David A Spiegel

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Tranceformations: hypnosis in brain and body
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Depress Anxiety 30:342-52. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304 5718, USA
    Annu Rev Clin Psychol 9:299-326. 2013
  3. pmc Mind matters in cancer survival
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychooncology 21:588-93. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of psychotherapy on cancer survival
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    Nat Rev Cancer 2:383-9. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized prospective trial
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Cancer 110:1130-8. 2007
  6. pmc Stress sensitivity in metastatic breast cancer: analysis of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:1231-44. 2006
  7. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 28:824-52. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 28:E17-45. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint Sleep disturbances in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Breast J 8:362-70. 2002

Detail Information

Publications50

  1. doi request reprint Tranceformations: hypnosis in brain and body
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Depress Anxiety 30:342-52. 2013
    ..The evidence indicates an important role for hypnosis in managing anxiety disorders and anxiety related to medical illness...
  2. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304 5718, USA
    Annu Rev Clin Psychol 9:299-326. 2013
    ..Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity...
  3. pmc Mind matters in cancer survival
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychooncology 21:588-93. 2012
    ..The very name "psycho-oncology" implies interaction between brain and body. One of the most intriguing scientific questions for the field is whether or not living better may also mean living longer...
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of psychotherapy on cancer survival
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    Nat Rev Cancer 2:383-9. 2002
    ..Does emotional support affect the course of cancer? What physiological pathways might mediate such an effect? Given what we now know, should we change the standard of care for cancer patients?..
  5. ncbi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized prospective trial
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Cancer 110:1130-8. 2007
    ..Subsequent findings concerning the question of whether such psychosocial support affects survival have been mixed...
  6. pmc Stress sensitivity in metastatic breast cancer: analysis of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:1231-44. 2006
    ..21, p=.04, N=95). Our general findings suggest that flatter daytime cortisol slopes among metastatic breast cancer patients may be related to disrupted feedback inhibition rather than hypersensitivity in response to stimulation...
  7. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 28:824-52. 2011
    ..The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining diagnostic criteria...
  8. doi request reprint Dissociative disorders in DSM-5
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 28:E17-45. 2011
    ..The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining diagnostic criteria...
  9. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
    ..To examine whether a group intervention including hypnosis can reduce cancer pain and trait hypnotizability would moderate these effects...
  10. ncbi request reprint Sleep disturbances in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Breast J 8:362-70. 2002
    ..These results suggest that women with metastatic breast cancer who are at higher risk for having sleeping problems are those who are less educated, in pain, depressed, have bony metastases, or lack social support...
  11. pmc Circadian affective, cardiopulmonary, and cortisol variability in depressed and nondepressed individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 42:769-77. 2008
    ..Diurnal mood variations of older individuals at risk for CVD differ from those reported for other groups and daily fluctuations in NA are not related to cardiac autonomic control in depressed individuals...
  12. ncbi request reprint Living in the face of death: interviews with 12 terminally ill women on home hospice care
    Mareile M Grumann
    The Psychosocial Treatment Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Palliat Support Care 1:23-32. 2003
    ..To determine how home hospice patients deal with their impending death and whether there is a need for greater involvement of mental health professionals in the care of patients dying at home...
  13. ncbi request reprint Mood disturbance in community cancer support groups. The role of emotional suppression and fighting spirit
    Matthew J Cordova
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Psychosom Res 55:461-7. 2003
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Disengagement and social support moderate distress among women with a family history of breast cancer
    Julie M Turner-Cobb
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Breast J 12:7-15. 2006
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint The effect of peer counseling on quality of life following diagnosis of breast cancer: an observational study
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Psychooncology 15:1014-22. 2006
    ..Randomized clinical trials are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of peer navigator programs...
  16. doi request reprint Sexual violence, posttraumatic stress disorder, and the pelvic examination: how do beliefs about the safety, necessity, and utility of the examination influence patient experiences?
    Julie C Weitlauf
    Center for Health Care Evaluation, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94025, USA
    J Womens Health (Larchmt) 19:1271-80. 2010
    ..Efforts to more fully characterize these reactions and identify core factors (i.e., beliefs about the examination) that may influence these reactions are warranted...
  17. ncbi request reprint Emotional expression and diurnal cortisol slope in women with metastatic breast cancer in supportive-expressive group therapy: a preliminary study
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Biol Psychol 73:190-8. 2006
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Psychophysiological and cortisol responses to psychological stress in depressed and nondepressed older men and women with elevated cardiovascular disease risk
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5722, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:538-46. 2006
    ..The objective of this study was to compare psychophysiological and cortisol reactions to psychological stress in older depressed and nondepressed patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)...
  19. ncbi request reprint Effects of quality of life and coping on depression among adults living with HIV/AIDS
    Cheryl Gore-Felton
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Health Psychol 11:711-29. 2006
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Depression and stress reactivity in metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:675-83. 2006
    ..This study investigated how depression affects MBC stress reactivity, including autonomic (ANS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function...
  21. pmc Hypnotizability, posttraumatic stress, and depressive symptoms in metastatic breast cancer
    Alex S Keuroghlian
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Int J Clin Exp Hypn 58:39-52. 2010
    ..The authors relate these results to findings in other clinical populations and discuss implications for the psychosocial treatment of metastatic breast cancer...
  22. pmc Regional brain activation during verbal declarative memory in metastatic breast cancer
    Shelli R Kesler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5795, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 15:6665-73. 2009
    ..We attempted to determine if verbal memory impairments were related to the most commonly studied disease parameters including adjuvant chemotherapy and chronic stress-related disruption of limbic system structures...
  23. ncbi request reprint Commentary: Reversing amnesia about hypnosis
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Am J Clin Hypn 49:181-2. 2007
  24. pmc Does improving mood in depressed patients alter factors that may affect cardiovascular disease risk?
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, 401 Quarry Rd, Room 1316, Stanford, CA 94305 5722, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 43:1246-52. 2009
    ..The normal controls exhibited no change in the variables measured during the same time. A significant improvement in mood may have little impact on most traditional or atypical risk factors, cortisol or cardiophysiology...
  25. doi request reprint Meditation with yoga, group therapy with hypnosis, and psychoeducation for long-term depressed mood: a randomized pilot trial
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 571, USA
    J Clin Psychol 64:806-20. 2008
    ..Although all groups reported some reduction in symptom levels, they did not differ significantly in that outcome. Overall, these results suggest that these two interventions show promise for treating low- to moderate-level depression...
  26. ncbi request reprint Social support and maladaptive coping as predictors of the change in physical health symptoms among persons living with HIV/AIDS
    Eric Ashton
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    AIDS Patient Care STDS 19:587-98. 2005
    ..These findings provide further evidence that social support can buffer deleterious health outcomes among individuals with a chronic illness. Future research needs to examine mediating pathways that can explain this relationship...
  27. ncbi request reprint Acute stress reactions to recent life events among women and men living with HIV/AIDS
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    Int J Psychiatry Med 32:361-78. 2002
    ..A second aim was to investigate the relationship of acute stress reactions among HIV-infected men and women to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to previous traumatic life events...
  28. ncbi request reprint Psychological distress and pain significantly increase before death in metastatic breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    Psychosom Med 65:416-26. 2003
    ..It was hypothesized that psychological distress would increase significantly before death independent of changes in pain...
  29. ncbi request reprint Acute stress reactions following the assassination of Mexican presidential candidate Colosio
    Jose R Maldonado
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 15:401-5. 2002
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint HIV: effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine
    Rachel Power
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Prim Care 29:361-78. 2002
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Mesmer minus magic: hypnosis and modern medicine
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    Int J Clin Exp Hypn 50:397-406. 2002
    ..Both hypnosis and medicine ultimately benefited...
  32. ncbi request reprint Comorbidity of depression with other medical diseases in the elderly
    K Ranga R Krishnan
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 52:559-88. 2002
    ..This review focuses exclusively on unipolar disorder. The review summarizes the current state of the art and also makes recommendations for future directions...
  33. ncbi request reprint Psychosocial intervention for lesbians with primary breast cancer
    Pat Fobair
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 11:427-38. 2002
    ..There were no changes in body image, sexuality, or attitudes toward health-care providers. These results suggest that Supportive/Expressive group intervention appears to be helpful for lesbians with breast cancer...
  34. ncbi request reprint Traumatic stress symptoms among women with recently diagnosed primary breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 15:277-87. 2002
    ..Furthermore, these results suggest women at greatest risk are those who are younger, who receive postsurgical cancer treatment, who are low in emotional self-efficacy and whose lives are most affected by having cancer...
  35. ncbi request reprint Change in emotion-regulation strategy for women with metastatic breast cancer following supportive-expressive group therapy
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 70:916-25. 2002
    ..Even though these aspects of emotion-regulation appear trait-like within the control group, significant change was observed with treatment...
  36. ncbi request reprint Social support, substance use, and denial in relationship to antiretroviral treatment adherence among HIV-infected persons
    Rachel Power
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    AIDS Patient Care STDS 17:245-52. 2003
    ..Furthermore, couple-based approaches enlisting partner support may help persons living with HIV to adhere to antiretroviral regimens...
  37. ncbi request reprint Anticipating loss and other temporal stressors predict traumatic stress symptoms among partners of metastatic/recurrent breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Room 2320, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 14:492-502. 2005
    ..Limitations and treatment implications of the present research and directions for future research are discussed...
  38. ncbi request reprint Negative and positive visual hypnotic hallucinations: attending inside and out
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    Int J Clin Exp Hypn 51:130-46. 2003
    ..Positive obstructive hallucinations seem to allow for a hypnotic focus inward, activating the functioning of attentional neural systems and reducing perceptual ones...
  39. ncbi request reprint Treatment of acute traumatic stress reactions
    David Spiegel
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Dissociation 6:101-8. 2005
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint Cancer supportive care, improving the quality of life for cancer patients. A program evaluation report
    Ernest Rosenbaum
    Stanford Cancer Supportive Care Program, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 1101 Welch Road, Bldg A, Ste 6, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Support Care Cancer 12:293-301. 2004
    ..The Stanford Cancer Supportive Care Program was initiated in 1999 to provide support for cancer patients, addressing the need for improved physical and emotional well-being and quality of life. This paper is a program evaluation report...
  41. ncbi request reprint Hypnosis reduces distress and duration of an invasive medical procedure for children
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Pediatrics 115:e77-85. 2005
    ..This study was designed to examine whether relaxation and analgesia facilitated with hypnosis could reduce distress and procedure time for children who undergo this procedure...
  42. ncbi request reprint Repression and high anxiety are associated with aberrant diurnal cortisol rhythms in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Health Psychol 23:645-50. 2004
    ..Diurnal slope was similar for repressers and high-anxious groups. Groups did not differ on mean cortisol levels, nor did they differ on intercept (morning) values...
  43. ncbi request reprint Coping, social support, and attachment style as psychosocial correlates of adjustment in men and women with HIV/AIDS
    Julie M Turner-Cobb
    Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Behav Med 25:337-53. 2002
    ..Implications for physical health outcome and opportunities for intervention are discussed...
  44. ncbi request reprint Design decisions to optimize reliability of daytime cortisol slopes in an older population
    Helena C Kraemer
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 14:325-33. 2006
    ..How best to estimate that slope with minimal burden to the participants and the cost of the study is a decision often made without empiric foundation...
  45. ncbi request reprint Depression and cancer: mechanisms and disease progression
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 54:269-82. 2003
    ..Depression also affects components of immune function that may affect cancer surveillance. Thus, there is evidence of a bidirectional relationship between cancer and depression, offering new opportunities for therapeutic intervention...
  46. ncbi request reprint The interaction of social network size and stressful life events predict delayed-type hypersensitivity among women with metastatic breast cancer
    Julie M Turner-Cobb
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Int J Psychophysiol 54:241-9. 2004
    ..The relationship between social network size and immune response in women with metastatic breast cancer depends on prior stressful life experience...
  47. ncbi request reprint Circadian disruption in cancer: a neuroendocrine-immune pathway from stress to disease?
    Sandra Sephton
    James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 500 South Preston Street, Room 210, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 17:321-8. 2003
    ..Thus, stress-related circadian disruption may have negative implications for cancer prognosis. Psychosocial effects on cancer progression may be measured, and possibly mediated, by disruption of circadian function...
  48. doi request reprint Use and misuse of the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT) guidelines to assess research findings: comment on Coyne, Stefanek, and Palmer (2007)
    Helena C Kraemer
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychol Bull 135:173-8; discussion 179-82. 2009
    ..to recommend stopping research in an area that may be highly productive. Recent developments in the field are summarized. It is a mistaken and dangerous conclusion to declare this or other areas of scientific research off limits...
  49. doi request reprint Psychosocial predictors of resilience after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nerv Ment Dis 197:266-73. 2009
    ..These findings highlight the role of emotional, coping, social support, and particularly, cognitive variables in adjustment after terrorism...
  50. doi request reprint Concerns about sexuality after breast cancer
    Patricia Fobair
    Supportive Care Program, Stanford Hospital Cancer Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    Cancer J 15:19-26. 2009
    ..Other solutions include effective psychologic and emotional counseling and pharmaceutical and over the counter assistance for hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and pain to assist with the physiological issues...

Research Grants28

  1. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT ON CANCER SURVIVAL
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..These studies will determine whether psychosocial support should be added to the standard treatment regimen because of proven medical as well as psychological benefit...
  2. PSYCHOSOCIAL TREATMENT EFFECTS ON CANCER SURVIVAL
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The recruitment of this diverse sample of patients will also increase generalizability of findings regarding group psychotherapy outcome and its predictors. ..
  3. GROUP INTERVENTIONS TO PREVENT HIV IN HIGH RISK WOMEN
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..We will examine three mediators of treatment effectiveness, including: 1) trauma reactive and resilient beliefs about self and the world; 2) differentiation and integration of self; and 3) interpersonal relations. ..
  4. Sleep, Circadian, Hormonal Dysregulation, and Breast Cancer Survival
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..We will relate these measures to the subsequent course of breast cancer progression. Results of this study will provide specific evidence regarding how improved sleep management may affect the course of breast cancer. ..
  5. Stress, the HPA and Health in Aging
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  6. PSYCHOSOCIAL TREATMENT EFFECTS ON CANCER SURVIVAL
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ....
  7. Sleep, Circadian, Hormonal Dysregulation, and Breast Cancer Survival
    David Spiegel; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We will relate these measures to the subsequent course of breast cancer progression. Results of this study will provide specific evidence regarding how improved sleep management may affect the course of breast cancer. ..