Peter Vitousek

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20130119. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint Terrestrial phosphorus limitation: mechanisms, implications, and nitrogen-phosphorus interactions
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 20:5-15. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint Landscape-level variation in forest structure and biogeochemistry across a substrate age gradient in Hawaii
    Peter Vitousek
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 90:3074-86. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Nitrogen and nature
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ambio 31:97-101. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Development of a diverse epiphyte community in response to phosphorus fertilization
    Jon W Benner
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:628-36. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Stoichiometry of ferns in Hawaii: implications for nutrient cycling
    Kathryn L Amatangelo
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 157:619-27. 2008
  7. doi request reprint A unifying framework for dinitrogen fixation in the terrestrial biosphere
    Benjamin Z Houlton
    Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 454:327-30. 2008
  8. pmc Business strategies for conservation on private lands: Koa forestry as a case study
    Joshua H Goldstein
    Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 2210, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10140-5. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Erosion and landscape development affect plant nutrient status in the Hawaiian Islands
    Stephen Porder
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 142:440-9. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint Sources of nutrients to windward agricultural systems in pre-contact Hawai'i
    Molly A Palmer
    Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:1444-53. 2009

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20130119. 2013
    ..This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed...
  2. ncbi request reprint Terrestrial phosphorus limitation: mechanisms, implications, and nitrogen-phosphorus interactions
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 20:5-15. 2010
    ..Similarly, demand-independent losses and constraints to N fixation can control the ecosystem-level mass balance of N and cause it to be an ultimate limiting nutrient...
  3. ncbi request reprint Landscape-level variation in forest structure and biogeochemistry across a substrate age gradient in Hawaii
    Peter Vitousek
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 90:3074-86. 2009
    ..This increasing heterogeneity was associated with a larger patch size of canopy turnover and with dominance of most secondary successional stands by the mat-forming fern Dicranopteris linearis in the older landscapes...
  4. ncbi request reprint Nitrogen and nature
    Peter M Vitousek
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ambio 31:97-101. 2002
    ..Together these processes drive and sustain N limitation in many natural terrestrial ecosystems...
  5. ncbi request reprint Development of a diverse epiphyte community in response to phosphorus fertilization
    Jon W Benner
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:628-36. 2007
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Stoichiometry of ferns in Hawaii: implications for nutrient cycling
    Kathryn L Amatangelo
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 157:619-27. 2008
    ..These differences could contribute to the widespread abundance of polypod ferns in an angiosperm-dominated world, and to patterns of nutrient cycling and limitation in sites where ferns are abundant...
  7. doi request reprint A unifying framework for dinitrogen fixation in the terrestrial biosphere
    Benjamin Z Houlton
    Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 454:327-30. 2008
    ....
  8. pmc Business strategies for conservation on private lands: Koa forestry as a case study
    Joshua H Goldstein
    Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 2210, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10140-5. 2006
    ..Governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private investors have roles to play in catalyzing this transition by developing new revenue streams that can reach a broad spectrum of landowners...
  9. ncbi request reprint Erosion and landscape development affect plant nutrient status in the Hawaiian Islands
    Stephen Porder
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 142:440-9. 2005
    ..In addition, there can be as much biogeochemical variation on fine spatial scales in eroding landscapes as there is across millions of years of ecosystem development on stable surfaces...
  10. ncbi request reprint Sources of nutrients to windward agricultural systems in pre-contact Hawai'i
    Molly A Palmer
    Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:1444-53. 2009
    ..In effect, irrigation waters brought nutrients from rocks to the windward crops...
  11. pmc Invasive plants transform the three-dimensional structure of rain forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4519-23. 2008
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of elevated CO2, N deposition and climate change on plant litter quality in a California annual grassland
    Hugh A L Henry
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 142:465-73. 2005
    ..However, with the exception of variation in N, litter quality had little influence on decomposition over the short term...
  13. ncbi request reprint Resource-use efficiency and plant invasion in low-resource systems
    Jennifer L Funk
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Nature 446:1079-81. 2007
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Rapid nutrient cycling in leaf litter from invasive plants in Hawai'i
    Steven D Allison
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    Oecologia 141:612-9. 2004
    ..Such changes are likely to cause a positive feedback to invasion in Hawai'i because many invasive plants thrive on nutrient-rich soils...
  15. ncbi request reprint Persistence of rock-derived nutrients in the wet tropical forests of La Selva, Costa Rica
    Stephen Porder
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 USA
    Ecology 87:594-602. 2006
    ..The results from La Selva challenge the assumption that tropical Oxisols in general have low nutrient inputs from bedrock, and support the hypothesis that erosion can increase the supply of these nutrients in lower landscape positions...
  16. pmc Ground-based and remotely sensed nutrient availability across a tropical landscape
    Stephen Porder
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:10909-12. 2005
    ..This pattern was corroborated by top-down remote sensing of area-integrated canopy phosphorus concentrations...
  17. pmc Remote analysis of biological invasion and biogeochemical change
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4383-6. 2005
    ..This remote sensing approach indicates the geographic extent, intensity, and biogeochemical impacts of two distinct invaders; its wider application could enhance the role of remote sensing in ecosystem analysis and management...
  18. ncbi request reprint Agricultural intensification: will land spared from farming be land spared for nature?
    Pamela A Matson
    School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2210, USA
    Conserv Biol 20:709-10. 2006
  19. pmc Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i
    Kristina J Anderson-Teixeira
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:228-33. 2008
    ..This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly...
  20. ncbi request reprint Temperature influences carbon accumulation in moist tropical forests
    James W Raich
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames 50011, USA
    Ecology 87:76-87. 2006
    ..These results imply that, in a warmer climate, conservation of forest biomass will be critical to the maintenance of carbon stocks in moist tropical forests...
  21. pmc Interactions of climate change with biological invasions and land use in the Hawaiian Islands: Modeling the fate of endemic birds using a geographic information system
    Tracy L Benning
    Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, Ecosystem Sciences Division, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 3110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:14246-9. 2002
    ....