David S Schneider

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Tracing personalized health curves during infections
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 9:e1001158. 2011
  2. pmc Reciprocal analysis of Francisella novicida infections of a Drosophila melanogaster model reveal host-pathogen conflicts mediated by reactive oxygen and imd-regulated innate immune response
    Madeleine G Moule
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1001065. 2010
  3. pmc A signaling protease required for melanization in Drosophila affects resistance and tolerance of infections
    Janelle S Ayres
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 6:2764-73. 2008
  4. pmc How the fly balances its ability to combat different pathogens
    Moria C Chambers
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002970. 2012
  5. pmc The Drosophila TNF ortholog eiger is required in the fat body for a robust immune response
    Eric M Mabery
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    J Innate Immun 2:371-8. 2010
  6. pmc Listeria monocytogenes infection causes metabolic shifts in Drosophila melanogaster
    Moria C Chambers
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e50679. 2012
  7. pmc Screening the fruitfly immune system
    Marc S Dionne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Genome Biol 3:REVIEWS1010. 2002
  8. pmc How and why does a fly turn its immune system off?
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e247. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Plant immunity and film Noir: what gumshoe detectives can teach us about plant-pathogen interactions
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA 94303, USA
    Cell 109:537-40. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Psidin is required in Drosophila blood cells for both phagocytic degradation and immune activation of the fat body
    Catherine A Brennan
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 17:67-72. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. pmc Tracing personalized health curves during infections
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 9:e1001158. 2011
    ..The technique holds promise as both a qualitative and quantitative approach to dissect host-microbe interactions of all kinds...
  2. pmc Reciprocal analysis of Francisella novicida infections of a Drosophila melanogaster model reveal host-pathogen conflicts mediated by reactive oxygen and imd-regulated innate immune response
    Madeleine G Moule
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1001065. 2010
    ..Our work suggests that there may be more to learn about the fly immune system, as not all of the phenotypes we observe can be readily explained by its interactions with known immune responses...
  3. pmc A signaling protease required for melanization in Drosophila affects resistance and tolerance of infections
    Janelle S Ayres
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 6:2764-73. 2008
    ..We suggest that immune responses are highly tuned by evolution, since selection for defenses that alter resistance against one pathogen may change both resistance and tolerance to other pathogens...
  4. pmc How the fly balances its ability to combat different pathogens
    Moria C Chambers
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002970. 2012
    ..In addition, increased phagocytic activity is beneficial during S. pneumoniae infection but detrimental during L. monocytogenes infection, demonstrating an inherent trade-off in the immune response...
  5. pmc The Drosophila TNF ortholog eiger is required in the fat body for a robust immune response
    Eric M Mabery
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    J Innate Immun 2:371-8. 2010
    ..This includes reduced melanization, altered antimicrobial peptide expression and reduced feeding rates. The effect of eiger on feeding rates alone may account for the entire phenotype seen in eiger mutants infected with S. typhimurium...
  6. pmc Listeria monocytogenes infection causes metabolic shifts in Drosophila melanogaster
    Moria C Chambers
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e50679. 2012
    ..Free amino acid levels also change during infection, including a drop in tyrosine levels which may be due to robust L. monocytogenes induced melanization...
  7. pmc Screening the fruitfly immune system
    Marc S Dionne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Genome Biol 3:REVIEWS1010. 2002
    ....
  8. pmc How and why does a fly turn its immune system off?
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e247. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Plant immunity and film Noir: what gumshoe detectives can teach us about plant-pathogen interactions
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA 94303, USA
    Cell 109:537-40. 2002
    ..The demonstration of three separate examples of such a system suggests that it is broadly used and should provoke a reexamination of microbial pathogenesis in animal cells to look for similar mechanisms...
  10. ncbi request reprint Psidin is required in Drosophila blood cells for both phagocytic degradation and immune activation of the fat body
    Catherine A Brennan
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 17:67-72. 2007
    ..These data establish a role for the phagocytic blood cells of Drosophila in detection of infection and activation of the humoral immune response...
  11. pmc Drosophila eiger mutants are sensitive to extracellular pathogens
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 3:e41. 2007
    ..We propose that eiger activates the cellular immune response of the fly to aid clearance of extracellular pathogens. Intracellular pathogens, which can already defeat professional phagocytes, are unaffected by eiger...
  12. pmc Infection-related declines in chill coma recovery and negative geotaxis in Drosophila melanogaster
    Jessica A Linderman
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e41907. 2012
    ..In addition to providing new measures for assessing health, these assays also suggest pathological consequences of and metabolic shifts that may occur over the course of an infection...
  13. pmc Use of a Drosophila model to identify genes regulating Plasmodium growth in the mosquito
    Stephanie M Brandt
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genetics 180:1671-8. 2008
    ..Loss of function of four of these genes in the mosquito affected Plasmodium growth, suggesting that Drosophila can be used effectively as a surrogate mosquito to identify relevant host factors in the mosquito...
  14. pmc The role of anorexia in resistance and tolerance to infections in Drosophila
    Janelle S Ayres
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 7:e1000150. 2009
    ..This suggests that attempts to extend lifespan through diet restriction or the manipulation of pathways mimicking this process will have complicated effects on a host's ability to fight infections...
  15. pmc A specific primed immune response in Drosophila is dependent on phagocytes
    Linh N Pham
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 3:e26. 2007
    ..This work contradicts the paradigm that insect immune responses cannot adapt and will promote the search for similar responses overlooked in organisms with an adaptive immune response...
  16. pmc Pathogenesis of listeria-infected Drosophila wntD mutants is associated with elevated levels of the novel immunity gene edin
    Michael D Gordon
    Department of Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 4:e1000111. 2008
    ..These results are consistent with a model in which the regulation of host factors, including edin, must be tightly controlled to avoid the detrimental consequences of having too much or too little activity...
  17. doi request reprint Two ways to survive infection: what resistance and tolerance can teach us about treating infectious diseases
    David S Schneider
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 8:889-95. 2008
    ..An increased understanding of tolerance to pathogen infection could lead to more efficient treatments for infectious diseases and a better description of host-pathogen interactions...
  18. ncbi request reprint Akt and FOXO dysregulation contribute to infection-induced wasting in Drosophila
    Marc S Dionne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Curr Biol 16:1977-85. 2006
    ..Here, we examine the pathogenesis associated with Mycobacterium marinum infection in the fly. M. marinum is closely related to M. tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis in people...
  19. pmc Bacterial infection of fly ovaries reduces egg production and induces local hemocyte activation
    Stephanie M Brandt
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Comp Immunol 31:1121-30. 2007
    ..This local infection in the ovary resulted in melanization and activation of the cellular immune response at the site of infection...
  20. ncbi request reprint Confronting physiology: how do infected flies die?
    Mimi M Shirasu-Hiza
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Microbiol 9:2775-83. 2007
    ..The molecular study of infection in the fruit fly has focused on the first category, has begun to explore the second, and has yet to tap the full potential of the fly regarding the third...