Paul J Utz,

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Human autoimmune sera as molecular probes for the identification of an autoantigen kinase signaling pathway
    Makoto Kamachi
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 196:1213-25. 2002
  2. pmc Specific post-translational histone modifications of neutrophil extracellular traps as immunogens and potential targets of lupus autoantibodies
    Chih Long Liu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:R25. 2012
  3. pmc Interpreting interest in interferon-alpha
    Donna L Thibault
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:246-8. 2003
  4. pmc Type I interferon receptor controls B-cell expression of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors and autoantibody production in a murine model of lupus
    Donna L Thibault
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 11:R112. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint "Hot technologies" for clinical immunology research
    Paul J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Immunol 111:153-4. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Multiplexed assays for identification of biomarkers and surrogate markers in systemic lupus erythematosus
    P J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Lupus 13:304-11. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Protein arrays for studying blood cells and their secreted products
    Paul J Utz
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunol Rev 204:264-82. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Life and death decisions: regulation of apoptosis by proteolysis of signaling molecules
    P J Utz
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Death Differ 7:589-602. 2000
  9. pmc Unlocking the "PAD" lock on rheumatoid arthritis
    P J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Ann Rheum Dis 63:330-2. 2004
  10. pmc Death, autoantigen modifications, and tolerance
    P J Utz
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res 2:101-14. 2000

Detail Information

Publications60

  1. pmc Human autoimmune sera as molecular probes for the identification of an autoantigen kinase signaling pathway
    Makoto Kamachi
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 196:1213-25. 2002
    ....
  2. pmc Specific post-translational histone modifications of neutrophil extracellular traps as immunogens and potential targets of lupus autoantibodies
    Chih Long Liu
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:R25. 2012
    ..We hypothesized that NETs and their unique histone PTMs might be capable of inducing autoantibodies that target histones...
  3. pmc Interpreting interest in interferon-alpha
    Donna L Thibault
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:246-8. 2003
  4. pmc Type I interferon receptor controls B-cell expression of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors and autoantibody production in a murine model of lupus
    Donna L Thibault
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 11:R112. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint "Hot technologies" for clinical immunology research
    Paul J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Immunol 111:153-4. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Multiplexed assays for identification of biomarkers and surrogate markers in systemic lupus erythematosus
    P J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Lupus 13:304-11. 2004
    ..Their potential and pitfalls for monitoring patients with SLE, particularly those enrolled in clinical trials testing novel therapeutics, will be discussed...
  7. ncbi request reprint Protein arrays for studying blood cells and their secreted products
    Paul J Utz
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunol Rev 204:264-82. 2005
    ..Dissemination of protein array technology will occur in the next decade and will markedly change how immunology research, particularly in the fields of autoimmunity and inflammation, is conducted...
  8. ncbi request reprint Life and death decisions: regulation of apoptosis by proteolysis of signaling molecules
    P J Utz
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Death Differ 7:589-602. 2000
    ..By acting as executioners and as important 'molecular sensors' of the degree of cellular injury, the signaling proteins described in this review are strong candidates to mediate downstream events, both in condemned and in viable cells...
  9. pmc Unlocking the "PAD" lock on rheumatoid arthritis
    P J Utz
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Ann Rheum Dis 63:330-2. 2004
  10. pmc Death, autoantigen modifications, and tolerance
    P J Utz
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res 2:101-14. 2000
    ..This review will address the potential role played by death-specific modifications of autoantigens in bypassing tolerance to highly conserved autoantigens, including nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins...
  11. pmc 21st European Workshop for Rheumatology Research, Vienna, Austria, 1-4 March 2001
    P J Utz
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunolgy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Res 3:237-40. 2001
    ..Arthritis researchers from around the globe should be strongly encouraged to attend future meetings, the next of which is the 22nd EWRR meeting in Leiden, the Netherlands, in 2002...
  12. pmc Autoantibody profiling for the study and treatment of autoimmune disease
    Wolfgang Hueber
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    Arthritis Res 4:290-5. 2002
    ..In the coming decades, proteomics technologies will broaden our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of and will further our ability to diagnose, prognosticate and treat autoimmune disease...
  13. ncbi request reprint Millennium Award. Proteomics for the development of DNA tolerizing vaccines to treat autoimmune disease
    William H Robinson
    Department of Neurology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Clin Immunol 103:7-12. 2002
    ..Through integration of proteomics with specific tolerizing therapies, we are developing a comprehensive approach to treat human autoimmune disease...
  14. ncbi request reprint Multiplexed protein array platforms for analysis of autoimmune diseases
    Imelda Balboni
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 24:391-418. 2006
    ..We conclude by reviewing advances in biomedical informatics that will eventually allow the human proteome to be deciphered...
  15. pmc Peptide-coated nanotube-based biosensor for the detection of disease-specific autoantibodies in human serum
    Katerina A Drouvalakis
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biosens Bioelectron 23:1413-21. 2008
    ..The performance of our label-free biosensor enables its application in the direct assay of sera in research and diagnostics...
  16. ncbi request reprint Technology insight: can autoantibody profiling improve clinical practice?
    Veronika Sharp
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 3:96-103. 2007
    ..We highlight recent applications for antibody profiling, as well as the challenges that need to be faced before such technologies enter the clinic...
  17. ncbi request reprint High-throughput methods for measuring autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases
    Kareem L Graham
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Autoimmunity 37:269-72. 2004
    ..However, the next set of challenges is just right around the corner. As data and statistical analysis tools become more robust, it will be possible to generate and approach new hypotheses at an unprecedented pace...
  18. ncbi request reprint An array of possibilities for the study of autoimmunity
    C Garrison Fathman
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 435:605-11. 2005
    ..Genomic and proteomic technologies are already providing useful information about autoimmune disease, and they are likely to lead to important discoveries within the next decade...
  19. pmc The U1-snRNP complex: structural properties relating to autoimmune pathogenesis in rheumatic diseases
    Nicole H Kattah
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunol Rev 233:126-45. 2010
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Autoantigen microarrays for multiplex characterization of autoantibody responses
    William H Robinson
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 8:295-301. 2002
    ..Autoantigen microarrays represent a powerful tool to study the specificity and pathogenesis of autoantibody responses, and to identify and define relevant autoantigens in human autoimmune diseases...
  21. ncbi request reprint Proteomics technologies for the study of autoimmune disease
    William H Robinson
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 46:885-93. 2002
  22. ncbi request reprint Protein and peptide array analysis of autoimmune disease
    William H Robinson
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biotechniques . 2002
    ..Proteomic determination of autoantibody profiles can be utilized for diagnosis, prognostication, and guiding tolerizing therapy for autoimmune disease...
  23. pmc Evaluation of microarray surfaces and arraying parameters for autoantibody profiling
    Imelda Balboni
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proteomics 8:3443-9. 2008
    ..By optimizing the major variables in our autoantigen microarray platform, subtle differences in serum samples can be identified that will shed light on disease pathogenesis...
  24. ncbi request reprint Antigen microarray profiling of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis
    Wolfgang Hueber
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 52:2645-55. 2005
    ....
  25. pmc Regulation of human Th9 differentiation by type I interferons and IL-21
    Michael T Wong
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunol Cell Biol 88:624-31. 2010
    ..Taken together, these data indicate a complex cytokine network in the regulation of human IL-9-producing CD4(+) T cells...
  26. ncbi request reprint Protein microarrays guide tolerizing DNA vaccine treatment of autoimmune encephalomyelitis
    William H Robinson
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 21:1033-9. 2003
    ..Proteomic monitoring of autoantibody responses provides a useful approach to monitor autoimmune disease and to develop and tailor disease- and patient-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines...
  27. pmc Microarray profiling of antibody responses against simian-human immunodeficiency virus: postchallenge convergence of reactivities independent of host histocompatibility type and vaccine regimen
    Henry E Neuman de Vegvar
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:11125-38. 2003
    ..These data suggest that the functional diversity of anti-SHIV B-cell responses is highly limited in the presence of persisting antigen...
  28. ncbi request reprint Protein arrays for autoantibody profiling and fine-specificity mapping
    William H Robinson
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Proteomics 3:2077-84. 2003
    ..In addition to identifying autoantigens and mapping immunodominant epitopes, proteomic analysis of autoantibody responses will further enable diagnosis, prognosis, and tailoring of antigen-specific tolerizing therapy...
  29. ncbi request reprint Genomic and proteomic analysis of multiple sclerosis. Opinion
    William H Robinson
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Immunol 15:660-7. 2003
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint A new two-color Fab labeling method for autoantigen protein microarrays
    Michael G Kattah
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Methods 3:745-51. 2006
    ..The improved labeling and detection method described here overcomes several problems that have hindered antigen microarrays and should facilitate translation to the clinical setting...
  31. ncbi request reprint Characterization of novel antigens recognized by serum autoantibodies from anti-CD1 TCR-transgenic lupus mice
    Wolfgang Hueber
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eur J Immunol 34:1654-62. 2004
    ..Serological and biochemical characterization suggested that p105 was distinct from known lupus autoantigens of similar molecular masses, indicating that p105 represents a novel autoantigen in lupus...
  32. ncbi request reprint Granzyme B is dispensable for immunologic tolerance to self in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus
    Kareem L Graham
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 52:1684-93. 2005
    ..In this study, we evaluated the role of granzyme B in a murine model of autoimmunity...
  33. pmc Naive CD4 t cell proliferation is controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin regulation of GRAIL expression
    Jack T Lin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 182:5919-28. 2009
    ..Our findings also extend the role of GRAIL beyond anergy induction and maintenance, suggesting that endogenous GRAIL regulates general cell cycle and proliferation of primary naive CD4 T cells...
  34. doi request reprint Failure of oral atorvastatin to modulate a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus
    Kareem L Graham
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 58:2098-104. 2008
    ..In this study, we attempted to treat a widely studied murine model of spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with atorvastatin...
  35. pmc Modulation of peripheral B cell tolerance by CD72 in a murine model
    Daniel Hsieh Hsin Li
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 58:3192-204. 2008
    ..The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of CD72 in modulating B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated tolerogenic signaling and peripheral B cell tolerance...
  36. pmc HIT: a versatile proteomics platform for multianalyte phenotyping of cytokines, intracellular proteins and surface molecules
    Michael G Kattah
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Med 14:1284-9. 2008
    ..HIT arrays are an ideal platform for rapidly identifying markers for further characterization and therapeutic intervention...
  37. pmc Selective tyrosine kinase inhibition by imatinib mesylate for the treatment of autoimmune arthritis
    Ricardo T Paniagua
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 116:2633-42. 2006
    ..Imatinib-mediated inhibition of a spectrum of signal transduction pathways and the downstream pathogenic cellular responses may provide a powerful approach to treat RA and other inflammatory diseases...
  38. ncbi request reprint Role of MHC-linked genes in autoantigen selection and renal disease in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus
    Hideharu Sekine
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina and the Medical Research Service, Ralph H Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
    J Immunol 177:7423-34. 2006
    ..These results indicate that genes encoded within or closely linked to the MHC region regulate autoantigen selection and isotype switching to IgG3 but have minimal effect on end-organ damage or survival in MRL/lpr mice...
  39. ncbi request reprint Autoantigen arrays for multiplex analysis of antibody isotypes
    Kareem L Graham
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proteomics 6:5720-4. 2006
    ..This platform can be easily adapted to a variety of applications, and has the potential to elucidate mechanisms that govern development and evolution of antibody responses in in vivo and in vitro systems...
  40. doi request reprint Treatment with a toll-like receptor inhibitory GpG oligonucleotide delays and attenuates lupus nephritis in NZB/W mice
    Kareem L Graham
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Autoimmunity 43:140-55. 2010
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint Interferon-alpha-inducible proteins are novel autoantigens in murine lupus
    Wolfgang Hueber
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, 94305, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 50:3239-49. 2004
    ..To investigate the spectrum of B cell autoimmunity in the recently described anti-CD1-autoreactive T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic murine lupus-like (CD1 lupus-like) model...
  42. ncbi request reprint The challenge of analyzing the proteome in humans with autoimmune diseases
    Steven M Chan
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University of Medicine, CCSR Building, Room 2215A, 269 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1062:61-8. 2005
    ..In particular, major pitfalls in the study of the human proteome are pointed out, and important areas for immediate investigation to move the field forward as rapidly as possible are proposed...
  43. pmc IFN regulatory factor 5 is required for disease development in the FcgammaRIIB-/-Yaa and FcgammaRIIB-/- mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus
    Christophe Richez
    Renal Section, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    J Immunol 184:796-806. 2010
    ..Overall, we demonstrate that IRF5 plays an essential role in lupus pathogenesis in murine models and that this is mediated through pathways beyond that of type I IFN production...
  44. pmc The ubiquitin modifying enzyme A20 restricts B cell survival and prevents autoimmunity
    Rita M Tavares
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Immunity 33:181-91. 2010
    ..These findings show that A20 can restrict B cell survival, whereas A20 protects other cells from TNF-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate how reduced A20 expression predisposes to autoimmunity...
  45. doi request reprint Protein microarrays with carbon nanotubes as multicolor Raman labels
    Zhuo Chen
    Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Mudd Building, Room 121, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 26:1285-92. 2008
    ..SWNT Raman tags are not subject to photobleaching or quenching. By conjugating different antibodies to pure (12)C and (13)C SWNT isotopes, we demonstrate multiplexed two-color SWNT Raman-based protein detection...
  46. ncbi request reprint Protein microarrays for multiplex analysis of signal transduction pathways
    Steven M Chan
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Med 10:1390-6. 2004
    ..RPP microarrays, prepared using simple procedures and standard microarray equipment, represent a powerful new tool for the study of signal transduction in both health and disease...
  47. pmc IRF9 and STAT1 are required for IgG autoantibody production and B cell expression of TLR7 in mice
    Donna L Thibault
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Clin Invest 118:1417-26. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that IFN-I is upstream of TLR signaling in the activation of autoreactive B cells in SLE...
  48. ncbi request reprint Sources of autoantigens in systemic lupus erythematosus
    Kareem L Graham
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 17:513-7. 2005
    ..We will focus on events related to apoptosis, viral infection, cytokine production, innate immune system components, and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA transcripts...
  49. ncbi request reprint Single-cell analysis of siRNA-mediated gene silencing using multiparameter flow cytometry
    Steven M Chan
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cytometry A 69:59-65. 2006
    ..Individual cells displaying a knockdown phenotype can be selectively interrogated for functional responses using multiparameter analysis...
  50. pmc Cholinergic modulation of angiogenesis: role of the 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
    Jenny C F Wu
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Biochem 108:433-46. 2009
    ..Other subunits play a modulatory role. These findings may have therapeutic implications for diseases characterized by pathological angiogenesis...
  51. ncbi request reprint Antibodies in scleroderma: direct pathogenicity and phenotypic associations
    Lorinda Chung
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1000 Welch Road, Suite 203, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Rheumatol Rep 6:156-63. 2004
    ..This review will summarize the various autoantibodies associated with scleroderma, their putative pathogenic roles, and their phenotypic correlations...
  52. pmc Proteome-wide analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies several PHD fingers as novel direct and selective binding modules of histone H3 methylated at either lysine 4 or lysine 36
    Xiaobing Shi
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 282:2450-5. 2007
    ..Together, our study suggests that a common function for PHD fingers is to transduce methyl-lysine events and sheds light on how a single histone modification can be linked to multiple biological outcomes...
  53. pmc Notch signals positively regulate activity of the mTOR pathway in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
    Steven M Chan
    Division of Immunology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Blood 110:278-86. 2007
    ..T-ALL cell growth was suppressed in a highly synergistic manner by simultaneous treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and GSI, which represents a rational drug combination for treating this aggressive human malignancy...
  54. pmc Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes for highly specific electronic biosensors
    Robert J Chen
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:4984-9. 2003
    ..This scheme, combined with the sensitivity of nanotube electronic devices, enables highly specific electronic sensors for detecting clinically important biomolecules such as antibodies associated with human autoimmune diseases...
  55. ncbi request reprint On-chip coupling of isoelectric focusing and free solution electrophoresis for multidimensional separations
    Amy E Herr
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4021, USA
    Anal Chem 75:1180-7. 2003
    ..The peak capacity of the 2D system was approximately 1300. A comprehensive 2D analysis of a fluid volume spanning 15% of the total IEF channel length was completed in less than 5 min...
  56. ncbi request reprint Murine CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells fail to undergo chromatin remodeling across the proximal promoter region of the IL-2 gene
    Leon Su
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 173:4994-5001. 2004
    ....
  57. doi request reprint Protein microarrays address the elephant in the room
    Michael G Kattah
    Clin Chem 54:937-9. 2008
  58. ncbi request reprint Induction of antigen-specific tolerance in multiple sclerosis after immunization with DNA encoding myelin basic protein in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase 1/2 trial
    Amit Bar-Or
    Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Arch Neurol 64:1407-15. 2007
    ..To assess safety and immune modulation by BHT-3009, a tolerizing DNA vaccine encoding full-length human myelin basic protein, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)...
  59. doi request reprint Scalable signaling mediated by T cell antigen receptor-CD3 ITAMs ensures effective negative selection and prevents autoimmunity
    Jeff Holst
    Department of Immunology, St Jude Children s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 2794, USA
    Nat Immunol 9:658-66. 2008
    ..Thus, high ITAM number provides scalable signaling that can modulate proliferation yet ensure effective negative selection and prevention of autoimmunity...
  60. doi request reprint Phase 2 trial of a DNA vaccine encoding myelin basic protein for multiple sclerosis
    Hideki Garren
    Bayhill Therapeutics, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA
    Ann Neurol 63:611-20. 2008
    ..To evaluate the efficacy and safety of BHT-3009 in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and to confirm that BHT-3009 causes immune tolerance...

Research Grants10

  1. Multiplex Autoantibody Profiling in SLE
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Moreover, further development of protein microarray technology will have broad applications to the fields of immunology, functional genomics, and proteomics. ..
  2. Multiplex Autoantibody Profiling in SLE
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Moreover, further development of protein microarray technology will have broad applications to the fields of immunology, functional genomics, and proteomics. ..
  3. Lysate Arrays for Studying the Diabetes Proteome
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Our long term goal is to use the same approach for studying blood cells derived from human diabetic patients, hopefully allowing us to categorize patients and to define novel patient-specific or target-specific therapeutic modalities. ..
  4. Multiplex Autoantibody Profiling in SLE
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Moreover, further development of protein microarray technology will have broad applications to the fields of immunology, functional genomics, and proteomics. ..
  5. Autoantigen Arrays to Select Vaccines for Model of PBC
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Successful treatment of EAC using plasmids encoding prominent autoantigens may herald an era of customized, antigen- or tissue- specific tolerizing therapy in humans. ..
  6. PHOSPHORYLATION OF LUPUS AUTOANTIGENS IN APOPTOSIS
    PAUL UTZ; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ....