Matt van de Rijn

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Gene expression studies on soft tissue tumors
    Matt van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1531-4. 2002
  2. pmc Discovery of molecular subtypes in leiomyosarcoma through integrative molecular profiling
    A H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oncogene 29:845-54. 2010
  3. pmc A compact VEGF signature associated with distant metastases and poor outcomes
    Zhiyuan Hu
    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    BMC Med 7:9. 2009
  4. pmc Gross genomic alterations and gene expression profiles of high- grade serous carcinoma of the ovary with and without BRCA1 inactivation
    Manohar Pradhan
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia and Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    BMC Cancer 10:493. 2010
  5. pmc Expression of cytokeratins 17 and 5 identifies a group of breast carcinomas with poor clinical outcome
    Matt van de Rijn
    L235 Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1991-6. 2002
  6. ncbi Applications of microarrays to histopathology
    M van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Histopathology 44:97-108. 2004
  7. ncbi The role of microarray technologies in the study of soft tissue tumours
    R B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Histopathology 48:22-31. 2006
  8. ncbi Genetics of soft tissue tumors
    Matt van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Pathol 1:435-66. 2006
  9. pmc Coordinate expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 and colony-stimulating factor-1-related proteins is associated with poor prognosis in gynecological and nongynecological leiomyosarcoma
    Inigo Espinosa
    Dept of Pathology, L 235, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 174:2347-56. 2009
  10. ncbi Placental S100 (S100P) and GATA3: markers for transitional epithelium and urothelial carcinoma discovered by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 31:673-80. 2007

Research Grants

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Detail Information

Publications77

  1. pmc Gene expression studies on soft tissue tumors
    Matt van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1531-4. 2002
  2. pmc Discovery of molecular subtypes in leiomyosarcoma through integrative molecular profiling
    A H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oncogene 29:845-54. 2010
    ..04). In this analysis that combined gene expression profiling, aCGH and IHC, we characterized distinct molecular LMS subtypes, provided insight into their pathogenesis, and identified prognostic biomarkers...
  3. pmc A compact VEGF signature associated with distant metastases and poor outcomes
    Zhiyuan Hu
    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    BMC Med 7:9. 2009
    ..Tumor metastases pose the greatest threat to a patient's survival, and thus, understanding the biology of disseminated cancer cells is critical for developing effective therapies...
  4. pmc Gross genomic alterations and gene expression profiles of high- grade serous carcinoma of the ovary with and without BRCA1 inactivation
    Manohar Pradhan
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia and Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    BMC Cancer 10:493. 2010
    ..The loss of BRCA1 function due to either germline/somatic mutation or epigenetic silencing is observed in most high-grade serous carcinomas of the ovary...
  5. pmc Expression of cytokeratins 17 and 5 identifies a group of breast carcinomas with poor clinical outcome
    Matt van de Rijn
    L235 Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1991-6. 2002
    ..Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that in node-negative breast carcinoma, expression of these cytokeratins was a prognostic factor independent of tumor size and tumor grade...
  6. ncbi Applications of microarrays to histopathology
    M van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Histopathology 44:97-108. 2004
    ..In this review we give a brief overview of microarray technology and research uses, and discuss potential applications of microarrays in the practice of diagnostic histopathology...
  7. ncbi The role of microarray technologies in the study of soft tissue tumours
    R B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Histopathology 48:22-31. 2006
    ..This review addresses some of the advantages, problems, and solutions to those problems that come with these technologies...
  8. ncbi Genetics of soft tissue tumors
    Matt van de Rijn
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Pathol 1:435-66. 2006
    ..Here we describe the known molecular changes in a number of sarcomas and focus on novel scientific approaches that can be expected to lead to improved diagnosis, prognostication, and therapy of sarcoma...
  9. pmc Coordinate expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 and colony-stimulating factor-1-related proteins is associated with poor prognosis in gynecological and nongynecological leiomyosarcoma
    Inigo Espinosa
    Dept of Pathology, L 235, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 174:2347-56. 2009
    ..2; 95% CI, 1.12 to 16; P = 0.03). Our findings indicate that CSF1 may play an important role in the clinical behavior of LMS that may open a window for new therapeutic reagents...
  10. ncbi Placental S100 (S100P) and GATA3: markers for transitional epithelium and urothelial carcinoma discovered by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 31:673-80. 2007
    ..We conclude that the detection of S100P and GATA3 protein expression may help distinguish urothelial carcinomas from other genitourinary neoplasms that enter into the differential diagnosis...
  11. ncbi The gene expression profile of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma
    Subbaya Subramanian
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94035, USA
    J Pathol 206:433-44. 2005
    ..Small molecule inhibitors for PPARG exist and PPARG could be a potential therapeutic target for EMC...
  12. pmc Variations in stromal signatures in breast and colorectal cancer metastases
    Jonathan A Webster
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Pathol 222:158-65. 2010
    ..The preservation of the CSF1 macrophage response pattern in metastases lends support to targeting the CSF1 pathway in cancer...
  13. doi Prognostic significance of macrophage infiltration in leiomyosarcomas
    Cheng Han Lee
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 14:1423-30. 2008
    ..Their presence is associated with poor clinical outcome in a variety of epithelial malignancies. The aim of this study is to examine the prognostic significance of tumor-associated macrophages in sarcomas...
  14. pmc Determination of stromal signatures in breast carcinoma
    Robert B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 3:e187. 2005
    ..Our findings suggest that the host stromal response varies significantly among carcinomas and that gene expression patterns characteristic of soft tissue tumors can be used to discover new markers for normal connective tissue cells...
  15. doi hCAP-D3 expression marks a prostate cancer subtype with favorable clinical behavior and androgen signaling signature
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 51, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 32:205-9. 2008
    ..019). Our findings identify hCAP-D3 as a new biomarker for subtype-1 tumors that improves prognostication, and reveal androgen signaling as an important biologic feature of this potentially clinically favorable molecular subtype...
  16. pmc Anti-KIT monoclonal antibody inhibits imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumor growth
    Badreddin Edris
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:3501-6. 2013
    ..These results suggest that treatment with mAbs targeting KIT may represent an alternative, or complementary, approach for treating GIST...
  17. pmc Expression of subtype-specific group 1 leiomyosarcoma markers in a wide variety of sarcomas by gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry
    Anne M Mills
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 35:583-9. 2011
    ....
  18. doi A novel monoclonal antibody against DOG1 is a sensitive and specific marker for gastrointestinal stromal tumors
    Inigo Espinosa
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 32:210-8. 2008
    ..5%) synovial sarcomas among the 935 soft tissue tumors examined showed positive immunostaining for DOG1.1. In addition, DOG1.1 immunoreactivity was seen in fewer cases of carcinoma, melanoma, and seminoma as compared with KIT...
  19. pmc ROR2 is a novel prognostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target in leiomyosarcoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour
    Badreddin Edris
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    J Pathol 227:223-33. 2012
    ..Together, these results show that ROR2 is a useful prognostic indicator in the clinical management of these soft-tissue sarcomas and may represent a novel therapeutic target...
  20. doi Gene expression profiling identifies p63 as a diagnostic marker for giant cell tumor of the bone
    Cheng Han Lee
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mod Pathol 21:531-9. 2008
    ..These findings altogether show that p63 can be used as a diagnostic marker to aid the clinical diagnosis of GCTOB...
  21. doi The fibromatosis signature defines a robust stromal response in breast carcinoma
    Andrew H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Lab Invest 88:591-601. 2008
    ..Our data demonstrate that the DTF core gene set is a robust descriptor of a distinct stromal response that is associated with improved clinical outcome in breast cancer patients...
  22. ncbi Translocation and expression of CSF1 in pigmented villonodular synovitis, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, rheumatoid arthritis and other reactive synovitides
    John S Cupp
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 31:970-6. 2007
    ....
  23. ncbi The prognostic value of tumor-associated macrophages in leiomyosarcoma: a single institution study
    Kristen N Ganjoo
    Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA
    Am J Clin Oncol 34:82-6. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of patients with LMS from a single institution according to the number of TAMs evaluated through 3 CSF1 associated proteins...
  24. doi The clinicopathologic features of YWHAE-FAM22 endometrial stromal sarcomas: a histologically high-grade and clinically aggressive tumor
    Cheng Han Lee
    Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 36:641-53. 2012
    ..Thus, their distinction from typical JAZF1 ESS is important for prognostic and therapeutic purposes...
  25. ncbi A variant TMPRSS2 isoform and ERG fusion product in prostate cancer with implications for molecular diagnosis
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5176, USA
    Mod Pathol 20:467-73. 2007
    ....
  26. pmc The macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 response signature in breast carcinoma
    Andrew H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 15:778-87. 2009
    ..The purpose of this study was to define a novel CSF1 response signature and to evaluate its clinical and biological significance in breast cancer...
  27. pmc Endogenous versus tumor-specific host response to breast carcinoma: a study of stromal response in synchronous breast primaries and biopsy site changes
    Julie M Wu
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 17:437-46. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study is to elucidate the basis of this stromal response--whether they are elicited by individual tumors or whether they represent an endogenous host reaction produced by the patient...
  28. pmc Gene expression patterns in pancreatic tumors, cells and tissues
    Anson W Lowe
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e323. 2007
    ..This study provides a comprehensive assessment of gene expression for pancreatic tumors, the normal pancreas, and nonneoplastic pancreatic disease...
  29. pmc Gene expression patterns and gene copy number changes in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans
    Sabine C Linn
    Departments of Pathology, Genetics, and Biochemistry, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 163:2383-95. 2003
    ....
  30. ncbi Apo D in soft tissue tumors: a novel marker for dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans
    Robert B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 28:1063-9. 2004
    ..stanford.edu/tma_portal/apod/). We conclude that Apo D is strongly expressed in DFSPs and neural lesions and may be useful in differentiating DFSP from fibrous histiocytoma...
  31. pmc Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds
    Howard Y Chang
    Department of Dermatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:E7. 2004
    ..Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas...
  32. ncbi Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with KIT and PDGFRA mutations have distinct gene expression profiles
    Subbaya Subramanian
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oncogene 23:7780-90. 2004
    ..These gene products could serve as highly selective therapeutic targets in GISTs containing the KIT or PDGFRA mutational types with which they are associated...
  33. doi Desktop transcriptome sequencing from archival tissue to identify clinically relevant translocations
    Robert T Sweeney
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 37:796-803. 2013
    ..The results show that a single transcriptome HTS assay, from FFPE, has the potential to replace conventional molecular diagnostic techniques for the evaluation of clinically relevant mutations in cancer...
  34. pmc CSF1 expression in nongynecological leiomyosarcoma is associated with increased tumor angiogenesis
    Inigo Espinosa
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, Spain
    Am J Pathol 179:2100-7. 2011
    ..Together, these findings suggest an important role for CSF1 and the resulting TAM infiltration in the pathological neovascularization of LMS tumors and provide a rationale for CSF1-targeted therapies in LMS...
  35. pmc A tri-marker proliferation index predicts biochemical recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer
    Sameer Malhotra
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20293. 2011
    ..Our findings highlight the potential value of a multi-gene signature-based diagnostic, and define a tri-marker proliferation index with possible utility for improved prognostication and treatment stratification in prostate cancer...
  36. doi Characterization of a novel anti-fatty acid synthase (FASN) antiserum in breast tissue
    Kristin C Jensen
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mod Pathol 21:1413-20. 2008
    ..In addition, FASN expression is described in apocrine metaplasia, columnar cell lesions, and flat epithelial atypia...
  37. pmc The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database
    Robert J Marinelli
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 36:D871-7. 2008
    ..The production server uses the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle Database and Perl application code. Source code is available to interested researchers under a no-cost license...
  38. pmc Human melanoma-initiating cells express neural crest nerve growth factor receptor CD271
    Alexander D Boiko
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94304 5542, USA
    Nature 466:133-7. 2010
    ....
  39. pmc A DNA microarray survey of gene expression in normal human tissues
    Radha Shyamsundar
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, CCSR 3245A, Stanford, CA 94305 5176, USA
    Genome Biol 6:R22. 2005
    ....
  40. pmc A landscape effect in tenosynovial giant-cell tumor from activation of CSF1 expression by a translocation in a minority of tumor cells
    Robert B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:690-5. 2006
    ....
  41. pmc Antibody therapy targeting the CD47 protein is effective in a model of aggressive metastatic leiomyosarcoma
    Badreddin Edris
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:6656-61. 2012
    ..These data suggest that treatment with anti-CD47 antibodies not only reduces primary tumor size but can also be used to inhibit the development of, or to eliminate, metastatic disease...
  42. pmc Oncogenic regulators and substrates of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome are frequently overexpressed in malignant tumors
    Norman L Lehman
    Department of Pathology, MC5324, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Am J Pathol 170:1793-805. 2007
    ..This profile of misregulated mitotic APC/C substrates and regulators in malignant tumors suggests that analysis of this pathway may be diagnostically useful and represent a potentially important therapeutic target...
  43. ncbi High-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization for distinguishing paraffin-embedded Spitz nevi and melanomas
    Jeff D Harvell
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Diagn Mol Pathol 13:22-5. 2004
    ....
  44. doi Diffuse myogenin expression by immunohistochemistry is an independent marker of poor survival in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma: a tissue microarray study of 71 primary tumors including correlation with molecular phenotype
    Amy Heerema-McKenney
    Department of Pathology parallelBiochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 32:1513-22. 2008
    ..034) and OS (P=0.0069). In this retrospective analysis, diffuse immunohistochemical reactivity for myogenin in RMS correlates with decreased RFI and OS, independent of histologic subtype, translocation status, tumor site, or stage...
  45. pmc Gene expression in the normal adult human kidney assessed by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:649-56. 2004
    ..The distinctive patterns of gene expression in discrete portions of the kidney may serve as a resource for further understanding of renal physiology and the molecular and cellular organization of the nephron...
  46. pmc The novel marker, DOG1, is expressed ubiquitously in gastrointestinal stromal tumors irrespective of KIT or PDGFRA mutation status
    Robert B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 165:107-13. 2004
    ..Reactivity for DOG1 may aid in the diagnosis of GISTs, including PDGFRA mutants that fail to express KIT antigen, and lead to appropriate treatment with imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of the KIT tyrosine kinase...
  47. pmc The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors
    Stephen B Willingham
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:6662-7. 2012
    ..CD47 is therefore a validated target for cancer therapies...
  48. pmc SMURF1 amplification promotes invasiveness in pancreatic cancer
    Kevin A Kwei
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e23924. 2011
    ..Together, these findings identify SMURF1 as an amplified oncogene driving multiple tumorigenic phenotypes in pancreatic cancer, and provide a new druggable target for molecularly directed therapy...
  49. doi Systematic analysis of breast cancer morphology uncovers stromal features associated with survival
    Andrew H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Sci Transl Med 3:108ra113. 2011
    ..These findings implicate stromal morphologic structure as a previously unrecognized prognostic determinant for breast cancer...
  50. ncbi The retinoic acid synthesis gene ALDH1a2 is a candidate tumor suppressor in prostate cancer
    Hanna Kim
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5176, USA
    Cancer Res 65:8118-24. 2005
    ..Taken together, our findings implicate ALDH1a2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer and further support a role of retinoids in the prevention or treatment of prostate cancer...
  51. pmc CDX2 is an amplified lineage-survival oncogene in colorectal cancer
    Keyan Salari
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:E3196-205. 2012
    ..Our findings challenge a prevailing view that CDX2 is a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer and uncover an additional piece in the multistep model of colorectal tumorigenesis...
  52. doi Diagnostic implications of podoplanin expression in peripheral nerve sheath neoplasms
    Chris H Jokinen
    Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
    Am J Clin Pathol 129:886-93. 2008
    ..These results suggest diffuse podoplanin expression or coexpression of podoplanin and S-100 is limited to schwannoma and EMPNST and may be useful in the evaluation of these neoplasms...
  53. doi A systems biology approach to anatomic diversity of skin
    John L Rinn
    Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 128:776-82. 2008
    ..The use of gene, tiling, and tissue microarrays together gives a comprehensive view of the gene regulation involved in patterning the skin...
  54. ncbi The utility of PAX5 immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of undifferentiated malignant neoplasms
    Kristin C Jensen
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mod Pathol 20:871-7. 2007
    ..Lastly, we have shown that the lack of its expression at the protein level in many epithelial and mesenchymal neoplasms renders PAX5 expression an extremely specific marker of the B lineage...
  55. pmc Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is widely expressed by cancer-associated stromal cells and can promote tumor cell proliferation
    Julie B Sneddon
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:14842-7. 2006
    ..Our data suggest that BMP antagonists may be important constituents of tumor stroma, providing a favorable microenvironment for cancer cell survival and expansion in many cancers...
  56. pmc Identification, molecular characterization, clinical prognosis, and therapeutic targeting of human bladder tumor-initiating cells
    Keith Syson Chan
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304 5542, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:14016-21. 2009
    ..Blockade of CD47 by a mAb resulted in macrophage engulfment of bladder cancer cells in vitro. In summary, we have identified a T-IC subpopulation with potential prognostic and therapeutic value for invasive bladder cancer...
  57. pmc Endothelial cell diversity revealed by global expression profiling
    Jen Tsan Chi
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:10623-8. 2003
    ..Tissue-specific expression patterns in different tissue microvascular ECs suggest they are distinct differentiated cell types that play roles in the local physiology of their respective organs and tissues...
  58. doi Sox10 and S100 in the diagnosis of soft-tissue neoplasms
    Jason R Karamchandani
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA 94025, USA
    Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 20:445-50. 2012
    ..Sox10 should be used in the place of or along with S100 in soft tissue tumor diagnosis...
  59. pmc Genomic profiling identifies GATA6 as a candidate oncogene amplified in pancreatobiliary cancer
    Kevin A Kwei
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Genet 4:e1000081. 2008
    ....
  60. pmc 3'-end sequencing for expression quantification (3SEQ) from archival tumor samples
    Andrew H Beck
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e8768. 2010
    ..These findings demonstrate that 3SEQ is an effective technique for gene expression profiling from archival tumor samples and may facilitate significant advances in translational cancer research...
  61. pmc Engineered SIRP╬▒ variants as immunotherapeutic adjuvants to anticancer antibodies
    Kipp Weiskopf
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 341:88-91. 2013
    ..This "one-two punch" directs immune responses against tumor cells while lowering the threshold for macrophage activation, thereby providing a universal method for augmenting the efficacy of therapeutic anticancer antibodies. ..
  62. pmc Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:811-6. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that prostate tumors can be usefully classified according to their gene expression patterns, and these tumor subtypes may provide a basis for improved prognostication and treatment stratification...
  63. pmc Gene expression patterns in renal cell carcinoma assessed by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 162:925-32. 2003
    ..Characterization of renal cell carcinomas based on gene expression patterns provides a revised classification of these tumors and has the potential to supply significant biological and clinical insights...
  64. pmc Gene expression patterns in ovarian carcinomas
    Marci E Schaner
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5151, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 14:4376-86. 2003
    ....
  65. ncbi Hep par 1 antibody stain for the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: 676 tumors tested using tissue microarrays and conventional tissue sections
    Zhen Fan
    Department of Pathology L235, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Mod Pathol 16:137-44. 2003
    ....
  66. pmc LC3-mediated fibronectin mRNA translation induces fibrosarcoma growth by increasing connective tissue growth factor
    Lihua Ying
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cell Sci 122:1441-51. 2009
    ..Expression profiling of soft tissue tumors revealed increased expression of both LC3 and CTGF in some locally invasive tumor types...
  67. doi Gene expression profiling for the investigation of soft tissue sarcoma pathogenesis and the identification of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers
    Andrew H Beck
    Pathology Department, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Virchows Arch 456:141-51. 2010
    ..Lastly, we conclude with a discussion of strategies to further optimize the translation of gene expression data into a greater understanding of sarcoma pathogenesis and improved clinical outcomes for sarcoma patients...
  68. pmc Robustness, scalability, and integration of a wound-response gene expression signature in predicting breast cancer survival
    Howard Y Chang
    Program in Epithelial Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:3738-43. 2005
    ....
  69. ncbi Gene expression profiles of cutaneous B cell lymphoma
    Monique N Storz
    Department of Pathology, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 120:865-70. 2003
    ....
  70. ncbi Experimental approaches to the study of cancer-stroma interactions: recent findings suggest a pivotal role for stroma in carcinogenesis
    Robert B West
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Lab Invest 87:967-70. 2007
    ..Major hurdles in the study of the cancer stroma revolve around the cellular complexity of the tumor microenvironment, both in modeling the microenvironment and discovering/isolating pure populations of stromal cell types...
  71. ncbi Challenges in developing a molecular characterization of cancer
    Jonathan R Pollack
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Semin Oncol 29:280-5. 2002
    ..Here, we detail some of the challenges in developing a molecular characterization of cancer and in translating these new discoveries towards clinical utility...
  72. ncbi Follicular dendritic cell immunohistochemical markers in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma
    Megan L Troxell
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 13:297-303. 2005
    ..Thus, CD21 remains the most reliable marker of follicular dendritic cells in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma...
  73. pmc Diversity, topographic differentiation, and positional memory in human fibroblasts
    Howard Y Chang
    Departments of Dermatology, Biochemistry, Pathology, and Genetics, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:12877-82. 2002
    ....
  74. ncbi A novel method for making "tissue" microarrays from small numbers of suspension cells
    Kelli Montgomery
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 13:80-4. 2005
    ..This method is also amenable for use for cultured cells...
  75. pmc Software tools for high-throughput analysis and archiving of immunohistochemistry staining data obtained with tissue microarrays
    Chih Long Liu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1557-65. 2002
    ..An on-line demonstration of this system is available at http://genome-www.stanford.edu/TMA/explore.shtml...

Research Grants6

  1. Molecular Characterization of Leiomyosarcoma and GIST
    JAN VAN DE RIJN; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. Molecular Characterization of Leiomyosarcoma and GIST
    JAN VAN DE RIJN; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Molecular Characterization of Leiomyosarcoma and GIST
    Matt van de Rijn; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  4. Molecular Characterization of Leiomyosarcoma and GIST
    JAN VAN DE RIJN; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  5. Clinically relevant molecular subtypes in leiomyosarcoma
    JAN MATT VAN DE RIJN; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..In this grant we will develop a clinically robust classifier of molecular subtypes of leiomyosarcoma, improve outcome prediction, and identify novel potential treatment options for LMS. ..