J A Theriot

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The polymerization motor
    J A Theriot
    Department of Biochemistry and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Traffic 1:19-28. 2000
  2. pmc A hitchhiker's guide to cell biology: exploitation of host-cell functions by intracellular pathogens
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Genome Biol 3:REPORTS4006. 2002
  3. pmc Bacterial shape and ActA distribution affect initiation of Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5307, USA
    Biophys J 89:2146-58. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint The making of a gradient: IcsA (VirG) polarity in Shigella flexneri
    J R Robbins
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 279 West Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA
    Mol Microbiol 41:861-72. 2001
  5. ncbi request reprint Crawling toward a unified model of cell mobility: spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Biochem 73:209-39. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint A correlation-based approach to calculate rotation and translation of moving cells
    Cyrus A Wilson
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Image Process 15:1939-51. 2006
  7. pmc Direct measurement of force generation by actin filament polymerization using an optical trap
    Matthew J Footer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:2181-6. 2007
  8. pmc Close packing of Listeria monocytogenes ActA, a natively unfolded protein, enhances F-actin assembly without dimerization
    Matthew J Footer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:23852-62. 2008
  9. pmc Biophysical parameters influence actin-based movement, trajectory, and initiation in a cell-free system
    Lisa A Cameron
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:2312-23. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Listeria monocytogenes rotates around its long axis during actin-based motility
    Jennifer R Robbins
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R754-6. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi request reprint The polymerization motor
    J A Theriot
    Department of Biochemistry and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Traffic 1:19-28. 2000
    ....
  2. pmc A hitchhiker's guide to cell biology: exploitation of host-cell functions by intracellular pathogens
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Genome Biol 3:REPORTS4006. 2002
    ..A report on the 'Pathogen-host cell interactions' minisymposium at the 41st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology, Washington DC, USA, 8-12 December 2001...
  3. pmc Bacterial shape and ActA distribution affect initiation of Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5307, USA
    Biophys J 89:2146-58. 2005
    ..Over time, saltatory motility and sensitivity to the immediate environment decreased as bacterial movement became robust at a constant steady-state speed...
  4. ncbi request reprint The making of a gradient: IcsA (VirG) polarity in Shigella flexneri
    J R Robbins
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 279 West Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA
    Mol Microbiol 41:861-72. 2001
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Crawling toward a unified model of cell mobility: spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Biochem 73:209-39. 2004
    ..This review attempts to codify some unifying principles for cell motility that span organizational scales from single protein polymer filaments to whole crawling cells...
  6. ncbi request reprint A correlation-based approach to calculate rotation and translation of moving cells
    Cyrus A Wilson
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Image Process 15:1939-51. 2006
    ..We describe our modifications enabling application to nonidentical images from video sequences of moving cells, and compare this method's performance with that of a feature extraction method and an iterative optimization method...
  7. pmc Direct measurement of force generation by actin filament polymerization using an optical trap
    Matthew J Footer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:2181-6. 2007
    ....
  8. pmc Close packing of Listeria monocytogenes ActA, a natively unfolded protein, enhances F-actin assembly without dimerization
    Matthew J Footer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:23852-62. 2008
    ....
  9. pmc Biophysical parameters influence actin-based movement, trajectory, and initiation in a cell-free system
    Lisa A Cameron
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:2312-23. 2004
    ..Neither mode was sufficient to enable spherical particles to break symmetry in the cytoplasm of living cells...
  10. ncbi request reprint Listeria monocytogenes rotates around its long axis during actin-based motility
    Jennifer R Robbins
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R754-6. 2003
  11. pmc Intracellular fluid flow in rapidly moving cells
    Kinneret Keren
    Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 11:1219-24. 2009
    ..We present a physical model for fluid pressure and flow in moving cells that quantitatively accounts for our experimental data...
  12. pmc Effects of intermediate filaments on actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes
    P A Giardini
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biophys J 81:3193-203. 2001
    ..Taken together, these results suggest that a network of intermediate filaments constrains bacterial movement and operates over distances of several microns to reduce fluctuations in motile behavior...
  13. ncbi request reprint Actin-based motility is sufficient for bacterial membrane protrusion formation and host cell uptake
    D M Monack
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 279 West Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA
    Cell Microbiol 3:633-47. 2001
    ..The frequency of membrane protrusion formation across all strains tested correlates with the efficiency of unidirectional actin-based movement, but not with bacterial speed...
  14. pmc Actin-myosin network reorganization breaks symmetry at the cell rear to spontaneously initiate polarized cell motility
    Patricia T Yam
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cell Biol 178:1207-21. 2007
    ..Together, these results indicate that large-scale actin-myosin network reorganization and contractility at the cell rear initiate spontaneous symmetry breaking and polarized motility of keratocytes...
  15. pmc A gene-expression program reflecting the innate immune response of cultured intestinal epithelial cells to infection by Listeria monocytogenes
    David N Baldwin
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center, 279 West Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 4:R2. 2003
    ..The first line of host defense, however, is the intestinal epithelium...
  16. pmc Mechanism of polarization of Listeria monocytogenes surface protein ActA
    Susanne M Rafelski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, 279 W Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Mol Microbiol 59:1262-79. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Dendritic organization of actin comet tails
    L A Cameron
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 11:130-5. 2001
    ..However, comet tails differ from lamellipodia in that their actin filaments are usually twisted and appear to be under significant torsional stress...
  18. pmc Emergence of large-scale cell morphology and movement from local actin filament growth dynamics
    Catherine I Lacayo
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e233. 2007
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Decoupling the coupling: surface attachment in actin-based motility
    Mark A Tsuchida
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 2:221-4. 2007
    ..The surprising details of the biochemical mechanism necessitate reconsideration of the biophysical models proposed for actin-based motility...
  20. pmc Bipedal locomotion in crawling cells
    Erin L Barnhart
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Biophys J 98:933-42. 2010
    ..These results demonstrate that simple elastic coupling between movement at the front of the cell and movement at the rear can generate large-scale mechanical integration of cell behavior...
  21. pmc Myosin II contributes to cell-scale actin network treadmilling through network disassembly
    Cyrus A Wilson
    Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 465:373-7. 2010
    ....
  22. pmc Repeated cycles of rapid actin assembly and disassembly on epithelial cell phagosomes
    Patricia T Yam
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford CA 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:5647-58. 2004
    ..This suggests that flashing occurs downstream of several distinct molecular entry mechanisms and may be a general consequence of internalization of large objects by epithelial cells...
  23. pmc Compression forces generated by actin comet tails on lipid vesicles
    Paula A Giardini
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:6493-8. 2003
    ....
  24. pmc Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility varies depending on subcellular location: a kinematic probe for cytoarchitecture
    Catherine I Lacayo
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:2164-75. 2004
    ..Our results show that subcellular domains along with microtubule depolymerization may influence the actin cytoskeleton to affect L. monocytogenes speed, speed persistence, and trajectory curvature...
  25. pmc Bacteria make tracks to the pole
    Aretha Fiebig
    Department of Biochemistry and of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:8510-1. 2004
  26. pmc Two independent spiral structures control cell shape in Caulobacter
    Natalie A Dye
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18608-13. 2005
    ....
  27. pmc Fine-scale time-lapse analysis of the biphasic, dynamic behaviour of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes
    Aretha Fiebig
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center, 279 W Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 95305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 60:1164-78. 2006
    ..Thus the actual position of oriC(II) varies with cell length. While the gross behaviours of the two origins are distinct, their fine-scale dynamics are remarkably similar, indicating that both experience similar microenvironments...
  28. ncbi request reprint Influences of thermal acclimation and acute temperature change on the motility of epithelial wound-healing cells (keratocytes) of tropical, temperate and Antarctic fish
    Rachael A Ream
    Biochemistry Department, Beckman Center, Room 473A, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    J Exp Biol 206:4539-51. 2003
    ..Keratocytes represent a useful study system for evaluating the effects of temperature at the cellular level and for studying adaptive variation in actin-based cellular movement and capacity for wound healing...
  29. ncbi request reprint High affinity, paralog-specific recognition of the Mena EVH1 domain by a miniature protein
    Dasantila Golemi-Kotra
    Departments of Chemistry and Molecular, Cellular, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 126:4-5. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that miniature proteins based on aPP may represent an excellent framework for the design of ligands that differentiate the roles of EVH1 domains in vitro and in vivo...
  30. ncbi request reprint Loading history determines the velocity of actin-network growth
    Sapun H Parekh
    UCSF UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 7:1219-23. 2005
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Ena/VASP proteins contribute to Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis by controlling temporal and spatial persistence of bacterial actin-based motility
    Victoria Auerbuch
    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Mol Microbiol 49:1361-75. 2003
    ..Lastly, we showed the pathogenic relevance of these findings by the observation that L. monocytogenes lacking ActA Ena/VASP-binding sites were up to 400-fold less virulent during an adaptive immune response...
  32. pmc Large-scale quantitative analysis of sources of variation in the actin polymerization-based movement of Listeria monocytogenes
    Frederick S Soo
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Biophys J 89:703-23. 2005
    ....
  33. pmc Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells
    Kinneret Keren
    Department of Biochemistry, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel
    Nature 453:475-80. 2008
    ..Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells...
  34. pmc Differential force microscope for long time-scale biophysical measurements
    Jason L Choy
    Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Rev Sci Instrum 78:043711. 2007
    ....
  35. pmc Listeria monocytogenes traffics from maternal organs to the placenta and back
    Anna I Bakardjiev
    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA
    PLoS Pathog 2:e66. 2006
    ..Once colonized, the placenta becomes a nidus of infection resulting in massive reseeding of maternal organs, where L. monocytogenes cannot be cleared until trafficking is interrupted by expulsion of the infected placental tissues...
  36. ncbi request reprint An introduction to cell motility for the physical scientist
    Daniel A Fletcher
    Department of Bioengineering and Biophysics Program, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Phys Biol 1:T1-10. 2004
    ..This tutorial, aimed at readers with a background in physical sciences, surveys the state of current knowledge and recent advances in modeling cell motility...
  37. pmc Adhesion controls bacterial actin polymerization-based movement
    Frederick S Soo
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:16233-8. 2005
    ..The idea that speed depends on adhesion, rather than polymerization, suggests several alternative mechanisms by which known cytoskeletal regulatory proteins could control cellular movement...