Matthew P Scott

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Gene expression during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster
    Michelle N Arbeitman
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 297:2270-5. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Obituary: Edward B. Lewis (1918-2004)
    Matthew P Scott
    Matthew P Scott is in the Departments of Developmental Biology, Genetics and Bioengineering, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5439, USA E mail
    Nature 431:143. 2004
  3. pmc Developmental genomics of the most dangerous animal
    Matthew P Scott
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:11865-6. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Patching the gaps in Hedgehog signalling
    Rajat Rohatgi
    Department of Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Clark Center West W252, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 9:1005-9. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Assessing the conservation of mammalian gene expression using high-density exon arrays
    Yi Xing
    Mol Biol Evol 24:1283-5. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Automated MEMS-based Drosophila embryo injection system for high-throughput RNAi screens
    Stefan Zappe
    E L Ginzton Lab, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4085, USA
    Lab Chip 6:1012-9. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint A Drosophila model of the Niemann-Pick type C lysosome storage disease: dnpc1a is required for molting and sterol homeostasis
    Xun Huang
    Departments of Developmental Biology, Genetics, and Bioengineering, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Development 132:5115-24. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Communicating with Hedgehogs
    Joan E Hooper
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12801 East 17th Avenue, Box 8018, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 6:306-17. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint A genome-wide study of gene activity reveals developmental signaling pathways in the preimplantation mouse embryo
    Q Tian Wang
    Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Cell 6:133-44. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Notch and Ras signaling pathway effector genes expressed in fusion competent and founder cells during Drosophila myogenesis
    Ruben Artero
    Developmental Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Development 130:6257-72. 2003

Collaborators

  • Peter A Lawrence
  • Edward B Lewis
  • Bruce S Baker
  • Simon M Lin
  • Yi Xing
  • Karen Kapur
  • Xun Huang
  • Rajat Rohatgi
  • Stefan Zappe
  • JoAnn Buchanan
  • Joan E Hooper
  • Q Tian Wang
  • Trudy G Oliver
  • Ronald W Davis
  • Ruben Artero
  • Michelle N Arbeitman
  • James T Warren
  • Lawrence I Gilbert
  • Matthew Fish
  • Olav Solgaard
  • Alan J Zhu
  • Kaye Suyama
  • Maria Anna Ciemerych
  • Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz
  • Ljiljana Milenkovic
  • Karolina Piotrowska
  • Karen Beckett
  • Mary Baylies
  • Robert J Wechsler-Reya
  • Constanze Kaiser
  • Christine L Gillingham
  • Eileen E Furlong
  • Rasika Wickramasinghe
  • Linda L Grasfeder
  • Audra L Carroll
  • Eileen E M Furlong
  • Farhad Imam
  • Kevin P White
  • Mark A Krasnow
  • Brian H Null
  • Eric Johnson

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. ncbi request reprint Gene expression during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster
    Michelle N Arbeitman
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 297:2270-5. 2002
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Obituary: Edward B. Lewis (1918-2004)
    Matthew P Scott
    Matthew P Scott is in the Departments of Developmental Biology, Genetics and Bioengineering, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5439, USA E mail
    Nature 431:143. 2004
  3. pmc Developmental genomics of the most dangerous animal
    Matthew P Scott
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:11865-6. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Patching the gaps in Hedgehog signalling
    Rajat Rohatgi
    Department of Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Clark Center West W252, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 9:1005-9. 2007
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Assessing the conservation of mammalian gene expression using high-density exon arrays
    Yi Xing
    Mol Biol Evol 24:1283-5. 2007
    ..Our analysis provides strong evidence for widespread stabilizing selection pressure on transcript abundance during mammalian evolution...
  6. ncbi request reprint Automated MEMS-based Drosophila embryo injection system for high-throughput RNAi screens
    Stefan Zappe
    E L Ginzton Lab, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4085, USA
    Lab Chip 6:1012-9. 2006
    ..01 microM. Almost 80% of the injected embryos expressed an expected strong loss-of-function phenotype. Our system can replace current manual injection technologies and will support systematic identification of Drosophila gene functions...
  7. ncbi request reprint A Drosophila model of the Niemann-Pick type C lysosome storage disease: dnpc1a is required for molting and sterol homeostasis
    Xun Huang
    Departments of Developmental Biology, Genetics, and Bioengineering, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Development 132:5115-24. 2005
    ..We propose that dnpc1a mutants have sterols trapped in aberrant organelles, leading to a shortage of sterol in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria of ring gland cells, and, consequently, inadequate ecdysone synthesis...
  8. ncbi request reprint Communicating with Hedgehogs
    Joan E Hooper
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12801 East 17th Avenue, Box 8018, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 6:306-17. 2005
    ..The cellular machinery that is responsible for the unique molecular mechanisms of Hh signal transduction has been largely conserved during metazoan evolution...
  9. ncbi request reprint A genome-wide study of gene activity reveals developmental signaling pathways in the preimplantation mouse embryo
    Q Tian Wang
    Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Cell 6:133-44. 2004
    ..Overall, these data provide a detailed temporal profile of gene expression that reveals the richness of signaling processes in early mammalian development...
  10. ncbi request reprint Notch and Ras signaling pathway effector genes expressed in fusion competent and founder cells during Drosophila myogenesis
    Ruben Artero
    Developmental Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Development 130:6257-72. 2003
    ..Whereas genes such as phyllopod play a crucial role during specification of particular muscles, others such as tartan are necessary for normal muscle morphogenesis...
  11. pmc Transcriptional profiling of the Sonic hedgehog response: a critical role for N-myc in proliferation of neuronal precursors
    Trudy G Oliver
    Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:7331-6. 2003
    ..Finally, cyclin D1 and N-myc are overexpressed in murine medulloblastoma. These findings suggest that cyclin D1 and N-myc are important mediators of Shh-induced proliferation and tumorigenesis...
  12. ncbi request reprint Drosophila Niemann-Pick type C-2 genes control sterol homeostasis and steroid biosynthesis: a model of human neurodegenerative disease
    Xun Huang
    Department of Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5439, USA
    Development 134:3733-42. 2007
    ..Moreover, npc2a; npc2b double mutants undergo apoptotic neurodegeneration, thus constituting a new fly model of human neurodegenerative disease...