Vici Varghese

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Collinearity of protease mutations in HIV-1 samples with high-level protease inhibitor class resistance
    Farbod Babrzadeh
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 68:414-8. 2013
  2. pmc Minority variants associated with transmitted and acquired HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance: implications for the use of second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 52:309-15. 2009
  3. pmc Nucleic acid template and the risk of a PCR-Induced HIV-1 drug resistance mutation
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e10992. 2010
  4. pmc HIV-1 integrase sequence variability in antiretroviral naïve patients and in triple-class experienced patients subsequently treated with raltegravir
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 26:1323-6. 2010
  5. pmc Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with the reverse transcriptase (RT) mutation Q145M retain nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT inhibitor susceptibility
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:2196-8. 2009
  6. pmc Panel of prototypical raltegravir-resistant infectious molecular clones in a novel integrase-deleted cloning vector
    Elizabeth C Reuman
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 300 Pasteur Drive, Grant Building, Room S 146, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 54:934-6. 2010
  7. pmc Panel of prototypical recombinant infectious molecular clones resistant to nevirapine, efavirenz, etravirine, and rilpivirine
    Maya Balamane
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4522-4. 2012
  8. pmc Minority human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants in antiretroviral-naive persons with reverse transcriptase codon 215 revertant mutations
    Yumi Mitsuya
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 82:10747-55. 2008
  9. pmc Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) cross-resistance: implications for preclinical evaluation of novel NNRTIs and clinical genotypic resistance testing
    George L Melikian
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 69:12-20. 2014

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Collinearity of protease mutations in HIV-1 samples with high-level protease inhibitor class resistance
    Farbod Babrzadeh
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 68:414-8. 2013
    ..To determine whether pan-protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant virus populations are composed predominantly of viruses with resistance to all PIs or of diverse virus populations with resistance to different subsets of PIs...
  2. pmc Minority variants associated with transmitted and acquired HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance: implications for the use of second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 52:309-15. 2009
    ..Therefore, we sought to determine how often NNRTI-resistant mutations other than K103N occur as minority variants in plasma samples for which standard genotypic resistance testing detects K103N alone...
  3. pmc Nucleic acid template and the risk of a PCR-Induced HIV-1 drug resistance mutation
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e10992. 2010
    ..Several lines of evidence suggest that K65R is more common in HIV-1 subtype C than subtype B viruses...
  4. pmc HIV-1 integrase sequence variability in antiretroviral naïve patients and in triple-class experienced patients subsequently treated with raltegravir
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 26:1323-6. 2010
    ..However, none of the major INI-resistance mutations was found to be polymorphic in either study and there were no significant changes in the prevalence of any of the minor INI-resistance mutations...
  5. pmc Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with the reverse transcriptase (RT) mutation Q145M retain nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT inhibitor susceptibility
    Vici Varghese
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:2196-8. 2009
    ..We report that Q145M and other Q145 mutations do not emerge with RT inhibitors nor decrease RT inhibitor susceptibility. Q145M should not, therefore, be considered an RT inhibitor resistance mutation...
  6. pmc Panel of prototypical raltegravir-resistant infectious molecular clones in a novel integrase-deleted cloning vector
    Elizabeth C Reuman
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 300 Pasteur Drive, Grant Building, Room S 146, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 54:934-6. 2010
    ..Investigational integrase inhibitors with activity against these clones are likely to retain activity against the most clinically relevant raltegravir-resistant variants...
  7. pmc Panel of prototypical recombinant infectious molecular clones resistant to nevirapine, efavirenz, etravirine, and rilpivirine
    Maya Balamane
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4522-4. 2012
    ..Each virus in the panel has intermediate- or high-level resistance to all or three of the four most commonly used NNRTIs...
  8. pmc Minority human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants in antiretroviral-naive persons with reverse transcriptase codon 215 revertant mutations
    Yumi Mitsuya
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 82:10747-55. 2008
    ....
  9. pmc Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) cross-resistance: implications for preclinical evaluation of novel NNRTIs and clinical genotypic resistance testing
    George L Melikian
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 69:12-20. 2014
    ....