Eric J Rulifson

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Ablation of insulin-producing neurons in flies: growth and diabetic phenotypes
    Eric J Rulifson
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center B300, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Science 296:1118-20. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Conserved mechanisms of glucose sensing and regulation by Drosophila corpora cardiaca cells
    Seung K Kim
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center B300, Stanford, California 94305 5329, USA
    Nature 431:316-20. 2004
  3. pmc The origin of islet-like cells in Drosophila identifies parallels to the vertebrate endocrine axis
    Shu Wang
    Wistar Institute, Room 358, 3601 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:19873-8. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi request reprint Ablation of insulin-producing neurons in flies: growth and diabetic phenotypes
    Eric J Rulifson
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center B300, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Science 296:1118-20. 2002
    ..Interestingly, the phenotype of flies lacking IPCs includes certain features of diabetes mellitus...
  2. ncbi request reprint Conserved mechanisms of glucose sensing and regulation by Drosophila corpora cardiaca cells
    Seung K Kim
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center B300, Stanford, California 94305 5329, USA
    Nature 431:316-20. 2004
    ..Thus, Drosophila CC cells are crucial regulators of glucose homeostasis and they use glucose-sensing and response mechanisms similar to islet cells...
  3. pmc The origin of islet-like cells in Drosophila identifies parallels to the vertebrate endocrine axis
    Shu Wang
    Wistar Institute, Room 358, 3601 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:19873-8. 2007
    ..This ontogenic-molecular concordance suggests that a rudimentary brain endocrine axis was present in the common ancestor of humans and flies, where it orchestrated the islet-like endocrine functions of insulin and glucagon biology...