Krishna Savani

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Let your preference be your guide? Preferences and choices are more tightly linked for North Americans than for Indians
    Krishna Savani
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 95:861-76. 2008
  2. doi request reprint What counts as a choice? U.S. Americans are more likely than Indians to construe actions as choices
    Krishna Savani
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Sci 21:391-8. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Can everyone become highly intelligent? Cultural differences in and societal consequences of beliefs about the universal potential for intelligence
    Aneeta Rattan
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 103:787-803. 2012

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. doi request reprint Let your preference be your guide? Preferences and choices are more tightly linked for North Americans than for Indians
    Krishna Savani
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 95:861-76. 2008
    ..In contrast, Indian contexts reflect and promote a conjoint model of agency, according to which agency is responsive to the desires and expectations of important others and may require restraining one's preferences...
  2. doi request reprint What counts as a choice? U.S. Americans are more likely than Indians to construe actions as choices
    Krishna Savani
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Sci 21:391-8. 2010
    ..Together, they suggest that the positive consequences associated with maximizing the availability of personal choice may not be universal and instead may be limited to North American contexts...
  3. doi request reprint Can everyone become highly intelligent? Cultural differences in and societal consequences of beliefs about the universal potential for intelligence
    Aneeta Rattan
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 103:787-803. 2012
    ..These findings suggest that the belief that only some people have the potential to become highly intelligent is a culturally shaped belief, and one that can lead people to oppose policies aimed at redressing social inequality...