantation of adipose tissue- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the infarcted heart
    Koen E A van der Bogt
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Transplantation 87:642-52. 2009
    ..However, the in vivo fate and function of adipose stromal cells (ASC) in the infarcted heart has never been compared directly to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (MSC)...
  73. pmc Effects of cell number on teratoma formation by human embryonic stem cells
    Andrew S Lee
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Cell Cycle 8:2608-12. 2009
    ..Engraftment and tumor occurrence were also observed to be highly dependent on ES cell number. We anticipate these results should yield useful insights to the safe and reliable application of human ES cell derivatives in the clinic...
  74. pmc In vivo imaging and evaluation of different biomatrices for improvement of stem cell survival
    Feng Cao
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Tissue Eng Regen Med 1:465-8. 2007
    ..The longitudinal fate of transplanted stem cells was monitored by reporter imaging techniques...
  75. pmc Imaging: guiding the clinical translation of cardiac stem cell therapy
    Patricia K Nguyen
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circ Res 109:962-79. 2011
    ..Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials...
  76. pmc Double knockdown of prolyl hydroxylase and factor-inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor with nonviral minicircle gene therapy enhances stem cell mobilization and angiogenesis after myocardial infarction
    Mei Huang
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5454, USA
    Circulation 124:S46-54. 2011
    ..Because HIF-1α mediates the cardioprotective response to ischemic injury, its upregulation may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic heart failure...
  77. pmc In vivo bioluminescence for tracking cell fate and function
    Patricia E de Almeida
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5454, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 301:H663-71. 2011
    ..Overall, this technology not only enables rapid, reproducible, and quantitative monitoring of physiological processes in vivo but also can measure the influences of therapeutic interventions on the outcome of cardiac injuries...
  78. pmc Novel microRNA prosurvival cocktail for improving engraftment and function of cardiac progenitor cell transplantation
    Shijun Hu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5454, USA
    Circulation 124:S27-34. 2011
    ..Therefore, the development of novel prosurvival strategies to boost stem cell survival will be of significant benefit to this field...
  79. pmc Derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiovascular disease modeling
    Kamileh Narsinh
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Circ Res 108:1146-56. 2011
    ..We review these various methods for the derivation of hiPSCs, focusing on their ultimate clinical applicability, with an emphasis on their potential for use as cardiovascular therapies and disease-modeling platforms...
  80. pmc Novel minicircle vector for gene therapy in murine myocardial infarction
    Mei Huang
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Circulation 120:S230-7. 2009
    ..In this study, we develop a novel nonviral vector that robustly and persistently expresses the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) therapeutic gene in the heart, leading to functional benefits after myocardial infarction...
  81. doi request reprint Hepatocyte growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer maximizes mesenchymal stem cell-based myocardial salvage after acute myocardial infarction
    Tobias Deuse
    Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University, CA 94305 5407, USA
    Circulation 120:S247-54. 2009
    ..Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based regenerative strategies were investigated to treat acute myocardial infarction and improve left ventricular function...
  82. ncbi request reprint Micro-positron emission tomography imaging of cardiac gene expression in rats using bicistronic adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery
    Ian Y Chen
    Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif 94305 5427, USA
    Circulation 109:1415-20. 2004
    ....
  83. pmc Reporter gene imaging following percutaneous delivery in swine moving toward clinical applications
    Martin Rodriguez-Porcel
    J Am Coll Cardiol 51:595-7. 2008
  84. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of cardiac cell transplantation in living animals using optical bioluminescence and positron emission tomography
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology and Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif, USA
    Circulation 108:1302-5. 2003
    ..The current method of analyzing myocardial cell transplantation relies on postmortem histology. We sought to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring transplanted cell survival in living animals using molecular imaging techniques...
  85. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of the kinetics of vascular endothelial growth factor gene expression in ischemic myocardium
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, the Crump Institute of Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif, USA
    Circulation 110:685-91. 2004
    ..In this study, we used micro-positron emission tomography (microPET) to monitor the transgene expression, function, and effects in a whole-body system...
  86. ncbi request reprint Positron-emission tomography reporter gene expression imaging in rat myocardium
    Masayuki Inubushi
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, Los Angeles 90095 1735, USA
    Circulation 107:326-32. 2003
    ....
  87. ncbi request reprint Positron emission tomography imaging of cardiac reporter gene expression in living rats
    Joseph C Wu
    Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif 90095 1770, USA
    Circulation 106:180-3. 2002
    ..Imaging reporter gene expression is useful for noninvasive monitoring of gene therapy. In this study, we imaged cardiac reporter gene expression in living rats using micro positron emission tomography (microPET)...
  88. ncbi request reprint In vivo bioluminescence imaging of cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into rat myocardium
    Jung Joon Min
    Institute for Molecular Photonic Imaging Research, Chonnam National University Hospital, Republic of Korea
    Ann Nucl Med 20:165-70. 2006
    ..Here, we have sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a longitudinal monitoring of transplanted cell survival in living animals, accomplished with optical imaging techniques and pharmacological interventions...
  89. ncbi request reprint Frontal lobe metabolic decreases with sleep deprivation not totally reversed by recovery sleep
    Joseph C Wu
    UC Irvine Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Irvine, CA, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:2783-92. 2006
    ..Recovery sleep was found to have only a partial restorative effect on frontal lobe function with minimal reversal of subcortical deficits. Sleep may be especially important for maintenance of frontal lobe activity...
  90. ncbi request reprint Image-guided cardiac cell delivery using high-resolution small-animal ultrasound
    Martin Rodriguez-Porcel
    Department of Internal Medicine, Divisions of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Mol Ther 12:1142-7. 2005
    ..We are confident that the use of these technologies will play a significant role in the future of gene and cell therapy...
  91. ncbi request reprint 18F-labeled bombesin analogs for targeting GRP receptor-expressing prostate cancer
    Xianzhong Zhang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:492-501. 2006
    ..The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is found to be overexpressed in a variety of human tumors. The aim of this study was to develop 18F-labeled bombesin analogs for PET of GRPR expression in prostate cancer xenograft models...
  92. ncbi request reprint Can radionuclide imaging predict future response to stem cell therapy?
    Joseph C Wu
    J Nucl Cardiol 15:308-10. 2008
  93. ncbi request reprint Sleep deprivation PET correlations of Hamilton symptom improvement ratings with changes in relative glucose metabolism in patients with depression
    Joseph C Wu
    UC Irvine Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Irvine, California 92697 3960, United States
    J Affect Disord 107:181-6. 2008
    ..In addition, we also studied the effect of concomitant antidepressant medication in conjunction with sleep depression...
  94. ncbi request reprint Clinical dilemmas in treating left ventricular thrombus
    Nicholas J Leeper
    Int J Cardiol 114:e118-9. 2007
  95. ncbi request reprint Cardiac-specific gene expression facilitated by an enhanced myosin light chain promoter
    Wolfgang Boecker
    Klinikum Grosshadern
    Mol Imaging 3:69-75. 2004
    ..Adenoviral gene transfer has been shown to be effective in cardiac myocytes in vitro and in vivo. A major limitation of myocardial gene therapy is the extracardiac transgene expression...

Research Grants12

  1. Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation
    Joseph Wu; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The goal is to use molecular imaging to guide stem cell therapy, which should translate into transplant protocols that are more reproducible, quantifiable, and beneficial. ..
  2. Re-Education of the Immune System for hES Cell Tolerance
    Joseph C Wu; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..If successful, this achievement will represent a major scientific advancement in hES cell immunology and a significant step toward their eventual clinical translation. ..
  3. Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy
    Joseph C Wu; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Importantly, the information we obtain here on detection sensitivity and the overall experience we gain will be extremely valuable for eventual clinical translation of cardiac molecular imaging in the future. ..
  4. Molecular Imaging of Targeted Cardiac Gene Therapy
    Joseph C Wu; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  5. Integrated Strategies for Novel Treatment of Myocardial Ischemia
    Joseph C Wu; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Finally, the application of non-invasive imaging modalities in small and large animal models will help validate and translate gene therapy protocols in the clinical arena. ..
  6. Re-Education of the Immune System for hES Cell Tolerance
    Joseph Wu; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..If successful, this achievement will represent a major scientific advancement in hES cell immunology and a significant step toward their eventual clinical translation. ..
  7. Molecular Imaging of Targeted Cardiac Gene Therapy
    Joseph Wu; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  8. Nanostructuring and Molecular Imaging of Engineered Cardiovascular Tissues
    Joseph Wu; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..With a multi-disciplinary team approach, we are confident that these combined efforts will accelerate the translation of nanotechnology-based tissue engineering to the clinical arena in the future. ..
  9. Integrated Strategies for Novel Treatment of Myocardial Ischemia
    Joseph C Wu; Fiscal Year: 2011
    ..Finally, the application of non-invasive imaging modalities in small and large animal models will help validate and translate gene therapy protocols in the clinical arena. ..