C A Taylor

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular mechanics
    C A Taylor
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:109-34. 2009
  2. ncbi request reprint In vivo quantification of blood flow and wall shear stress in the human abdominal aorta during lower limb exercise
    Charles A Taylor
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:402-8. 2002
  3. doi request reprint Image-based modeling of blood flow and vessel wall dynamics: applications, methods and future directions: Sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop, March 28-30, 2008 Pasadena, California
    Charles A Taylor
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 38:1188-203. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint A one-dimensional finite element method for simulation-based medical planning for cardiovascular disease
    Jing Wan
    Department of Petroleum Engineering, Durand 213, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3030, USA
    Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 5:195-206. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo validation of numerical prediction of blood flow in arterial bypass grafts
    Joy P Ku
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CA 94305 3030, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:743-52. 2002
  6. pmc Preliminary 3D computational analysis of the relationship between aortic displacement force and direction of endograft movement
    C Alberto Figueroa
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vasc Surg 51:1488-97; discussion 1497. 2010
  7. pmc Magnitude and direction of pulsatile displacement forces acting on thoracic aortic endografts
    C Alberto Figueroa
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:350-8. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Comparison of CFD and MRI flow and velocities in an in vitro large artery bypass graft model
    Joy P Ku
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 33:257-69. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Aortoiliac hemodynamic and morphologic adaptation to chronic spinal cord injury
    Janice J Yeung
    Department of Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    J Vasc Surg 44:1254-1265. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Quantification of wall shear stress in large blood vessels using Lagrangian interpolation functions with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:1020-32. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications60

  1. doi request reprint Patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular mechanics
    C A Taylor
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:109-34. 2009
    ..Applications of patient-specific models of cardiovascular mechanics are presented, followed by a discussion of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead...
  2. ncbi request reprint In vivo quantification of blood flow and wall shear stress in the human abdominal aorta during lower limb exercise
    Charles A Taylor
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:402-8. 2002
    ..5 +/- 0.8 dyn/cm2 at rest to 6.2 +/- 0.5 dyn/cm2 during exercise (p<0.0005) and increased in the infrarenal aorta from 1.3 +/- 0.8 dyn/cm2 at rest to 5.2 +/- 1.3 dyn/cm2 during exercise (p<0.0005)...
  3. doi request reprint Image-based modeling of blood flow and vessel wall dynamics: applications, methods and future directions: Sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop, March 28-30, 2008 Pasadena, California
    Charles A Taylor
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 38:1188-203. 2010
    ..We believe that with a doubling of our efforts toward the clinical application of image-based modeling tools, the next few years could surpass the tremendous gains made in the last few...
  4. ncbi request reprint A one-dimensional finite element method for simulation-based medical planning for cardiovascular disease
    Jing Wan
    Department of Petroleum Engineering, Durand 213, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3030, USA
    Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 5:195-206. 2002
    ..All of these solutions were obtained in less than 5 min of computation time on a personal computer...
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo validation of numerical prediction of blood flow in arterial bypass grafts
    Joy P Ku
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CA 94305 3030, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:743-52. 2002
    ..6% of the experimental data. The average absolute difference in the bypass-to-inlet blood flow ratio was 5.4 +/- 2.8%. For the aorta-to-inlet blood flow ratio, the average absolute difference was 6.0 +/- 3.3%...
  6. pmc Preliminary 3D computational analysis of the relationship between aortic displacement force and direction of endograft movement
    C Alberto Figueroa
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Vasc Surg 51:1488-97; discussion 1497. 2010
    ..The purpose of this study is to determine whether the direction of aortic endograft movement as observed in follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans is related to the directional displacement force acting on the endograft...
  7. pmc Magnitude and direction of pulsatile displacement forces acting on thoracic aortic endografts
    C Alberto Figueroa
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:350-8. 2009
    ..To assess 3-dimensional (3D) pulsatile displacement forces (DF) acting on thoracic endografts using 3D computational techniques...
  8. ncbi request reprint Comparison of CFD and MRI flow and velocities in an in vitro large artery bypass graft model
    Joy P Ku
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 33:257-69. 2005
    ..The in-plane velocities also agreed reasonably well at most locations...
  9. ncbi request reprint Aortoiliac hemodynamic and morphologic adaptation to chronic spinal cord injury
    Janice J Yeung
    Department of Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    J Vasc Surg 44:1254-1265. 2006
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Quantification of wall shear stress in large blood vessels using Lagrangian interpolation functions with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:1020-32. 2002
    ..We quantified the shear stress at the supraceliac and infrarenal regions of a human abdominal aorta to be 3.4 and 2.3 dyn/cm2, respectively...
  11. ncbi request reprint Quantification of vessel wall cyclic strain using cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging
    Mary T Draney
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:1033-45. 2002
    ..Results demonstrated nonuniform deformation and circumferential variation in cyclic strain, with a peak average strain of 0.08 +/- 0.11...
  12. pmc Effect of curvature on displacement forces acting on aortic endografts: a 3-dimensional computational analysis
    C Alberto Figueroa
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:284-94. 2009
    ..To determine the effect of curvature on the magnitude and direction of displacement forces acting on aortic endografts in 3-dimensional (3D) computational models...
  13. ncbi request reprint Increased anterior abdominal aortic wall motion: possible role in aneurysm pathogenesis and design of endovascular devices
    Craig J Goergen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, CA 94305 5431, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 14:574-84. 2007
    ..To determine whether variations in aortic wall motion exist in mammalian species other than humans and to consider the potential implications of such variations...
  14. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamics in young healthy adults at rest and during lower limb exercise: quantification using image-based computer modeling
    Beverly T Tang
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291:H668-76. 2006
    ....
  15. pmc Circumferential and longitudinal cyclic strain of the human thoracic aorta: age-related changes
    Tina M Morrison
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif, USA
    J Vasc Surg 49:1029-36. 2009
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Quantification of hemodynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics
    Andrea S Les
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 38:1288-313. 2010
    ..We postulate that the increased MWSS, decreased OSI, and moderate turbulence present during exercise may attenuate AAA growth...
  17. ncbi request reprint Finite element modeling of three-dimensional pulsatile flow in the abdominal aorta: relevance to atherosclerosis
    C A Taylor
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 26:975-87. 1998
    ..Monogr. Atheroscler. 15:13-19, 1990). This numerical investigation provides detailed quantitative data on hemodynamic conditions in the abdominal aorta heretofore lacking in the study of the localization of atherosclerotic disease...
  18. ncbi request reprint Predictive medicine: computational techniques in therapeutic decision-making
    C A Taylor
    Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Comput Aided Surg 4:231-47. 1999
    ..This system is applied to the evaluation of alternate, patient-specific treatments for a case of lower extremity occlusive cardiovascular disease...
  19. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamic conditions in healthy subjects aged 50-70 at rest and during lower limb exercise: in vivo quantification using MRI
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Standford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Atherosclerosis 168:323-31. 2003
    ..6+/-2.2 years). Compared to the younger subjects, the older subjects also experienced greater increases in mean wall shear stress and greater decreases in wall shear stress oscillations from rest to exercise...
  20. doi request reprint On coupling a lumped parameter heart model and a three-dimensional finite element aorta model
    H J Kim
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 18 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 37:2153-69. 2009
    ..We demonstrate this method in a patient-specific model of a normal human thoracic aorta under rest and exercise conditions and an aortic coarctation model under pre- and post-interventions...
  21. doi request reprint Characterization of coherent structures in the cardiovascular system
    Shawn C Shadden
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 36:1152-62. 2008
    ..This perspective allows valuable understanding of flow features in large vessels beyond methods traditionally considered...
  22. doi request reprint New insights into pacemaker lead-induced venous occlusion: simulation-based investigation of alterations in venous biomechanics
    Anna Lonyai
    School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Cardiovasc Eng 10:84-90. 2010
    ..This methodology may add to our understanding of the development of lead-induced thrombosis and occlusion in the clinical arena, and enable the development of new strategies to avoid such complications...
  23. ncbi request reprint Inferior vena caval hemodynamics quantified in vivo at rest and during cycling exercise using magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 3030, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284:H1161-7. 2003
    ..The hemodynamic and anatomic data of the IVC acquired in this study add to our understanding of the venous circulation and may be useful in a clinical setting...
  24. ncbi request reprint Measurement of vessel wall strain using cine phase contrast MRI
    Kristin L Wedding
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 15:418-28. 2002
    ..To determine the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively measure strain in the aortic wall...
  25. ncbi request reprint Allometric scaling of wall shear stress from mice to humans: quantification using cine phase-contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics
    Joan M Greve
    Clark Center, E350, 318 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291:H1700-8. 2006
    ..This noninvasive methodology provides the opportunity to serially quantify changes in WSS during disease progression and/or therapeutic intervention...
  26. doi request reprint Three-dimensional simulations in Glenn patients: clinically based boundary conditions, hemodynamic results and sensitivity to input data
    G Troianowski
    Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biomech Eng 133:111006. 2011
    ..This study constitutes a first step towards understanding the hemodynamic differences between pre- and post Fontan surgery, predicting these differences, and evaluating surgical outcomes based on preoperative data...
  27. ncbi request reprint In vivo MR angiographic quantification of axial and twisting deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from maximum hip and knee flexion
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 17:979-87. 2006
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Internet-based system for simulation-based medical planning for cardiovascular disease
    Brooke N Steele
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94035, USA
    IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed 7:123-9. 2003
    ..We describe a simulation-based medical planning environment developed for the World Wide Web (WWW) using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and the Java programming language...
  29. ncbi request reprint In vivo validation of a one-dimensional finite-element method for predicting blood flow in cardiovascular bypass grafts
    Brooke N Steele
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Room P224, Stanford, CA 94305 5464, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 50:649-56. 2003
    ..2% with the maximum difference of 10.6% anda minimum difference of 0.4%. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the flow rate and distribution with respect to stenosis and branch losses were quantified...
  30. pmc In vivo deformation of the human abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries with hip and knee flexion: implications for the design of stent-grafts
    Gilwoo Choi
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:531-8. 2009
    ..To quantify in vivo deformations of the abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries (CIAs) caused by musculoskeletal motion...
  31. ncbi request reprint Time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI
    Michael Markl
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 17:499-506. 2003
    ....
  32. pmc The effect of aging on deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from hip and knee flexion: potential clinical implications
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Clark Center, Room E350, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 21:195-202. 2010
    ..The purpose of this study is to describe geometric changes of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) resulting from hip and knee flexion in older subjects...
  33. ncbi request reprint Dynamic exercise imaging with an MR-compatible stationary cycle within the general electric open magnet
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California, USA
    Magn Reson Med 49:581-5. 2003
    ..An exercise workload of 47.9 W was achieved. His heart rate increased from 52 to 78 bpm, supraceliac flow increased from 1.7 to 3.7 L/min, and infrarenal flow increased from 0.4 to 3.2 L/min from rest to exercise...
  34. ncbi request reprint Morphometry-based impedance boundary conditions for patient-specific modeling of blood flow in pulmonary arteries
    Ryan L Spilker
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Clark Center E350B, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 35:546-59. 2007
    ..This method of coupling image-based and morphometry-based models could enable increased fidelity in pulmonary hemodynamic simulation...
  35. doi request reprint Power law as a method for ultrasound detection of internal bleeding: in vivo rabbit validation
    Aaron S Wang
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 57:2870-5. 2010
    ..95 for bleed rates 20% and higher. Thus, FSD was a good indicator of bleed severity and may serve as an additional tool in the US bleed detection...
  36. ncbi request reprint Physics-based modeling of aortic wall motion from ECG-gated 4D computed tomography
    Guanglei Xiong
    Biomedical Informatics Program, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv 13:426-34. 2010
    ..We evaluated the performance of our method on synthetic data where ground-truths are available. Finally, we successfully applied the method to a real data set...
  37. ncbi request reprint Virtual stent grafting in personalized surgical planning for treatment of aortic aneurysms using image-based computational fluid dynamics
    Guanglei Xiong
    Biomedical Informatics Program, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv 13:375-82. 2010
    ..Our approach enables prospective model construction and may help to increase its throughput required by routine clinical uses in the future...
  38. pmc In vivo quantification of murine aortic cyclic strain, motion, and curvature: implications for abdominal aortic aneurysm growth
    Craig J Goergen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 32:847-58. 2010
    ..To develop methods to quantify cyclic strain, motion, and curvature of the murine abdominal aorta in vivo...
  39. pmc Induced chromosome deletion in a Williams-Beuren syndrome mouse model causes cardiovascular abnormalities
    Craig J Goergen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    J Vasc Res 48:119-29. 2011
    ..5-Mb deletion. The aim of this study was to determine how the genetic changes in a Wbs mouse model alter Eln expression, blood pressure, vessel structure, and abdominal aortic wall dynamics in vivo...
  40. pmc Influences of aortic motion and curvature on vessel expansion in murine experimental aneurysms
    Craig J Goergen
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 318 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31:270-9. 2011
    ..To quantitatively compare aortic curvature and motion with resulting aneurysm location, direction of expansion, and pathophysiological features in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)...
  41. ncbi request reprint Blood flow conditions in the proximal pulmonary arteries and vena cavae: healthy children during upright cycling exercise
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287:H921-6. 2004
    ..During seated rest, the SVC-to-IVC venous return ratio is 50/50%. With light/moderate cycling exercise, IVC flow increases by threefold, whereas SVC remains essentially constant...
  42. ncbi request reprint Quantification of vessel wall motion and cyclic strain using cine phase contrast MRI: in vivo validation in the porcine aorta
    Mary T Draney
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    Magn Reson Med 52:286-95. 2004
    ..6%. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to accurately quantify strain from low wall velocities in vivo and that the porcine thoracic aorta does not deform uniformly...
  43. ncbi request reprint Predicting changes in blood flow in patient-specific operative plans for treating aortoiliac occlusive disease
    Nathan M Wilson
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    Comput Aided Surg 10:257-77. 2005
    ....
  44. ncbi request reprint Effects of exercise and respiration on hemodynamic efficiency in CFD simulations of the total cavopulmonary connection
    Alison L Marsden
    Pediatrics Department, Stanford University, Clark Center E350, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 35:250-63. 2007
    ..We propose that respiration and exercise should be incorporated into TCPC CFD simulations to provide increasingly realistic evaluations of TCPC performance...
  45. ncbi request reprint AAA disease: mechanism, stratification, and treatment
    Ronald L Dalman
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305 5642, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1085:92-109. 2006
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint Three-dimensional analysis of renal artery bending motion during respiration
    Mary T Draney
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 12:380-6. 2005
    ..To evaluate displacement and bending of the renal arteries during respiration...
  47. doi request reprint Multiscale vascular surface model generation from medical imaging data using hierarchical features
    Eric J Bekkers
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Med Imaging 27:331-41. 2008
    ....
  48. doi request reprint Estimation of central aortic forces in the ballistocardiogram under rest and exercise conditions
    Richard M Wiard
    Bioengineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:2831-4. 2009
    ..The increased pulse pressure in an exercise simulation caused a significant increase in CAF, which is consistent with recent BCG measurements in exercise recovery...
  49. doi request reprint Drug transport in artery walls: a sequential porohyperelastic-transport approach
    Peter H Feenstra
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, USA
    Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 12:263-76. 2009
    ..The results of the drug release simulation for a period of one week show that the drug distributes longitudinally but will remain in the proximity of the stented area...
  50. doi request reprint Endovascular device design in the future: transformation from trial and error to computational design
    Christopher K Zarins
    Stanford University School of Medicine and School of Engineering, Stanford, California, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:I12-21. 2009
    ..Utilization of computational design methodology that takes into consideration the physiology of the cardiovascular system will improve future endovascular devices so that they are safer and more effective and durable...
  51. ncbi request reprint Proximal pulmonary artery blood flow characteristics in healthy subjects measured in an upright posture using MRI: the effects of exercise and age
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 21:752-8. 2005
    ..To use MRI to quantify blood flow conditions in the proximal pulmonary arteries of healthy children and adults at rest and during exercise in an upright posture...
  52. doi request reprint Methods for quantifying three-dimensional deformation of arteries due to pulsatile and nonpulsatile forces: implications for the design of stents and stent grafts
    Gilwoo Choi
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 37:14-33. 2009
    ..The proposed methods may aid in designing preclinical tests aimed at replicating dynamic in vivo conditions in the arterial tree for the purpose of developing more durable endovascular devices including stents and stent grafts...
  53. pmc Quantifying in vivo hemodynamic response to exercise in patients with intermittent claudication and abdominal aortic aneurysms using cine phase-contrast MRI
    Adam S Tenforde
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 31:425-9. 2010
    ..To evaluate rest and exercise hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and peripheral occlusive disease (claudicants) using phase-contrast MRI...
  54. ncbi request reprint Comparison of abdominal aortic hemodynamics between men and women at rest and during lower limb exercise
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Vasc Surg 37:118-23. 2003
    ..However, the hemodynamics of men and women have not been compared at this location at rest or during lower limb exercise conditions...
  55. ncbi request reprint Simulation-based medical planning for cardiovascular disease: visualization system foundations
    S A Spicer
    Division of Vascular Surgery, Stanford University, CA 94305 5642, USA
    Comput Aided Surg 5:82-9. 2000
    ..These models were later embedded into patient-specific diagnostic MRA scans to establish the anatomic context for physiologic observations...
  56. pmc The three-dimensional micro- and nanostructure of the aortic medial lamellar unit measured using 3D confocal and electron microscopy imaging
    Mary K O'Connell
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Matrix Biol 27:171-81. 2008
    ..This high resolution three-dimensional view of the aortic media reveals MLU microstructure details that suggest a highly complex and integrated mural organization that correlates with aortic mechanical properties...
  57. doi request reprint Tuning multidomain hemodynamic simulations to match physiological measurements
    Ryan L Spilker
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 38:2635-48. 2010
    ..This approach enables efficient development of cardiovascular models for applications including detailed evaluation of cardiovascular mechanics, simulation-based design of medical devices, and patient-specific treatment planning...
  58. ncbi request reprint Increased aortic stiffness in the insulin-resistant Zucker fa/fa rat
    Akhilesh K Sista
    Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Dept of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 289:H845-51. 2005
    ..Thus there is mechanical, structural, and molecular evidence of arteriosclerosis in the Zucker fa/fa rat at the glucose-intolerant, hyperinsulinemic stage...
  59. doi request reprint Fractal network model for simulating abdominal and lower extremity blood flow during resting and exercise conditions
    Brooke N Steele
    Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, NC State University and UNC Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 7115, USA
    Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 10:39-51. 2007
    ..0 +/- 15 cm(3) s(- 1) at exercise. While future work will improve on these results, this method provides groundwork with which to predict the flow distributions in a network due to physiologic regulation...
  60. ncbi request reprint Flow imaging and computing: large artery hemodynamics
    David A Steinman
    Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
    Ann Biomed Eng 33:1704-9. 2005
    ....