Peidong Shen

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc High-quality DNA sequence capture of 524 disease candidate genes
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6549-54. 2011
  2. pmc Y-chromosomal evidence of a pastoralist migration through Tanzania to southern Africa
    Brenna M Henn
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94035 2117, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:10693-8. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Reconstruction of patrilineages and matrilineages of Samaritans and other Israeli populations from Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA sequence variation
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, California 94305 5020, USA
    Hum Mutat 24:248-60. 2004
  4. pmc Identification of rare DNA variants in mitochondrial disorders with improved array-based sequencing
    Wenyi Wang
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 39:44-58. 2011
  5. pmc Frequentist estimation of coalescence times from nucleotide sequence data using a tree-based partition
    Hua Tang
    Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genetics 161:447-59. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Population genetic implications from DNA polymorphism in random human genomic sequences
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Hum Mutat 20:209-17. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc High-quality DNA sequence capture of 524 disease candidate genes
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6549-54. 2011
    ..This shows the ability of LPPs to accurately preserve a sample's genome information and provides a cost-effective strategy to identify both single nucleotide changes and structural variants in targeted resequencing...
  2. pmc Y-chromosomal evidence of a pastoralist migration through Tanzania to southern Africa
    Brenna M Henn
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94035 2117, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:10693-8. 2008
    ..Our Y-chromosomal evidence supports a demic diffusion model of pastoralism from eastern to southern Africa approximately 2,000 years ago...
  3. ncbi request reprint Reconstruction of patrilineages and matrilineages of Samaritans and other Israeli populations from Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA sequence variation
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, California 94305 5020, USA
    Hum Mutat 24:248-60. 2004
    ..Most of the former may be traced back to a common ancestor in the paternally-inherited Jewish high priesthood (Cohanim) at the time of the Assyrian conquest of the kingdom of Israel...
  4. pmc Identification of rare DNA variants in mitochondrial disorders with improved array-based sequencing
    Wenyi Wang
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 39:44-58. 2011
    ..Some patients carried rare heterozygous variants in several functionally interacting genes, which could indicate synergistic genetic effects in these clinically similar disorders...
  5. pmc Frequentist estimation of coalescence times from nucleotide sequence data using a tree-based partition
    Hua Tang
    Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genetics 161:447-59. 2002
    ..Performance of this estimator is compared with existing methods based on the coalescence theory. The method is applied to sequences of Y chromosomes and mtDNAs to estimate the coalescent times of human male and female populations...
  6. ncbi request reprint Population genetic implications from DNA polymorphism in random human genomic sequences
    Peidong Shen
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Hum Mutat 20:209-17. 2002
    ..304+/-0.622, mean+/-SD) and random STSs (D=-0.27) suggests that, in the absence of significant mutation rate heterogeneity, the more negative values for genes are a consequence of directional selection rather than population growth...