THOMAS C contact SUDHOF

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Generation of induced neuronal cells by the single reprogramming factor ASCL1
    Soham Chanda
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Stem Cell Reports 3:282-96. 2014
  2. pmc Munc18-1 binding to the neuronal SNARE complex controls synaptic vesicle priming
    Ferenc Deak
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    J Cell Biol 184:751-64. 2009
  3. pmc Synaptotagmin-1 functions as a Ca2+ sensor for spontaneous release
    Jun Xu
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Nat Neurosci 12:759-66. 2009
  4. pmc Neurotransmitter release: the last millisecond in the life of a synaptic vesicle
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Lorry Lokey SIM1 Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Neuron 80:675-90. 2013
  5. pmc The presynaptic active zone
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304 5453, USA
    Neuron 75:11-25. 2012
  6. pmc Calcium control of neurotransmitter release
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 4:a011353. 2012
  7. pmc Neuroligins and neurexins link synaptic function to cognitive disease
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Neuroscience Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 1050 Arastradero Road B249, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nature 455:903-11. 2008
  8. pmc Membrane fusion: grappling with SNARE and SM proteins
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Science 323:474-7. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Generation of induced neuronal cells by the single reprogramming factor ASCL1
    Soham Chanda
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Stem Cell Reports 3:282-96. 2014
    ..Surprisingly, ASCL1-induced iN cells were predominantly excitatory, demonstrating that ASCL1 is permissive but alone not deterministic for the inhibitory neuronal lineage. ..
  2. pmc Munc18-1 binding to the neuronal SNARE complex controls synaptic vesicle priming
    Ferenc Deak
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    J Cell Biol 184:751-64. 2009
    ....
  3. pmc Synaptotagmin-1 functions as a Ca2+ sensor for spontaneous release
    Jun Xu
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Nat Neurosci 12:759-66. 2009
    ..These data suggest that Syt1 controls both evoked and spontaneous release at a synapse as a simultaneous Ca2+-dependent activator and clamp of exocytosis...
  4. pmc Neurotransmitter release: the last millisecond in the life of a synaptic vesicle
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Lorry Lokey SIM1 Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Neuron 80:675-90. 2013
    ..This architecture allows direct flow of Ca(2+) ions from Ca(2+) channels to synaptotagmin, which then triggers fusion, thus mediating tight millisecond coupling of an action potential to neurotransmitter release. ..
  5. pmc The presynaptic active zone
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304 5453, USA
    Neuron 75:11-25. 2012
    ..Moreover, this complex mediates short- and long-term plasticity in response to bursts of action potentials, thus critically contributing to the computational power of a synapse...
  6. pmc Calcium control of neurotransmitter release
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 4:a011353. 2012
    ....
  7. pmc Neuroligins and neurexins link synaptic function to cognitive disease
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Neuroscience Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 1050 Arastradero Road B249, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nature 455:903-11. 2008
    ..In humans, alterations in genes encoding neurexins or neuroligins have recently been implicated in autism and other cognitive diseases, linking synaptic cell adhesion to cognition and its disorders...
  8. pmc Membrane fusion: grappling with SNARE and SM proteins
    Thomas C Sudhof
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Science 323:474-7. 2009
    ....