M A Winkleby

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Ethnic and socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular disease risk factors: findings for women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif 94304, USA
    JAMA 280:356-62. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Ethnic variation in cardiovascular disease risk factors among children and young adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif 94304 1825, USA
    JAMA 281:1006-13. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Pathways by which SES and ethnicity influence cardiovascular disease risk factors
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94304 1825, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 896:191-209. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Neighborhood context and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the contribution of material deprivation
    C Cubbin
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Ethn Dis 11:687-700. 2001
  5. pmc Cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican American adults: a transcultural analysis of NHANES III, 1988-1994
    J Sundquist
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1825, USA
    Am J Public Health 89:723-30. 1999
  6. ncbi request reprint Identifying patients for weight-loss treatment: an empirical evaluation of the NHLBI obesity education initiative expert panel treatment recommendations
    M Kiernan
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, 730 Welch Rd, Suite B, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA
    Arch Intern Med 160:2169-76. 2000
  7. pmc Influence of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status on mortality among black, Mexican-American, and white women and men in the United States
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1825, USA
    J Epidemiol Community Health 57:444-52. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Do logistic regression and signal detection identify different subgroups at risk? Implications for the design of tailored interventions
    M Kiernan
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 730 Welch Road, Suite B, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Psychol Methods 6:35-48. 2001

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Ethnic and socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular disease risk factors: findings for women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif 94304, USA
    JAMA 280:356-62. 1998
    ..However, because ethnic minority women are disproportionately poor, socioeconomic status (SES) may substantially explain these risk factor differences...
  2. ncbi request reprint Ethnic variation in cardiovascular disease risk factors among children and young adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif 94304 1825, USA
    JAMA 281:1006-13. 1999
    ..Knowledge about ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among children and young adults from national samples is limited...
  3. ncbi request reprint Pathways by which SES and ethnicity influence cardiovascular disease risk factors
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94304 1825, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 896:191-209. 1999
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Neighborhood context and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the contribution of material deprivation
    C Cubbin
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Ethn Dis 11:687-700. 2001
    ..Policies and interventions that address the socioeconomic context in which people live might reduce inequalities in CVD risk factors...
  5. pmc Cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican American adults: a transcultural analysis of NHANES III, 1988-1994
    J Sundquist
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1825, USA
    Am J Public Health 89:723-30. 1999
    ..This study examined the extent to which cardiovascular disease risk factors differ among subgroups of Mexican Americans living in the United States...
  6. ncbi request reprint Identifying patients for weight-loss treatment: an empirical evaluation of the NHLBI obesity education initiative expert panel treatment recommendations
    M Kiernan
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, 730 Welch Rd, Suite B, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA
    Arch Intern Med 160:2169-76. 2000
    ....
  7. pmc Influence of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status on mortality among black, Mexican-American, and white women and men in the United States
    M A Winkleby
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1825, USA
    J Epidemiol Community Health 57:444-52. 2003
    ..Thirdly, they calculated the population attributable risk to estimate the reduction in mortality rates if all women and men lived in the highest SES neighbourhoods...
  8. ncbi request reprint Do logistic regression and signal detection identify different subgroups at risk? Implications for the design of tailored interventions
    M Kiernan
    Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 730 Welch Road, Suite B, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Psychol Methods 6:35-48. 2001
    ..Because of the ability to identify homogeneous subgroups, signal detection may be more useful than logistic regression for designing distinct tailored interventions for subgroups of high-risk individuals...