KRISHNA V contact SHENOY

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A dynamical systems view of motor preparation: implications for neural prosthetic system design
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Prog Brain Res 192:33-58. 2011
  2. doi request reprint Cortical control of arm movements: a dynamical systems perspective
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford Institute for Neuro Innovation and TranslationalNeuroscience, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 36:337-59. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Brain enabled by next-generation neurotechnology: using multiscale and multimodal models
    KRISHNA SHENOY
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Neurobiology Program, Stanford University, California, USA
    IEEE Pulse 3:31-6. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Increasing the performance of cortically-controlled prostheses
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc . 2006
  5. pmc A closed-loop human simulator for investigating the role of feedback control in brain-machine interfaces
    John P Cunningham
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 105:1932-49. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Optimal target placement for neural communication prostheses
    John P Cunningham
    Dept of Electr Eng, Stanford Univ, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:2912-5. 2006
  7. pmc Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for chronic, minimally-invasive imaging of brain function
    Thomas T Lee
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1025-8. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint An autonomous, broadband, multi-channel neural recording system for freely behaving primates
    Michael D Linderman
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1212-5. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Neural recording stability of chronic electrode arrays in freely behaving primates
    Michael D Linderman
    Dept of Electr Eng, Stanford Univ, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:4387-91. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Multiday electrophysiological recordings from freely behaving primates
    Vikash Gilja
    Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, California, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:5643-6. 2006

Research Grants

  1. CRCNS: Extracting Dynamical Structure Embedded in Motor Preparatory Activity
    KRISHNA SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2009
  2. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Human
    KRISHNA SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2009
  3. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Humans
    KRISHNA V contact SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2010
  4. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Humans
    Krishna V Shenoy; Fiscal Year: 2010

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. pmc A dynamical systems view of motor preparation: implications for neural prosthetic system design
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Prog Brain Res 192:33-58. 2011
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Cortical control of arm movements: a dynamical systems perspective
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford Institute for Neuro Innovation and TranslationalNeuroscience, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 36:337-59. 2013
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Brain enabled by next-generation neurotechnology: using multiscale and multimodal models
    KRISHNA SHENOY
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Neurobiology Program, Stanford University, California, USA
    IEEE Pulse 3:31-6. 2012
    ..g., to sudden physiological changes) and what can be done to encourage recovery from such (reversible) injury. In this article, we summarize some of the team's technical goals, approaches, and early illustrative results...
  4. ncbi request reprint Increasing the performance of cortically-controlled prostheses
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc . 2006
    ..Taken together, these results should substantially increase the clinical viability of cortical prostheses...
  5. pmc A closed-loop human simulator for investigating the role of feedback control in brain-machine interfaces
    John P Cunningham
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 105:1932-49. 2011
    ..These findings illustrate the type of discovery made possible by the OPS, and so we hypothesize that this novel testing approach will help in the design of prosthetic systems that will translate well to human patients...
  6. ncbi request reprint Optimal target placement for neural communication prostheses
    John P Cunningham
    Dept of Electr Eng, Stanford Univ, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:2912-5. 2006
    ..These results indicate that the optimal target placement algorithm is a valuable tool for designing high-performance prosthetic systems...
  7. pmc Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for chronic, minimally-invasive imaging of brain function
    Thomas T Lee
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1025-8. 2006
    ..In this work we describe the proposed system and show that near-infrared IOS imaging at wavelengths compatible with semiconductor devices can produce physiologically significant images in mice, even through skull...
  8. ncbi request reprint An autonomous, broadband, multi-channel neural recording system for freely behaving primates
    Michael D Linderman
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:1212-5. 2006
    ..The recording system, called HermesB, is self-contained, autonomous, programmable and capable of recording broadband neural and head acceleration data to a removable compact flash card for up to 48 hours...
  9. ncbi request reprint Neural recording stability of chronic electrode arrays in freely behaving primates
    Michael D Linderman
    Dept of Electr Eng, Stanford Univ, CA, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:4387-91. 2006
    ..These preliminary results suggest that spike sorting algorithms can no longer assume stable neural signals and will need to transition to adaptive signal processing methodologies to maximize performance...
  10. ncbi request reprint Multiday electrophysiological recordings from freely behaving primates
    Vikash Gilja
    Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, California, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:5643-6. 2006
    ..These initial results motivate the use of such data sets for testing neural prosthetics systems and for finding the neural correlates of natural behaviors...
  11. ncbi request reprint HermesB: a continuous neural recording system for freely behaving primates
    Gopal Santhanam
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 54:2037-50. 2007
    ..These results demonstrate the utility of the HermesB system and motivate using this type of system to advance neural prosthetics and electrophysiological experiments...
  12. pmc Techniques for extracting single-trial activity patterns from large-scale neural recordings
    Mark M Churchland
    Neurosciences Program and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CISX, 330 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 4075, United States
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 17:609-18. 2007
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Cortical neural prosthesis performance improves when eye position is monitored
    Aaron P Batista
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 16:24-31. 2008
    ..We then show that eye position can be estimated directly from neural activity, and thus performance gains can be realized even without a device that tracks eye position...
  14. ncbi request reprint Single-neuron stability during repeated reaching in macaque premotor cortex
    Cynthia A Chestek
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 27:10742-50. 2007
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Free-paced high-performance brain-computer interfaces
    Neil Achtman
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neural Eng 4:336-47. 2007
    ..These results strongly suggest that a completely neurally-driven high-performance brain-computer interface is possible...
  16. ncbi request reprint Pursuit speed compensation in cortical area MSTd
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
    J Neurophysiol 88:2630-47. 2002
    ..These results indicate that many MSTd neurons compensate for pursuit velocity, pursuit direction as previously reported and pursuit speed, and further implicate MSTd as a critical stage in the computation of egomotion...
  17. ncbi request reprint Neural prosthetic control signals from plan activity
    Krishna V Shenoy
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Neuroreport 14:591-6. 2003
    ..We employed maximum likelihood decoders to estimate movement direction and to drive finite state machines governing when to move. Performance exceeded 90% with as few as 40 neurons...
  18. ncbi request reprint Model-based neural decoding of reaching movements: a maximum likelihood approach
    Caleb Kemere
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 51:925-32. 2004
    ..The decoding paradigm presented is tested in simulation using a database of experimentally gathered center-out reaches and corresponding neural data generated from synthetic models...
  19. ncbi request reprint Power feasibility of implantable digital spike sorting circuits for neural prosthetic systems
    Zachary S Zumsteg
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 13:272-9. 2005
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Neural variability in premotor cortex provides a signature of motor preparation
    Mark M Churchland
    Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 26:3697-712. 2006
    ..These results reveal a remarkable degree of temporal structure in the variability of cortical neurons. The relationship with reaction time argues that the changes in variability approximately track the progress of motor preparation...
  21. ncbi request reprint A high-performance brain-computer interface
    Gopal Santhanam
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 330 Serra Mall, 319 Paul G Allen Center for Integrated Systems Annex, Stanford, California 94305 4075, USA
    Nature 442:195-8. 2006
    ..These performance results and their implications for system design should substantially increase the clinical viability of BCIs in humans...
  22. ncbi request reprint Preparatory activity in premotor and motor cortex reflects the speed of the upcoming reach
    Mark M Churchland
    Neurosciences Program and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:3130-46. 2006
    ..We conclude that delay-period preparatory activity robustly reflects a nonspatial aspect of the upcoming reach. However, it is unclear whether the recorded neural responses conform to any simple reference frame, intrinsic or extrinsic...
  23. ncbi request reprint Delay of movement caused by disruption of cortical preparatory activity
    Mark M Churchland
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Neurosciences Program, 330 Serra Mall, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 97:348-59. 2007
    ..These results are readily interpreted in the context of the recently developed optimal-subspace hypothesis...
  24. pmc A central source of movement variability
    Mark M Churchland
    Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 52:1085-96. 2006
    ..Thus, even for a highly practiced task, the ability to repeatedly plan the same movement limits our ability to repeatedly execute the same movement...
  25. ncbi request reprint Mixture of trajectory models for neural decoding of goal-directed movements
    Byron M Yu
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, CA 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 97:3763-80. 2007
    ..Taken together, these advances should allow prosthetic cursors or limbs to be moved more accurately toward intended reach goals...
  26. ncbi request reprint Temporal complexity and heterogeneity of single-neuron activity in premotor and motor cortex
    Mark M Churchland
    Neurosciences Program and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 97:4235-57. 2007
    ..It has been argued that complex and heterogeneous responses are expected of a recurrent network that produces temporally patterned outputs, and the present results would seem to support this view...
  27. ncbi request reprint Reference frames for reach planning in macaque dorsal premotor cortex
    Aaron P Batista
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4075, USA
    J Neurophysiol 98:966-83. 2007
    ..First, they may encode reach goals using a reference frame we did not investigate, such as intrinsic reference frames. Second, they may not be adequately characterized by any reference frame...
  28. ncbi request reprint Response of MSTd neurons to simulated 3D orientation of rotating planes
    Hiroki Sugihara
    Laboratory of Neural Control, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Aichi 444 8585, Japan
    J Neurophysiol 87:273-85. 2002
    ..These results suggest that MSTd neurons are sensitive to stimulus features specific to the perceived 3D orientation of the rotating plane stimuli and suggest that area MSTd is involved in SFM processing...

Research Grants9

  1. CRCNS: Extracting Dynamical Structure Embedded in Motor Preparatory Activity
    KRISHNA SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The proposed research program will increase our understanding of how PMd rapidly prepares movements, and thereby help increase the speed and accuracy of prosthetic systems. ..
  2. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Human
    KRISHNA SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..neuroscience investigations of motor control, applied neuroscience/neuroengineering aimed at designing robust and high-performance neural prostheses, and large patient populations whose quality of life will be dramatically improved ..
  3. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Humans
    KRISHNA V contact SHENOY; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..abstract_text> ..
  4. Toward an Animal Model of Freely Moving Humans
    Krishna V Shenoy; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....