B A Wandell

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Biological development of reading circuits
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Electronic address
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 23:261-8. 2013
  2. pmc Visual field map clusters in human cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 360:693-707. 2005
  3. pmc Plasticity and stability of visual field maps in adult primary visual cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Stanford University, Psychology Department, Jordan Hall, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 10:873-84. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Functional imaging of the visual pathways
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neurol Clin 21:417-43, vi. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual field maps in human cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuron 56:366-83. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Colour vision: cortical circuitry for appearance
    Brian Wandell
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Curr Biol 18:R250-1. 2008
  7. pmc Imaging retinotopic maps in the human brain
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Vision Res 51:718-37. 2011
  8. pmc The neurobiological basis of seeing words
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1224:63-80. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Visualization and measurement of the cortical surface
    B A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 12:739-52. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint Color signals in human motion-selective cortex
    B A Wandell
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 24:901-9. 1999

Research Grants

  1. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2001
  2. HUMAN VISUAL PATHWAYS DEVELOPMENT AND SKILLED READING
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2005
  3. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2006
  4. Development of the Human Visual Pathways and Skilled Reading
    Brian A Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2010
  5. Development of the Human Visual Pathways and Skilled Reading
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2007
  6. Training in Cognitive Neuroscience
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2007
  7. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1993
  8. WAVELENGTH DISCRIMINATION AT MODULATION THRESHOLD
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1980
  9. WAVELENGTH DISCRIMINATION AT MODULATION THRESHOLD
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1991
  10. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian A Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2010

Detail Information

Publications49

  1. pmc Biological development of reading circuits
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Electronic address
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 23:261-8. 2013
    ..Understanding reading circuitry development may suggest ways to improve how we teach children to read...
  2. pmc Visual field map clusters in human cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 360:693-707. 2005
    ..The spatial organization of these clusters suggests that the perceptual processing within each cluster serves related functions...
  3. pmc Plasticity and stability of visual field maps in adult primary visual cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Stanford University, Psychology Department, Jordan Hall, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 10:873-84. 2009
    ..These problems limit efforts to translate research findings about adult cortical plasticity into significant clinical, educational and policy applications...
  4. ncbi request reprint Functional imaging of the visual pathways
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neurol Clin 21:417-43, vi. 2003
    ..The new fMRI focus on measurements of the human brain will drive new relationships between neurology and visual neuroscience that should help us learn much more about the neural basis of perception...
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual field maps in human cortex
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuron 56:366-83. 2007
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Colour vision: cortical circuitry for appearance
    Brian Wandell
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Curr Biol 18:R250-1. 2008
    ..Directly stimulating certain cortical neurons can produce a color sensation; a case is reported in which the color perceived by stimulation is the same as the color that most effectively excites the cortical circuitry...
  7. pmc Imaging retinotopic maps in the human brain
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Vision Res 51:718-37. 2011
    ..We do not know what such theories will look like, but the characterization of human retinotopic maps from the last 25years is likely to be an important part of future ideas about visual computations...
  8. pmc The neurobiological basis of seeing words
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1224:63-80. 2011
    ..The measurements from the two fields are in close cortical proximity, and there are good opportunities for coordinating theoretical ideas about function in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex...
  9. ncbi request reprint Visualization and measurement of the cortical surface
    B A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 12:739-52. 2000
    ..Results of applying the methods to structural magnetic resonance measurements of the human brain are also shown. The implementation details are available in the source code, which is freely available on the Internet...
  10. ncbi request reprint Color signals in human motion-selective cortex
    B A Wandell
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 24:901-9. 1999
    ..But, their responsivity is far lower than the normals' responsivity to luminance contrast. Thus, the powerful magnocellular input to MT+ is either weak or silent during photopic vision in S cone monochromats...
  11. ncbi request reprint Computational neuroimaging of human visual cortex
    B A Wandell
    Neuroscience Program, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 22:145-73. 1999
    ..By framing experiments and analyses as questions about visual computation, these neuroimaging measurements can be coupled closely with those from other basic vision-science methods...
  12. pmc Learning to see words
    Brian A Wandell
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 63:31-53. 2012
    ..Such methods have the potential to clarify why a child has difficulty learning to read and to offer guidance about the interventions that may be useful for that child...
  13. ncbi request reprint Perceived speed of colored stimuli
    R F Dougherty
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 24:893-9. 1999
    ..Perceived speed differences caused by variations in color can be explained by color responses that are characteristic of motion-selective cortex...
  14. ncbi request reprint Assessment of stimulus-induced changes in human V1 visual field maps
    Junjie V Liu
    Jordan Hall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:3398-408. 2006
    ..The measurements can be explained by small and systematic response amplitude differences that arise when probing with stimuli moving in different directions...
  15. pmc V1 projection zone signals in human macular degeneration depend on task, not stimulus
    Yoichiro Masuda
    Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cereb Cortex 18:2483-93. 2008
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Cone signal interactions in direction-selective neurons in the middle temporal visual area (MT)
    Crista L Barberini
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vis 5:603-21. 2005
    ..The sensitivity of single MT neurons and the correlation between trial-to-trial variations in single neuron firing and perception are similar for S- and L,M-cone stimuli, further supporting a role for MT in processing chromatic motion...
  17. ncbi request reprint Seeing gray through the ON and OFF pathways
    E J Chichilnisky
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Vis Neurosci 13:591-6. 1996
    ..We interpret these asymmetries as differences in mechanisms of adaptation in the ON and OFF pathways, and suggest that they evolved to accommodate the range and physical sources of color signals in the two pathways...
  18. pmc Cortical maps and white matter tracts following long period of visual deprivation and retinal image restoration
    Netta Levin
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuron 65:21-31. 2010
    ..In general, visual restoration will require accounting for the developmental trajectory of the individual and the consequences of the early deprivation on cortical circuitry...
  19. pmc Contrast responsivity in MT+ correlates with phonological awareness and reading measures in children
    Michal Ben-Shachar
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, and Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 37:1396-406. 2007
    ..These results establish an important link between visual and phonological processing in children and suggest that MT+ responsivity is a marker for healthy reading development...
  20. pmc Full-brain coverage and high-resolution imaging capabilities of passband b-SSFP fMRI at 3T
    Jin Hyung Lee
    Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Magn Reson Med 59:1099-110. 2008
    ....
  21. pmc ConTrack: finding the most likely pathways between brain regions using diffusion tractography
    Anthony J Sherbondy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vis 8:15.1-16. 2008
    ..Further we show that separating sampling and scoring enables ConTrack to identify valid pathways, known to exist, that are missed by other deterministic and probabilistic DFT algorithms...
  22. pmc Two temporal channels in human V1 identified using fMRI
    Hiroshi Horiguchi
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuroimage 47:273-80. 2009
    ..The sustained signals may reflect the emphasis on pattern recognition and color in the central visual field; the dominant transient response in the visual periphery may reflect responses in the human visual attention system...
  23. pmc Frontoparietal white matter diffusion properties predict mental arithmetic skills in children
    Jessica M Tsang
    Department of Psychology, School of Education, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:22546-51. 2009
    ..These measurements used DTI, a structural method, to test a specific functional model of mental arithmetic...
  24. pmc Think global, act local; projectome estimation with BlueMatter
    Anthony J Sherbondy
    IBM Almaden Reserach Center, Almaden, USA
    Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv 12:861-8. 2009
    ..The candidates are derived from several sources, including atlases and multiple tractography algorithms. Using BlueMatter we created the highest resolution, volume-conserved projectome of the human brain...
  25. pmc Mapping hV4 and ventral occipital cortex: the venous eclipse
    Jonathan Winawer
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vis 10:1. 2010
    ..In these subjects, the visual field coverage extends to the lower meridian, or nearly so, consistent with a model in which hV4 is located on the ventral surface and responds to signals throughout the full contralateral hemifield...
  26. pmc Identifying the human optic radiation using diffusion imaging and fiber tractography
    Anthony J Sherbondy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vis 8:12.1-11. 2008
    ..We find that the anterior tip of Meyer's loop is 28 +/- 3 mm posterior to the temporal pole, and the population range is 1 cm. Hence, it is important to identify the location of this bundle in individual subjects or patients...
  27. pmc Temporal-callosal pathway diffusivity predicts phonological skills in children
    Robert F Dougherty
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, and Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8556-61. 2007
    ..These measurements are consistent with previous work suggesting that good readers have reduced interhemispheric connectivity and are better at processing rapidly changing visual and auditory stimuli...
  28. ncbi request reprint White matter pathways in reading
    Michal Ben-Shachar
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 17:258-70. 2007
    ..We describe how the results from diffusion tensor imaging can be integrated with functional results in good and poor readers...
  29. ncbi request reprint Visual field representations and locations of visual areas V1/2/3 in human visual cortex
    Robert F Dougherty
    Department of Psychology and Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vis 3:586-98. 2003
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Chromatic light adaptation measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Alex R Wade
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 22:8148-57. 2002
    ....
  31. pmc Functional measurements of human ventral occipital cortex: retinotopy and colour
    Alex R Wade
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:963-73. 2002
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Specializations for chromatic and temporal signals in human visual cortex
    Junjie Liu
    Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 25:3459-68. 2005
    ..Similar to human color perception, VO responds powerfully to all colors but only to relatively low temporal frequencies...
  33. pmc Functional organization of human occipital-callosal fiber tracts
    Robert F Dougherty
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:7350-5. 2005
    ..We conclude that most of the estimated tracts are real and can be localized with a precision of 1-2 mm, but many tracts are missed because of data and algorithm limitations...
  34. pmc Population receptive field estimates in human visual cortex
    Serge O Dumoulin
    Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 39:647-60. 2008
    ..The pRF method is non-invasive and can be applied to a wide range of conditions when it is useful to link fMRI signals in the visual pathways to neuronal receptive fields...
  35. ncbi request reprint Visual field maps and stimulus selectivity in human ventral occipital cortex
    Alyssa A Brewer
    Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 8:1102-9. 2005
    ..The maps and stimulus responsivity support a general organization of visual cortex based on clusters of maps that serve distinct computational functions...
  36. ncbi request reprint Occipital-callosal pathways in children: Validation and atlas development
    Robert F Dougherty
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1064:98-112. 2005
    ..The properties of these fiber bundles match those of the hypothetical pathways described in the neurological literature on alexia...
  37. ncbi request reprint Reorganization of human cortical maps caused by inherited photoreceptor abnormalities
    Heidi A Baseler
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Neurosci 5:364-70. 2002
    ..The measurements trace a causal pathway that begins with a genetic anomaly that directly influences sensory cells and ultimately results in a substantial central reorganization...
  38. ncbi request reprint Long-term deprivation affects visual perception and cortex
    Ione Fine
    Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:915-6. 2003
  39. ncbi request reprint Differential sensitivity to words and shapes in ventral occipito-temporal cortex
    Michal Ben-Shachar
    Stanford Institute for Reading and Learning, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:1604-11. 2007
    ..Visual hemifield invariance was similar for words and line drawings. These results suggest that left and right pOTS are both involved in shape processing, with enhanced efficiency for processing visual word forms...
  40. ncbi request reprint Visual areas in macaque cortex measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Alyssa A Brewer
    Neuroscience Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 22:10416-26. 2002
    ..The ability to measure human and macaque maps using the same technology will make it possible to define computational homologies between the two species...
  41. pmc Bound pool fractions complement diffusion measures to describe white matter micro and macrostructure
    Nikola Stikov
    Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 54:1112-21. 2011
    ..We found that several major tracts have high BPF, suggesting a higher density of myelin in these tracts. We interpret these results in the context of a quantitative tissue model...
  42. ncbi request reprint Visual areas and spatial summation in human visual cortex
    W A Press
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Vision Res 41:1321-32. 2001
    ..Fourth, based on visual field and spatial summation measurements, it appears that the receptive field properties of neurons in area V7 differ from those in areas V3A and V3B...
  43. ncbi request reprint Trichromatic opponent color classification
    E J Chichilnisky
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Vision Res 39:3444-58. 1999
    ..The effect of background light on classification was largely explained by separate gain changes in increment and decrement cone signals...
  44. pmc Congenital achiasma and see-saw nystagmus in VACTERL syndrome
    Saurabh Prakash
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Neuroophthalmol 30:45-8. 2010
    ..Functional MRI during monocular visual stimulation demonstrated non-crossing of the visual evoked responses in the occipital cortex, confirming achiasma. These findings have not previously been reported in VACTERL...
  45. ncbi request reprint Predominantly extra-retinotopic cortical response to pattern symmetry
    Christopher W Tyler
    Smith Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Neuroimage 24:306-14. 2005
    ..The high level of activation in this region of cortex may represent part of a general class of computations that require integration of information across a large span of the visual field...
  46. ncbi request reprint Lack of long-term cortical reorganization after macaque retinal lesions
    Stelios M Smirnakis
    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstrasse 38, D 72076 Tubingen, Germany
    Nature 435:300-7. 2005
    ..Electrophysiology experiments corroborated the fMRI results. This indicates that adult macaque V1 has limited potential for reorganization in the months following retinal injury...
  47. ncbi request reprint No functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for brightness and color filling-in in early human visual cortex
    Frans W Cornelissen
    NeuroImaging Centre, School of Behavioural and Cognitive Neurosciences, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB, The Netherlands
    J Neurosci 26:3634-41. 2006
    ..We conclude that the visual field maps of human V1 and V2 do not contain filled-in, topographical representations of surface brightness and color...
  48. ncbi request reprint Interpreting the BOLD signal
    Nikos K Logothetis
    Max Planck Institut für biologische Kybernetik, Tubingen, Germany
    Annu Rev Physiol 66:735-69. 2004
    ..We conclude with a discussion of how to use the BOLD signal to make inferences about the neural signal...
  49. ncbi request reprint What's in your mind?
    Brian A Wandell
    Nat Neurosci 11:384-5. 2008

Research Grants40

  1. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The second study address the problem of why colored patterns at high temporal or spatial frequency appear achromatic. ..
  2. HUMAN VISUAL PATHWAYS DEVELOPMENT AND SKILLED READING
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Further, we expect that the failure of normal development in one or both of these regions will help to diagnose potential difficulties in reading development. ..
  3. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  4. Development of the Human Visual Pathways and Skilled Reading
    Brian A Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  5. Development of the Human Visual Pathways and Skilled Reading
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  6. Training in Cognitive Neuroscience
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  7. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..The experiments in this grant are designed to discover the logical organization of appearance judgments and to relate these judgments to neural mechanisms...
  8. WAVELENGTH DISCRIMINATION AT MODULATION THRESHOLD
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1980
    ..Assisting the successful completion of that project, I then propose to study a specific bypothesis concerning the adapting behavior of the non-opponent pathway postulated by zonal theories...
  9. WAVELENGTH DISCRIMINATION AT MODULATION THRESHOLD
    Brian Wandell; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..Maloney and Wandell (1986) suggested that color constancy can be obtained by using the spatial correlation of receptor responses...
  10. NEURAL REPRESENTATION OF COLOR APPEARANCE
    Brian A Wandell; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..These measurements help understand disease conditions in which people fail to recognize faces (prosopagnosia), see colors (achromatopsia), or no longer recognize written words (alexia). ..