Jan M Skotheim

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc An algorithm to automate yeast segmentation and tracking
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e57970. 2013
  2. pmc Positive feedback of G1 cyclins ensures coherent cell cycle entry
    Jan M Skotheim
    Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University, New York 10065, USA
    Nature 454:291-6. 2008
  3. pmc Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast
    Stefano Di Talia
    The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA
    PLoS Biol 7:e1000221. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint The effects of molecular noise and size control on variability in the budding yeast cell cycle
    Stefano Di Talia
    The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Nature 448:947-51. 2007
  5. pmc Commitment to a cellular transition precedes genome-wide transcriptional change
    Umut Eser
    Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 43:515-27. 2011
  6. pmc Distinct interactions select and maintain a specific cell fate
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 43:528-39. 2011
  7. pmc Feedforward regulation ensures stability and rapid reversibility of a cellular state
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 50:856-68. 2013
  8. pmc Start and the restriction point
    Amy Johnson
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 25:717-23. 2013
  9. pmc Cell size control in yeast
    Jonathan J Turner
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 22:R350-9. 2012
  10. pmc Evolution of networks and sequences in eukaryotic cell cycle control
    Frederick R Cross
    The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3532-44. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. pmc An algorithm to automate yeast segmentation and tracking
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e57970. 2013
    ..Results from the entire set of thresholds are then used to perform a robust final segmentation...
  2. pmc Positive feedback of G1 cyclins ensures coherent cell cycle entry
    Jan M Skotheim
    Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University, New York 10065, USA
    Nature 454:291-6. 2008
    ..A similar G1/S regulatory network in mammalian cells, comprised of non-orthologous genes, suggests either conservation of regulatory architecture or convergent evolution...
  3. pmc Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast
    Stefano Di Talia
    The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA
    PLoS Biol 7:e1000221. 2009
    ..This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle...
  4. ncbi request reprint The effects of molecular noise and size control on variability in the budding yeast cell cycle
    Stefano Di Talia
    The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Nature 448:947-51. 2007
    ..This analysis decomposes the regulatory dynamics of the Start transition into two independent modules, a size sensing module and a timing module, each of which is predominantly controlled by a different G1 cyclin...
  5. pmc Commitment to a cellular transition precedes genome-wide transcriptional change
    Umut Eser
    Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 43:515-27. 2011
    ..bayanus and S. cerevisiae, as well as human cells. The widespread use of the feedback-first motif in eukaryotic cell-cycle control, implemented by nonorthologous proteins, suggests its frequent deployment at cellular transitions...
  6. pmc Distinct interactions select and maintain a specific cell fate
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 43:528-39. 2011
    ....
  7. pmc Feedforward regulation ensures stability and rapid reversibility of a cellular state
    Andreas Doncic
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 50:856-68. 2013
    ....
  8. pmc Start and the restriction point
    Amy Johnson
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 25:717-23. 2013
    ..Here, we review recent studies defining the conserved and diverged features of G1 control and highlight systems-level aspects that may be common to other biological regulatory networks. ..
  9. pmc Cell size control in yeast
    Jonathan J Turner
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 22:R350-9. 2012
    ....
  10. pmc Evolution of networks and sequences in eukaryotic cell cycle control
    Frederick R Cross
    The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3532-44. 2011
    ....