Manpreet K Singh

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Reward processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 52:68-83. 2013
  2. pmc Volumetric reductions in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Bipolar Disord 14:585-96. 2012
  3. pmc Information processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Jane Whitney
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 53:937-45. 2012
  4. pmc The neural effects of psychotropic medications in children and adolescents
    Manpreet K Singh
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am 21:753-71. 2012
  5. pmc Atypical antipsychotics for acute manic and mixed episodes in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder: efficacy and tolerability
    Manpreet K Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Drugs 70:433-42. 2010
  6. pmc Brain glutamatergic characteristics of pediatric offspring of parents with bipolar disorder
    Manpreet Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychiatry Res 182:165-71. 2010
  7. pmc Neurochemical deficits in the cerebellar vermis in child offspring of parents with bipolar disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Research Program, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bipolar Disord 13:189-97. 2011
  8. pmc Neural correlates of response inhibition in pediatric bipolar disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 20:15-24. 2010
  9. pmc Characterization and factors associated with sleep quality in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Donna J Roybal
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 42:724-40. 2011
  10. pmc Abnormal amygdala and prefrontal cortex activation to facial expressions in pediatric bipolar disorder
    Amy S Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 51:821-31. 2012

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. pmc Reward processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 52:68-83. 2013
    ..The objective of this study was to investigate the neural effects of an affective priming task designed to positively induce mood before reward processing in adolescents with and without BD...
  2. pmc Volumetric reductions in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Bipolar Disord 14:585-96. 2012
    ..The goal of this study was to examine whether youth with bipolar I disorder who recently experienced their first episode of mania are characterized by brain volumetric abnormalities...
  3. pmc Information processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Jane Whitney
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 53:937-45. 2012
    ..Information-processing biases related to memory and attention likely play a role in the development and persistence of BD among adolescents; however, these biases have not been extensively studied in youth with BD...
  4. pmc The neural effects of psychotropic medications in children and adolescents
    Manpreet K Singh
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am 21:753-71. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Atypical antipsychotics for acute manic and mixed episodes in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder: efficacy and tolerability
    Manpreet K Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Drugs 70:433-42. 2010
    ..Additional longitudinal and biological studies are warranted to characterize the effects of atypical antipsychotics on all phases and stages of bipolar illness development in children and adolescents...
  6. pmc Brain glutamatergic characteristics of pediatric offspring of parents with bipolar disorder
    Manpreet Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychiatry Res 182:165-71. 2010
    ..Longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm whether prefrontal glutamate decreases only after the onset of full mania...
  7. pmc Neurochemical deficits in the cerebellar vermis in child offspring of parents with bipolar disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Research Program, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bipolar Disord 13:189-97. 2011
    ....
  8. pmc Neural correlates of response inhibition in pediatric bipolar disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 20:15-24. 2010
    ..We aimed to examine response inhibition in this population, as an element of executive function, which, if aberrant, may interfere with learning and information processing...
  9. pmc Characterization and factors associated with sleep quality in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Donna J Roybal
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 42:724-40. 2011
    ..Further studies are needed to determine whether early regulation of sleep would improve long-term outcome in BD youth...
  10. pmc Abnormal amygdala and prefrontal cortex activation to facial expressions in pediatric bipolar disorder
    Amy S Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 51:821-31. 2012
    ..The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late phase of activation, suggesting different temporal characteristics of brain responses...
  11. pmc Early psychosocial intervention for youth at risk for bipolar I or II disorder: a one-year treatment development trial
    David J Miklowitz
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Bipolar Disord 13:67-75. 2011
    ..In a one-year open trial, we tested a version of family-focused treatment adapted for youth at high risk for bipolar disorder (FFT-HR)...
  12. pmc Neural processing of reward and loss in girls at risk for major depression
    Ian H Gotlib
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 67:380-7. 2010
    ..Deficits in reward processing and their neural correlates have been associated with major depression. However, it is unclear if these deficits precede the onset of depression or are a consequence of this disorder...