DAVID ARNOLD RELMAN

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint New technologies, human-microbe interactions, and the search for previously unrecognized pathogens
    David A Relman
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:S254-8. 2002
  2. pmc Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota
    Chana Palmer
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e177. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Microbiology in the post-genomic era
    Duccio Medini
    Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, 53100 Siena, Italy
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:419-30. 2008
  4. pmc The human microbiome: ecosystem resilience and health
    David A Relman
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nutr Rev 70:S2-9. 2012
  5. pmc Cross-talk in the gut
    Jennifer E Dinalo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Genome Biol 10:203. 2009
  6. pmc Gene-expression patterns reveal underlying biological processes in Kawasaki disease
    Stephen J Popper
    Departments of Microbiology and Immunology, and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 8:R261. 2007
  7. pmc The temporal program of peripheral blood gene expression in the response of nonhuman primates to Ebola hemorrhagic fever
    Kathleen H Rubins
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 299 Campus Dr, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 8:R174. 2007
  8. pmc Phase variation and microevolution at homopolymeric tracts in Bordetella pertussis
    Emily B Gogol
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    BMC Genomics 8:122. 2007
  9. doi request reprint 'Til death do us part': coming to terms with symbiotic relationships. Forward
    David A Relman
    Stanford University, and VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Building 101, Room B4 185, 3801 Miranda Avenue 154T, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:721-4. 2008
  10. pmc Genome-wide responses of a pathogenic bacterium to its host
    David A Relman
    Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Clin Invest 110:1071-3. 2002

Detail Information

Publications59

  1. ncbi request reprint New technologies, human-microbe interactions, and the search for previously unrecognized pathogens
    David A Relman
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:S254-8. 2002
    ..These challenges and the goal of understanding microbial contributions to inflammatory disease may be addressed effectively through the thoughtful integration of modern technologies and clinical insight...
  2. pmc Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota
    Chana Palmer
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e177. 2007
    ..By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract...
  3. doi request reprint Microbiology in the post-genomic era
    Duccio Medini
    Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, 53100 Siena, Italy
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:419-30. 2008
    ....
  4. pmc The human microbiome: ecosystem resilience and health
    David A Relman
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nutr Rev 70:S2-9. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Cross-talk in the gut
    Jennifer E Dinalo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Genome Biol 10:203. 2009
    ..Modulation of host signaling by the products of microbial activity in the gut may affect weight gain and fat formation...
  6. pmc Gene-expression patterns reveal underlying biological processes in Kawasaki disease
    Stephen J Popper
    Departments of Microbiology and Immunology, and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 8:R261. 2007
    ..No etiologic agent(s) has been identified, and the processes that mediate formation of coronary artery aneurysms and abatement of fever following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) remain poorly understood...
  7. pmc The temporal program of peripheral blood gene expression in the response of nonhuman primates to Ebola hemorrhagic fever
    Kathleen H Rubins
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 299 Campus Dr, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 8:R174. 2007
    ..Infection with Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a fulminant and often fatal hemorrhagic fever. In order to improve our understanding of EBOV pathogenesis and EBOV-host interactions, we examined the molecular features of EBOV infection in vivo...
  8. pmc Phase variation and microevolution at homopolymeric tracts in Bordetella pertussis
    Emily B Gogol
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    BMC Genomics 8:122. 2007
    ..This limitation might be overcome by phase variation, as observed for other mucosal pathogens. One of the most common mechanisms of phase variation is reversible expansion or contraction of homopolymeric tracts (HPTs)...
  9. doi request reprint 'Til death do us part': coming to terms with symbiotic relationships. Forward
    David A Relman
    Stanford University, and VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Building 101, Room B4 185, 3801 Miranda Avenue 154T, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:721-4. 2008
    ..Here, David Relman discusses the selection of articles in this Focus issue, which reflects the exciting advances in our understanding of intimate partnerships between organisms and their environments...
  10. pmc Genome-wide responses of a pathogenic bacterium to its host
    David A Relman
    Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Clin Invest 110:1071-3. 2002
  11. pmc Stereotyped and specific gene expression programs in human innate immune responses to bacteria
    Jennifer C Boldrick
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:972-7. 2002
    ..Modulation of this host-response program by bacterial virulence mechanisms was an important source of variation in the response to different bacteria...
  12. ncbi request reprint Genomics and microbiology. Microbial forensics--"cross-examining pathogens"
    Craig A Cummings
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Science 296:1976-9. 2002
  13. pmc Rapid quantitative profiling of complex microbial populations
    Chana Palmer
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:e5. 2006
    ..This simple, rapid microarray procedure can be used to explore and systematically characterize complex microbial communities, such as those found within the human body...
  14. pmc Gene transcript abundance profiles distinguish Kawasaki disease from adenovirus infection
    Stephen J Popper
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 200:657-66. 2009
    ..As a result, diagnosis and critical therapies may be delayed...
  15. ncbi request reprint Genomewide analysis of the host response to malaria in Kenyan children
    Michael J Griffiths
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University, Oxford, UK
    J Infect Dis 191:1599-611. 2005
    ..The delineation of subjects on the basis of patterns of gene expression provides a molecular perspective of the host response to malaria and further functional insight into the underlying processes of pathogenesis...
  16. pmc Molecular analysis of the bacterial microbiota in the human stomach
    Elisabeth M Bik
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Fairchild Science Building, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:732-7. 2006
    ..The gastric microbiota may play important, as-yet-undiscovered roles in human health and disease...
  17. pmc Significant gene order and expression differences in Bordetella pertussis despite limited gene content variation
    Mary M Brinig
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:2375-82. 2006
    ..These findings have broad implications for host adaptation by microbial pathogens...
  18. ncbi request reprint Analysis of conserved non-rRNA genes of Tropheryma whipplei
    Matthias Maiwald
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Syst Appl Microbiol 26:3-12. 2003
    ..These data provide the basis for a more discriminatory typing method for T. whipplei...
  19. ncbi request reprint Assembly of the human intestinal microbiota
    Les Dethlefsen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:517-23. 2006
    ..We argue here that the unique history of each community and intrinsic temporal dynamics also influence the structure of human intestinal communities...
  20. pmc Genomic features of Bordetella parapertussis clades with distinct host species specificity
    Mary M Brinig
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 7:R81. 2006
    ..The disease process in sheep is not well understood, nor are the genetic and transcriptional differences that might provide the basis for host specificity among ovine and human strains...
  21. pmc Growth phase- and nutrient limitation-associated transcript abundance regulation in Bordetella pertussis
    Mari M Nakamura
    Department of Pediatrics Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Infect Immun 74:5537-48. 2006
    ..Growth phase and nutrient availability may serve as cues by which B. pertussis regulates virulence according to the stage of infection or the location within the human airway...
  22. ncbi request reprint The role of microbes in Crohn's disease
    Paul B Eckburg
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 44:256-62. 2007
    ..We review how microbes may participate in the pathogenesis of CD and how they may inappropriately activate the mucosal immune system in genetically predisposed individuals...
  23. pmc SmashCell: a software framework for the analysis of single-cell amplified genome sequences
    Eoghan D Harrington
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bioinformatics 26:2979-80. 2010
    ..It also manages the data created by these analyses and provides visualization methods for rapid analysis of the results...
  24. pmc Bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of 10 healthy individuals
    Elisabeth M Bik
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    ISME J 4:962-74. 2010
    ....
  25. pmc Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora
    Paul B Eckburg
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Room S 169, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford CA 94305 5107, USA
    Science 308:1635-8. 2005
    ..We discovered significant intersubject variability and differences between stool and mucosa community composition. Characterization of this immensely diverse ecosystem is the first step in elucidating its role in health and disease...
  26. ncbi request reprint Shedding light on microbial detection
    David A Relman
    Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif, USA
    N Engl J Med 349:2162-3. 2003
  27. pmc Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease
    Paul W Lepp
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6176-81. 2004
    ..Because they are potential alternative syntrophic partners, our finding of larger Treponema populations sites without archaea provides further support for this hypothesis...
  28. pmc Single-cell enumeration of an uncultivated TM7 subgroup in the human subgingival crevice
    Cleber C Ouverney
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:6294-8. 2003
    ..In addition, IO25 bacterial cells from periodontitis site samples were more abundant and fourfold longer than IO25 cells from healthy site samples...
  29. pmc Prevalence of bacteria of division TM7 in human subgingival plaque and their association with disease
    Mary M Brinig
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:1687-94. 2003
    ..These data suggest that this phylotype, and the TM7 bacterial division in general, may play a role in the multifactorial process leading to periodontitis...
  30. pmc Microbial prevalence, diversity and abundance in amniotic fluid during preterm labor: a molecular and culture-based investigation
    Daniel B Digiulio
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e3056. 2008
    ..However, molecular studies that define the diversity and abundance of microbes invading the amniotic cavity, and evaluate their clinical significance within a causal framework, are lacking...
  31. pmc The pervasive effects of an antibiotic on the human gut microbiota, as revealed by deep 16S rRNA sequencing
    Les Dethlefsen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 6:e280. 2008
    ..The rapid return to the pretreatment community composition is indicative of factors promoting community resilience, the nature of which deserves future investigation...
  32. pmc Broad-range bacterial detection and the analysis of unexplained death and critical illness
    Simo Nikkari
    Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 8:188-94. 2002
    ..In conclusion, known bacterial pathogens cause some critical illnesses and deaths that fail to be explained with traditional diagnostic methods...
  33. pmc Individuality and variation in gene expression patterns in human blood
    Adeline R Whitney
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1896-901. 2003
    ..These data help to define human individuality and provide a database with which disease-associated gene expression patterns can be compared...
  34. pmc Dissecting biological "dark matter" with single-cell genetic analysis of rare and uncultivated TM7 microbes from the human mouth
    Yann Marcy
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:11889-94. 2007
    ..This approach enables single-cell genetic analysis of any uncultivated minority member of a microbial community...
  35. pmc The host response to smallpox: analysis of the gene expression program in peripheral blood cells in a nonhuman primate model
    Kathleen H Rubins
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15190-5. 2004
    ..These results provide a detailed picture of the host transcriptional response during smallpox infection, and may help guide the development of diagnostic, therapeutic, and prophylactic strategies...
  36. ncbi request reprint Molecular identification of cyanobacteria associated with stromatolites from distinct geographical locations
    Brett A Neilan
    Departments of Geological and Environmental Sciences and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Astrobiology 2:271-80. 2002
    ..The data indicate that internal core samples of a stromatolite at least 10 years old can be successfully analyzed by DNA-based methods to identify preserved cyanobacteria...
  37. ncbi request reprint Early days: genomics and human responses to infection
    Minghsun Liu
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Grant S 169, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 9:312-9. 2006
    ..The resolution of these problems should lead to a better understanding of the dialogue between the host and pathogen...
  38. ncbi request reprint Cultivation of Tropheryma whipplei from cerebrospinal fluid
    Matthias Maiwald
    Department of Microbiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Infect Dis 188:801-8. 2003
    ..This first isolation of T. whipplei from CSF provides clear evidence of viable bacteria in the central nervous system in individuals with WD, even after prolonged antibiotic therapy...
  39. ncbi request reprint Building a better virus trap
    Clara Davis Long
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 25:535-8. 2007
    ..Although there will be technical hurdles to overcome, this concept might lead to benefits for both health and industry...
  40. pmc Host transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is controlled by virulence factors and indigenous intestinal microbiota
    Trevor D Lawley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Infect Immun 76:403-16. 2008
    ..This novel model should facilitate the study of host, pathogen, and intestinal microbiota factors that contribute to infectious disease transmission...
  41. doi request reprint Microbial threat lists: obstacles in the quest for biosecurity?
    Arturo Casadevall
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, New York 10461, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:149-54. 2010
    ....
  42. pmc Bordetella pertussis infection of primary human monocytes alters HLA-DR expression
    Jennifer A Shumilla
    Department of Pediatrics Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Infect Immun 72:1450-62. 2004
    ..These data demonstrate that B. pertussis utilizes several mechanisms to modulate HLA-DR expression...
  43. pmc Comparative analysis of viral gene expression programs during poxvirus infection: a transcriptional map of the vaccinia and monkeypox genomes
    Kathleen H Rubins
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2628. 2008
    ..Poxviruses engage in a complex and intricate dialogue with host cells as part of their strategy for replication. However, relatively little molecular detail is available with which to understand the mechanisms behind this dialogue...
  44. pmc Prevalence and diversity of microbes in the amniotic fluid, the fetal inflammatory response, and pregnancy outcome in women with preterm pre-labor rupture of membranes
    Daniel B Digiulio
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Am J Reprod Immunol 64:38-57. 2010
    ..The role played by microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) in preterm pre-labor rupture of membranes (pPROM) is inadequately characterized, in part because of reliance on cultivation-based methods...
  45. pmc Archaea and their potential role in human disease
    Paul B Eckburg
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Infect Immun 71:591-6. 2003
  46. pmc Linking microbial phylogeny to metabolic activity at the single-cell level by using enhanced element labeling-catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS
    Sebastian Behrens
    Department of Chemical Engineering and of Civil, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5429, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:3143-50. 2008
    ..Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities...
  47. ncbi request reprint An ecological and evolutionary perspective on human-microbe mutualism and disease
    Les Dethlefsen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 449:811-8. 2007
    ..In this way, looking to ecological and evolutionary principles might provide new strategies for restoring and maintaining human health...
  48. ncbi request reprint The importance of individuals and scale: moving towards single cell microbiology
    Les Dethlefsen
    Department of Microbiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Environ Microbiol 9:8-10. 2007
  49. ncbi request reprint Mining the natural world for new pathogens
    David A Relman
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 67:133-4. 2002
  50. pmc Metagenomic analysis of the human distal gut microbiome
    Steven R Gill
    Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 312:1355-9. 2006
    ..Thus, humans are superorganisms whose metabolism represents an amalgamation of microbial and human attributes...
  51. ncbi request reprint Patterns of host genome-wide gene transcript abundance in the peripheral blood of patients with acute dengue hemorrhagic fever
    Cameron P Simmons
    Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    J Infect Dis 195:1097-107. 2007
    ..To our knowledge, these data provide the first snapshot of gene-expression patterns in peripheral blood during acute dengue and suggest that DSS is associated with attenuation of selected aspects of the innate host response...
  52. ncbi request reprint Role of interleukin 6 in myocardial dysfunction of meningococcal septic shock
    Nazima Pathan
    Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, W2 1PG, London, UK
    Lancet 363:203-9. 2004
    ..During the sepsis-induced inflammatory process, specific factors are released that depress myocardial contractile function. We aimed to identify these mediators of myocardial depression in meningococcal septic shock...
  53. ncbi request reprint Lethal invasive cestodiasis in immunosuppressed patients
    Peter D Olson
    Parasitic Worms Division, Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    J Infect Dis 187:1962-6. 2003
    ..A prior report of this case nearly 30 years ago, based on tissue examination, had suggested that the parasite was a sparganum...
  54. ncbi request reprint Role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the binding of Bordetella pertussis to human monocytes
    Yoshio Ishibashi
    Department of Immunobiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Noshio, Kiyose, Tokyo 204 8588, Japan
    Cell Microbiol 4:825-33. 2002
    ..These results suggest that PI3-K and a tyrosine phosphorylated 60 kDa protein may be involved in this biologically important integrin signalling pathway...
  55. ncbi request reprint Human herpesvirus 8 and sarcoidosis
    David N Fredricks
    Clin Infect Dis 34:559-60. 2002
  56. pmc Exploring the potential of variola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques as a model for human smallpox
    Peter B Jahrling
    Headquarters, U S Army Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15196-200. 2004
    ..A more precise understanding of disease pathogenesis should provide targets for therapeutic intervention, to be used alone or in combination with inhibitors of variola virus replication...
  57. ncbi request reprint Sequencing and analysis of the genome of the Whipple's disease bacterium Tropheryma whipplei
    Stephen D Bentley
    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK
    Lancet 361:637-44. 2003
    ..The causative agent, Tropheryma whipplei, is a Gram-positive bacterium about which little is known. Our aim was to investigate the biology of this organism by generating and analysing the complete DNA sequence of its genome...
  58. doi request reprint Learning to appreciate our differences
    David A Relman
    J Infect Dis 198:4-5. 2008
  59. ncbi request reprint Identification of Cardiobacterium hominis by broad-range bacterial polymerase chain reaction analysis in a case of culture-negative endocarditis
    Simo Nikkari
    Palo Alto Vetrans Affairs Health Care System, Calif, USA
    Arch Intern Med 162:477-9. 2002
    ..This case demonstrates the usefulness of both the Steiner stain and broad-range direct molecular amplification as supplemental diagnostic tools in identification of otherwise unexplained infections...

Research Grants25

  1. Crohn's Disease: Microflora Analysis and Host Response
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..This combination of approaches offers opportunities for characterizing Crohn?s disease, and for examining the complex interactions of human host and microbial flora during states of health and disease. ..
  2. Optimization of a microfluidic device for single bacterial cell genomics
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  3. Host responses to smallpox and monkeypox
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  4. Analytical Tools for Comparative Microbial Genomics
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..In addition, the classification and phylogeny program will be offered as an on-line tool, and a Bordetella genome and CGH database will be built, maintained, and served to the community on-line. ..
  5. APPLIED GENOMICS IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Trainees are expected to graduate to academic faculty appointments or to research-oriented positions in federal government, public health or the biotechnology commercial sector. ..
  6. Optimization of a microfluidic device for single bacterial cell genomics
    DAVID ARNOLD RELMAN; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  7. Bordetella Response to Host Cues and Cell Signals
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..pertussis virulence mechanisms and physiological adaptations, as well as the complex interplay between this pathogen and the human host, which could, in turn, lead to the development of novel pertussis vaccines and therapeutics. ..
  8. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF SUBGINGIVAL MICROBIAL DIVERSITY
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  9. BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS AND MONOCYTE INTEGRIN RECEPTORS
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..3) To examine the effect of B. pertussis binding on the topological distribution of monocyte integrin receptors and associated signaling molecules. 4) To examine B. pertussis inhibition of antigen-dependent T- cell proliferation. ..
  10. Optimization of a microfluidic device for single bacterial cell genomics
    David Relman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....