G N Somero

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Peter Hochachka: adventures in biochemical adaptation
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950 3094, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 67:25-37. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Transcriptomic responses to heat stress in invasive and native blue mussels (genus Mytilus): molecular correlates of invasive success
    Brent L Lockwood
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:3548-58. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint The physiology of global change: linking patterns to mechanisms
    George N Somero
    Department of Biology, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Ann Rev Mar Sci 4:39-61. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Comparative physiology: a "crystal ball" for predicting consequences of global change
    George N Somero
    Hopkins Marine Station, Dept of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301:R1-14. 2011
  5. doi request reprint The physiology of climate change: how potentials for acclimatization and genetic adaptation will determine 'winners' and 'losers'
    G N Somero
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:912-20. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint Following the heart: temperature and salinity effects on heart rate in native and invasive species of blue mussels (genus Mytilus)
    Caren E Braby
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2554-66. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Adaptation of enzymes to temperature: searching for basic "strategies"
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 139:321-33. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Protein adaptations to temperature and pressure: complementary roles of adaptive changes in amino acid sequence and internal milieu
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 136:577-91. 2003
  9. pmc Hot spots in cold adaptation: localized increases in conformational flexibility in lactate dehydrogenase A4 orthologs of Antarctic notothenioid fishes
    P A Fields
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:11476-81. 1998
  10. ncbi request reprint Temperature adaptation in Gillichthys (Teleost: Gobiidae) A(4)-lactate dehydrogenases: identical primary structures produce subtly different conformations
    Peter A Fields
    Hopkins Marine Station, Biological Sciences Department, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1293-303. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. ncbi request reprint Peter Hochachka: adventures in biochemical adaptation
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950 3094, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 67:25-37. 2005
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Transcriptomic responses to heat stress in invasive and native blue mussels (genus Mytilus): molecular correlates of invasive success
    Brent L Lockwood
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:3548-58. 2010
    ..galloprovincialis and showed only a small change in M. trossulus. These different responses to acute heat stress may help to explain--and predict--the invasive success of M. galloprovincialis in a warming world...
  3. ncbi request reprint The physiology of global change: linking patterns to mechanisms
    George N Somero
    Department of Biology, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Ann Rev Mar Sci 4:39-61. 2012
    ..offset abiotic stress? Can physiological measurements, including new molecular ("-omic") approaches, provide indices of the degree of sublethal stress an organism experiences? And can physiological evolution keep pace with global change?..
  4. doi request reprint Comparative physiology: a "crystal ball" for predicting consequences of global change
    George N Somero
    Hopkins Marine Station, Dept of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301:R1-14. 2011
    ..7) Losses of protein-coding genes and temperature-responsive gene regulatory abilities in stenothermal ectotherms of the Southern Ocean may lead to broad extinctions...
  5. doi request reprint The physiology of climate change: how potentials for acclimatization and genetic adaptation will determine 'winners' and 'losers'
    G N Somero
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:912-20. 2010
    ..These extreme stenotherms, along with warm-adapted eurytherms living near their thermal limits, may be the major 'losers' from climate change...
  6. ncbi request reprint Following the heart: temperature and salinity effects on heart rate in native and invasive species of blue mussels (genus Mytilus)
    Caren E Braby
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2554-66. 2006
    ..galloprovincialis, the potential for further range expansion along the Pacific coast of North America...
  7. ncbi request reprint Adaptation of enzymes to temperature: searching for basic "strategies"
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 139:321-33. 2004
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Protein adaptations to temperature and pressure: complementary roles of adaptive changes in amino acid sequence and internal milieu
    George N Somero
    Department of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 136:577-91. 2003
    ..Protein-stabilizing solutes like trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) conserve protein function and structure at elevated hydrostatic pressures...
  9. pmc Hot spots in cold adaptation: localized increases in conformational flexibility in lactate dehydrogenase A4 orthologs of Antarctic notothenioid fishes
    P A Fields
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:11476-81. 1998
    ..However, at a common temperature of measurement, the higher configurational entropy of a cold-adapted enzyme may foster conformations that bind ligands poorly, leading to high Km values relative to warm-adapted orthologs...
  10. ncbi request reprint Temperature adaptation in Gillichthys (Teleost: Gobiidae) A(4)-lactate dehydrogenases: identical primary structures produce subtly different conformations
    Peter A Fields
    Hopkins Marine Station, Biological Sciences Department, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1293-303. 2002
    ..Subtle differences in conformation around this residue probably play a role both in altered flexibility and in the potentially adaptive differences in kinetics between the two A(4)-LDH forms...
  11. ncbi request reprint Intrinsic versus extrinsic stabilization of enzymes: the interaction of solutes and temperature on A4-lactate dehydrogenase orthologs from warm-adapted and cold-adapted marine fishes
    P A Fields
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950 3094, USA
    Eur J Biochem 268:4497-505. 2001
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint The cellular response to heat stress in the goby Gillichthys mirabilis: a cDNA microarray and protein-level analysis
    Bradley A Buckley
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2660-77. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Interspecific- and acclimation-induced variation in levels of heat-shock proteins 70 (hsp70) and 90 (hsp90) and heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF1) in congeneric marine snails (genus Tegula): implications for regulation of hsp gene expression
    Lars Tomanek
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:677-85. 2002
    ..The ratio of hsp72 to hsp74 may provide a more accurate estimate of environmental heat stress than the total concentrations of both hsp70 isoforms...
  14. doi request reprint Transcriptional responses to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal fish Gillichthys mirabilis (Cooper 1864)
    Cheryl A Logan
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 299:R843-52. 2010
    ..This pattern of transcriptional alteration in steady-state acclimated fish may be a signature of eurythermy...
  15. ncbi request reprint Changes in gene expression associated with acclimation to constant temperatures and fluctuating daily temperatures in an annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus
    Jason E Podrabsky
    Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:2237-54. 2004
    ..This study illustrates the utility of cDNA microarray approaches in both hypothesis-driven and 'discovery-based' investigations of environmental effects on organisms...
  16. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary convergence in adaptation of proteins to temperature: A4-lactate dehydrogenases of Pacific damselfishes (Chromis spp.)
    Glenn C Johns
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California1, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 21:314-20. 2004
    ....
  17. doi request reprint A microarray-based transcriptomic time-course of hyper- and hypo-osmotic stress signaling events in the euryhaline fish Gillichthys mirabilis: osmosensors to effectors
    Tyler G Evans
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:3636-49. 2008
    ..Our data indicate multiple major signaling pathways work in concert to modify diverse effectors, and that these molecules operate within a framework of regulatory proteins...
  18. doi request reprint Transcriptomic responses to salinity stress in invasive and native blue mussels (genus Mytilus)
    Brent L Lockwood
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Mol Ecol 20:517-29. 2011
    ..galloprovincialis and M. trossulus in response to salinity stress are subtle and involve only a minor fraction of the overall suite of gene regulatory responses...
  19. ncbi request reprint A comparative analysis of the evolutionary patterning and mechanistic bases of lactate dehydrogenase thermal stability in porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes
    J H Stillman
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:767-76. 2001
    ..We conclude that the overall structural stability and functional properties of proteins can evolve independently and that in vivo protein-protein interactions can provide another means to regulate protein stability selectively...
  20. ncbi request reprint Time course and magnitude of synthesis of heat-shock proteins in congeneric marine snails (Genus tegula) from different tidal heights
    L Tomanek
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950 3094, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 73:249-56. 2000
    ..brunnea but not in T. funebralis. The different time courses and magnitudes of hsp synthesis in these congeners suggest that the vertical limits of their distributions may be set in part by thermal stress...
  21. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary and acclimation-induced variation in the thermal limits of heart function in congeneric marine snails (genus Tegula): implications for vertical zonation
    Emily Stenseng
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950 3094, USA
    Biol Bull 208:138-44. 2005
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic relationships and biochemical properties of the duplicated cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of malate dehydrogenase from a teleost fish, Sphyraena idiastes
    Jen Jen Lin
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 3094 USA
    J Mol Evol 54:107-17. 2002
    ....
  23. doi request reprint Temperature adaptation of cytosolic malate dehydrogenases of limpets (genus Lottia): differences in stability and function due to minor changes in sequence correlate with biogeographic and vertical distributions
    Yunwei Dong
    Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:169-77. 2009
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Heat-shock protein expression is absent in the antarctic fish Trematomus bernacchii (family Nototheniidae)
    G E Hofmann
    Department of Biology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 1501, USA
    J Exp Biol 203:2331-9. 2000
    ....
  25. pmc An inducible 70 kDa-class heat shock protein is constitutively expressed during early development and diapause in the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus
    Jason E Podrabsky
    Department of Biology, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207 0751, USA
    Cell Stress Chaperones 12:199-204. 2007
    ..Constitutive expression of Hsp70 during development may afford these embryos protection from environmental stresses during development more quickly than relying on the induction of a classic heat shock response...
  26. ncbi request reprint Base compositions of genes encoding alpha-actin and lactate dehydrogenase-A from differently adapted vertebrates show no temperature-adaptive variation in G + C content
    Rachael A Ream
    Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 20:105-10. 2003
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint Obituary: Peter W. Hochachka (1937-2002)
    George N Somero
    Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA
    Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol 133:471-3. 2002
  28. ncbi request reprint Local selection and latitudinal variation in a marine predator-prey interaction
    Eric Sanford
    Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Science 300:1135-7. 2003
    ..Marine communities separated by hundreds of kilometers may have intrinsically different dynamics, with interactions shaped by restricted gene flow and spatially varying selection...
  29. ncbi request reprint Temperature sensitivities of cytosolic malate dehydrogenases from native and invasive species of marine mussels (genus Mytilus): sequence-function linkages and correlations with biogeographic distribution
    Peter A Fields
    Biology Department, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604 3003, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:656-67. 2006
    ..The relative warm adaptation of M. galloprovincialis cMDH may be one of a suite of physiological characters that enhance the competitive ability of this invasive species in warm habitats...
  30. ncbi request reprint Biochemical adaptations of notothenioid fishes: comparisons between cold temperate South American and New Zealand species and Antarctic species
    Zulema L Coppes Petricorena
    Faculty of Chemistry, Montevideo, Uruguay
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 147:799-807. 2007
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Preface to Peter Hochachka memorial volume
    George N Somero
    Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 139:311-5. 2004
  32. ncbi request reprint Influences of thermal acclimation and acute temperature change on the motility of epithelial wound-healing cells (keratocytes) of tropical, temperate and Antarctic fish
    Rachael A Ream
    Biochemistry Department, Beckman Center, Room 473A, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5307, USA
    J Exp Biol 206:4539-51. 2003
    ..Keratocytes represent a useful study system for evaluating the effects of temperature at the cellular level and for studying adaptive variation in actin-based cellular movement and capacity for wound healing...