Stephen Smith

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Circuit reconstruction tools today
    Stephen J Smith
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 17:601-8. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Neural activity and the dynamics of central nervous system development
    Jackie Yuanyuan Hua
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center B141, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:327-32. 2004
  3. pmc Single-synapse analysis of a diverse synapse population: proteomic imaging methods and markers
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 68:639-53. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Strong effects of subphysiological temperature on the function and plasticity of mammalian presynaptic terminals
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 25:7481-8. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Evidence from in vivo imaging that synaptogenesis guides the growth and branching of axonal arbors by two distinct mechanisms
    Martin P Meyer
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 26:3604-14. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 70:467-76. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for cellular and neural imaging
    Ofer Levi
    Solid State and Photonics Laboratory, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Opt 46:1881-9. 2007
  8. pmc Array tomography: a new tool for imaging the molecular architecture and ultrastructure of neural circuits
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 55:25-36. 2007
  9. pmc Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for chronic, minimally-invasive imaging of brain function
    Thomas T Lee
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1025-8. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Regulation of axon growth in vivo by activity-based competition
    Jackie Yuanyuan Hua
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 434:1022-6. 2005

Research Grants

  1. Dendrite Growth and Synaptogenesis in Zebrafish CNS
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2007
  2. Dendrite Growth and Synaptogenesis in Zebrafish CNS
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF CORTICAL DEVELOPMENT
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2002
  4. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF CORTICAL DEVELOPMENT
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 1993

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. pmc Circuit reconstruction tools today
    Stephen J Smith
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 17:601-8. 2007
    ..Now, new transgenic tool mice and new image acquisition tools appear poised to permit very significant advances in our abilities to reconstruct circuit connection topologies and molecular architectures...
  2. ncbi request reprint Neural activity and the dynamics of central nervous system development
    Jackie Yuanyuan Hua
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center B141, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:327-32. 2004
    ..Neural activity modulates development through biasing this process of formation and elimination, promoting the formation and stabilization of appropriate synaptic connections on the basis of functional activity patterns...
  3. pmc Single-synapse analysis of a diverse synapse population: proteomic imaging methods and markers
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 68:639-53. 2010
    ..These results establish a means for the high-throughput acquisition of proteomic data from individual cortical synapses in situ...
  4. ncbi request reprint Strong effects of subphysiological temperature on the function and plasticity of mammalian presynaptic terminals
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 25:7481-8. 2005
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Evidence from in vivo imaging that synaptogenesis guides the growth and branching of axonal arbors by two distinct mechanisms
    Martin P Meyer
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 26:3604-14. 2006
    ..These observations thus provide evidence that synaptogenesis guides axon arbor growth by first promoting initial branch extension and second by selective branch stabilization...
  6. ncbi request reprint Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 70:467-76. 2006
    ..Finally, the action of pregabalin on dye release is most apparent before and early during a train of electrical stimuli when vesicle release preferentially involves the readily releasable pool...
  7. ncbi request reprint Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for cellular and neural imaging
    Ofer Levi
    Solid State and Photonics Laboratory, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Opt 46:1881-9. 2007
    ..Finally, we characterized a thermally evaporated emission filter that can be used to improve sensitivity for in vivo fluorescence sensing...
  8. pmc Array tomography: a new tool for imaging the molecular architecture and ultrastructure of neural circuits
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 55:25-36. 2007
    ..The application of array tomography can reveal important but previously unseen features of brain molecular architecture...
  9. pmc Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for chronic, minimally-invasive imaging of brain function
    Thomas T Lee
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1025-8. 2006
    ..In this work we describe the proposed system and show that near-infrared IOS imaging at wavelengths compatible with semiconductor devices can produce physiologically significant images in mice, even through skull...
  10. ncbi request reprint Regulation of axon growth in vivo by activity-based competition
    Jackie Yuanyuan Hua
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 434:1022-6. 2005
    ..These results therefore identify a new form of activity-based competition rule that might be a key regulator of axon growth and branch initiation...
  11. ncbi request reprint Characterization of zebrafish PSD-95 gene family members
    Martin P Meyer
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    J Neurobiol 63:91-105. 2005
    ..These data are consistent with the idea that PSD-95 family members are involved in synapse assembly and function, and provide a platform for future functional studies in vivo in a highly tractable model organism...
  12. ncbi request reprint In vivo trafficking and targeting of N-cadherin to nascent presynaptic terminals
    James D Jontes
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5345, USA
    J Neurosci 24:9027-34. 2004
    ..In addition, we have begun to investigate the cell biology of N-cadherin trafficking and targeting in the context of an intact vertebrate embryo...
  13. ncbi request reprint Live optical imaging of nervous system development
    Cristopher M Niell
    Neurosciences Program and Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 66:771-98. 2004
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Integrated bio-fluorescence sensor
    Evan Thrush
    Solid State and Photonics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Chromatogr A 1013:103-10. 2003
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Retrograde regulation of synaptic vesicle endocytosis and recycling
    Kristina D Micheva
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:925-32. 2003
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Knowing a nascent synapse when you see it
    Susanne E Ahmari
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center, Room B100, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 34:333-6. 2002
    ..New experimental techniques are beginning to illuminate the processes involved in synaptogenesis, but much remains to be learned, including simply how to recognize the synapse in its nascent form...
  17. pmc Detection of glutamate release from neurons by genetically encoded surface-displayed FRET nanosensors
    Sakiko Okumoto
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8740-5. 2005
    ..The results demonstrate that FLIPE sensors can be used for real-time monitoring of glutamate metabolism in living cells, in tissues, or in intact organisms, providing tools for studying metabolism or for drug discovery...
  18. ncbi request reprint Mitochondria and release at hippocampal synapses
    Jack Waters
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Pflugers Arch 447:363-70. 2003
    ..A comparison of vesicular release in response to stimulation at 1 Hz and at 10 Hz revealed no differences in release properties between synapses with and without mitochondria...
  19. ncbi request reprint The classical complement cascade mediates CNS synapse elimination
    Beth Stevens
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 131:1164-78. 2007
    ..These findings support a model in which unwanted synapses are tagged by complement for elimination and suggest that complement-mediated synapse elimination may become aberrantly reactivated in neurodegenerative disease...
  20. pmc Classical MHCI molecules regulate retinogeniculate refinement and limit ocular dominance plasticity
    Akash Datwani
    Departments of Biology, James H Clark Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 64:463-70. 2009
    ..H2-K(b) and H2-D(b) ligands, signaling via neuronal MHCI receptors, may enable activity-dependent remodeling of brain circuits during developmental critical periods...
  21. pmc Vesicle pool partitioning influences presynaptic diversity and weighting in rat hippocampal synapses
    Jack Waters
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, Stanford Medical School, Stanford 94305, USA
    J Physiol 541:811-23. 2002
    ..Since hippocampal single unit firing rates shift between 1 Hz and 10 Hz regimes with behavioural state, differential partitioning may be a mechanism for encoding information in hippocampal circuits...
  22. ncbi request reprint Functional imaging reveals rapid development of visual response properties in the zebrafish tectum
    Cristopher M Niell
    Neutosciences Program, Department of Molecular and Cell Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 45:941-51. 2005
    ..Surprisingly, most of these properties are established soon after dendrite growth and synaptogenesis begin and do not require patterned visual experience or a protracted period of refinement...
  23. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of synapse formation on a growing dendritic arbor
    Cristopher M Niell
    Neurosciences Program, Beckman Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:254-60. 2004
    ..These findings support a 'synaptotropic model' in which synapse formation can direct dendrite arborization...
  24. ncbi request reprint Stability and plasticity of developing synapses in hippocampal neuronal cultures
    F Woodward Hopf
    Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, Emeryville, California 94608, Abteilung, Germany
    J Neurosci 22:775-81. 2002
    ..These observations provide new information on the stability of developing presynaptic function and suggest that NMDA receptor activation may regulate the stability of developing synapses...

Research Grants19

  1. Dendrite Growth and Synaptogenesis in Zebrafish CNS
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In addition, the developmental insights obtained may point to unexpected therapeutic opportunities for treating disorders of vision, and repairing effects of neurological trauma, neurodegeneration, and drug addiction. ..
  2. Dendrite Growth and Synaptogenesis in Zebrafish CNS
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In addition, the developmental insights obtained may point to unexpected therapeutic opportunities for l]'eating disorders of vision, and repairing effects of neurological trauma, neurodegeneration, and drug addiction. ..
  3. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF CORTICAL DEVELOPMENT
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..This work should also help in efforts to devise rational strategies to promote central nervous system regeneration and recovery of function following trauma and stroke. ..
  4. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF CORTICAL DEVELOPMENT
    Stephen Smith; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Finally, they may elucidate the developmental basis for normal aging effects on nervous system function and also for degenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases...