Allan L Reiss

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Repetitive and self-injurious behaviors: associations with caudate volume in autism and fragile X syndrome
    Jason J Wolff
    Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, CB 3367, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 5:12. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint The behavioral neurogenetics of fragile X syndrome: analyzing gene-brain-behavior relationships in child developmental psychopathologies
    Allan L Reiss
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development and Behavioral Neurogenetics Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 15:927-68. 2003
  3. doi request reprint Childhood developmental disorders: an academic and clinical convergence point for psychiatry, neurology, psychology and pediatrics
    Allan L Reiss
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 50:87-98. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in cerebral volumes of 8-year-olds born preterm
    Allan L Reiss
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Pediatr 145:242-9. 2004
  5. pmc An experiment of nature: brain anatomy parallels cognition and behavior in Williams syndrome
    Allan L Reiss
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 24:5009-15. 2004
  6. pmc Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy
    Allan L Reiss
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2225. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Aberrant brain activation during gaze processing in boys with fragile X syndrome
    Christa Watson
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 65:1315-23. 2008
  8. pmc Reward processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 52:68-83. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Neuroanatomical differences in toddler boys with fragile x syndrome and idiopathic autism
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 68:295-305. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint Posttraumatic stress symptoms and brain function during a response-inhibition task: an fMRI study in youth
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Depress Anxiety 25:514-26. 2008

Detail Information

Publications122 found, 100 shown here

  1. pmc Repetitive and self-injurious behaviors: associations with caudate volume in autism and fragile X syndrome
    Jason J Wolff
    Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, CB 3367, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 5:12. 2013
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The behavioral neurogenetics of fragile X syndrome: analyzing gene-brain-behavior relationships in child developmental psychopathologies
    Allan L Reiss
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development and Behavioral Neurogenetics Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 15:927-68. 2003
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Childhood developmental disorders: an academic and clinical convergence point for psychiatry, neurology, psychology and pediatrics
    Allan L Reiss
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 50:87-98. 2009
    ..Such change is not only desirable but, in fact, necessary to bring about a truly innovative and more effective approach to treating disorders of the developing brain...
  4. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in cerebral volumes of 8-year-olds born preterm
    Allan L Reiss
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Pediatr 145:242-9. 2004
    ..These findings indicate that the sex of the very preterm newborn influences the mechanisms by which the developing brain is affected...
  5. pmc An experiment of nature: brain anatomy parallels cognition and behavior in Williams syndrome
    Allan L Reiss
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 24:5009-15. 2004
    ..These findings point to specific neuroanatomical correlates for the unique topography of cognitive and behavioral features associated with this disorder...
  6. pmc Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy
    Allan L Reiss
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2225. 2008
    ..The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy...
  7. doi request reprint Aberrant brain activation during gaze processing in boys with fragile X syndrome
    Christa Watson
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 65:1315-23. 2008
    ..To date (to our knowledge), this behavior in fraX has been studied only in female subjects, who show lesser degrees of gaze aversion...
  8. pmc Reward processing in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 52:68-83. 2013
    ..The objective of this study was to investigate the neural effects of an affective priming task designed to positively induce mood before reward processing in adolescents with and without BD...
  9. doi request reprint Neuroanatomical differences in toddler boys with fragile x syndrome and idiopathic autism
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 68:295-305. 2011
    ..Many conditions of atypical development can lead to autism, including fragile X syndrome (FXS), which is presently the most common known single-gene cause of autism...
  10. ncbi request reprint Posttraumatic stress symptoms and brain function during a response-inhibition task: an fMRI study in youth
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Depress Anxiety 25:514-26. 2008
    ..Insula activation correlated positively with PTSS severity. Diminished middle frontal activity and enhanced medial frontal activity during response-inhibition tasks may represent underlying neurofunctional markers of PTSS...
  11. ncbi request reprint More is not always better: increased fractional anisotropy of superior longitudinal fasciculus associated with poor visuospatial abilities in Williams syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 27:11960-5. 2007
    ..Together, these findings suggest a specific role of right SLF abnormality in visuospatial construction deficits in WS...
  12. doi request reprint Similar white matter aberrations in children with autism and their unaffected siblings: a diffusion tensor imaging study using tract-based spatial statistics
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 67:1052-60. 2010
    ..Recent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have indicated that white matter structure is aberrant in autism. To date, white matter structure has not been assessed in family members of children with autism...
  13. pmc Maternal history of reading difficulty is associated with reduced language-related gray matter in beginning readers
    Jessica M Black
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral, Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Neuroimage 59:3021-32. 2012
    ..These results help to guide future neuroimaging research focusing on environmental and genetic influences and provide new information that may help predict which child will develop dyslexia in the future...
  14. ncbi request reprint Increased temporal lobe gyrification in preterm children
    Shelli R Kesler
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Neuropsychologia 44:445-53. 2006
    ..Cortical development in the temporal lobe appears to be differentially vulnerable to preterm birth...
  15. ncbi request reprint Arithmetic ability and parietal alterations: a diffusion tensor imaging study in velocardiofacial syndrome
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 25:735-40. 2005
    ..Inferior parietal lobe white matter structural aberrations may contribute to reduced arithmetic ability in VCFS...
  16. pmc Early white-matter abnormalities of the ventral frontostriatal pathway in fragile X syndrome
    Brian W Haas
    Center of Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 51:593-9. 2009
    ..Fragile X syndrome is associated with cognitive deficits in inhibitory control and with abnormal neuronal morphology and development...
  17. ncbi request reprint Reduced parietal and visual cortical activation during global processing in Williams syndrome
    Dean Mobbs
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 49:433-8. 2007
    ..These preliminary results largely confirm previous research findings and neural models implicating neurodevelopmental abnormalities in extended subcortical and cortical visual systems in WS, most notably dorsal-stream pathways...
  18. pmc Abnormal amygdala and prefrontal cortex activation to facial expressions in pediatric bipolar disorder
    Amy S Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 51:821-31. 2012
    ..The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late phase of activation, suggesting different temporal characteristics of brain responses...
  19. pmc The fusiform face area is enlarged in Williams syndrome
    Golijeh Golarai
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 30:6700-12. 2010
    ..Thus, a larger FFA may play a role in face recognition proficiency among WS...
  20. ncbi request reprint Reduced basal forebrain and hippocampal activation during memory encoding in girls with fragile X syndrome
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford Brain Research Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroreport 15:1579-83. 2004
    ..This is the first study, to our knowledge, demonstrating functional deficits in FraX subjects in brain regions known to have the highest FMR1 transcription...
  21. ncbi request reprint Regional analysis of hippocampal activation during memory encoding and retrieval: fMRI study
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Hippocampus 13:164-74. 2003
    ..Finally, this study is the first to quantify the effects of susceptibility-induced signal loss on hippocampal activation and suggests that this artifact has significantly biased the interpretation of earlier fMRI studies...
  22. pmc Converging evidence for abnormalities of the prefrontal cortex and evaluation of midsagittal structures in pediatric posttraumatic stress disorder: an MRI study
    Victor G Carrion
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development, Stanford, CA, United States
    Psychiatry Res 172:226-34. 2009
    ..Voxel-based morphometry may help to corroborate and further localize data obtained by volume of interest methods in PTSD...
  23. pmc Amygdala and hippocampal volumes in Turner syndrome: a high-resolution MRI study of X-monosomy
    Shelli R Kesler
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, MC5719, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Neuropsychologia 42:1971-8. 2004
    ..Aberrant morphology in these regions may be related to the social cognition and memory deficits often experienced by individuals with TS. Further investigations of changes in medial temporal morphology associated with TS are warranted...
  24. pmc Brain volume reductions within multiple cognitive systems in male preterm children at age twelve
    Shelli R Kesler
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Pediatr 152:513-20, 520.e1. 2008
    ..To more precisely examine regional and subregional microstructural brain changes associated with preterm birth...
  25. ncbi request reprint Stress predicts brain changes in children: a pilot longitudinal study on youth stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and the hippocampus
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Pediatrics 119:509-16. 2007
    ..We hypothesized that cortisol volumes would predict hippocampal volume reduction in patients with posttraumatic symptoms...
  26. pmc Volumetric analysis of regional cerebral development in preterm children
    Shelli R Kesler
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Pediatr Neurol 31:318-25. 2004
    ..Lower birth weight and the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage may increase the risk for neuroanatomic abnormality...
  27. ncbi request reprint Frontostriatal dysfunction during response inhibition in Williams syndrome
    Dean Mobbs
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 62:256-61. 2007
    ..Here we explore the neural systems that mediate response inhibition in WS...
  28. doi request reprint Aberrant brain activation during a working memory task in psychotic major depression
    Amy Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 168:173-82. 2011
    ..The authors sought to better understand the neural circuitry associated with working memory deficits in psychotic major depression by examining brain function during an N-back task...
  29. pmc Reduced hippocampal activity in youth with posttraumatic stress symptoms: an FMRI study
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Pediatr Psychol 35:559-69. 2010
    ..Our goal is to investigate the function of the hippocampus in adolescents with PTSS during a memory processing task...
  30. ncbi request reprint Fronto-striatal dysfunction and potential compensatory mechanisms in male adolescents with fragile X syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 28:543-54. 2007
    ..We further show that these putative compensatory processes can be predicted by a complex interaction between genetic risk and neural function...
  31. ncbi request reprint Parietal attentional system aberrations during target detection in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: event-related fMRI evidence
    Leanne Tamm
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5717, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 163:1033-43. 2006
    ..The authors' goal was to investigate neural correlates of target detection dysfunction in ADHD using event-related fMRI...
  32. pmc Genomic imprinting effects of the X chromosome on brain morphology
    Jean François Lepage
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 33:8567-74. 2013
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint White matter development during childhood and adolescence: a cross-sectional diffusion tensor imaging study
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, and Department of Psychology, Children s Hospital of Orange County, Orange, CA 92868, USA
    Cereb Cortex 15:1848-54. 2005
    ..This typical developmental trajectory may be altered in individuals with disorders of development, cognition and behavior...
  34. pmc A volumetric study of parietal lobe subregions in Turner syndrome
    Wendy E Brown
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 46:607-9. 2004
    ..Structural differences in the parietal lobe are localized specifically to the anterior and superior parietal lobe and might be related to the visuospatial and visuomotor deficits associated with Turner syndrome...
  35. ncbi request reprint Cognitive correlates of white matter growth and stress hormones in female squirrel monkey adults
    David M Lyons
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5485, USA
    J Neurosci 24:3655-62. 2004
    ....
  36. pmc Selective alterations of white matter associated with visuospatial and sensorimotor dysfunction in turner syndrome
    Marie Holzapfel
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    J Neurosci 26:7007-13. 2006
    ..These complementary analyses provide evidence for alterations in white matter pathways that subserve affected and preserved cognitive functions in TS...
  37. pmc Insular cortex abnormalities in psychotic major depression: relationship to gender and psychotic symptoms
    Jeremy D Cohen
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, United States
    Neurosci Res 75:331-9. 2013
    ..Atypical insular morphometry may be related to the inability to distinguish between internally and externally generated sensory inputs characteristic of psychosis...
  38. pmc Impact of cognitive profile on social functioning in prepubescent females with Turner syndrome
    Jean François Lepage
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Child Neuropsychol 19:161-72. 2013
    ....
  39. pmc White matter structural differences in young children with type 1 diabetes: a diffusion tensor imaging study
    Tandy Aye
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Diabetes Care 35:2167-73. 2012
    ..To detect clinical correlates of cognitive abilities and white matter (WM) microstructural changes using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in young children with type 1 diabetes...
  40. doi request reprint Sex chromosomes and the brain: a study of neuroanatomy in XYY syndrome
    Daniel M Bryant
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 54:1149-56. 2012
    ..To assess global and regional brain matter variations associated with XYY syndrome by comparison with Klinefelter syndrome and typical development...
  41. pmc Effects of intranasal oxytocin on social anxiety in males with fragile X syndrome
    Scott S Hall
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 37:509-18. 2012
    ..Further double-blind placebo-controlled studies of OT, conducted in combination with behavioral treatment programs, may be warranted...
  42. ncbi request reprint Amygdalar activation associated with positive and negative facial expressions
    Tony T Yang
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroreport 13:1737-41. 2002
    ..These findings suggest a broader role for the amygdala in modulating the vigilance level during the perception of several negative and positive facial emotions...
  43. doi request reprint Longitudinal changes in intellectual development in children with Fragile X syndrome
    Scott S Hall
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Abnorm Child Psychol 36:927-39. 2008
    ..The results of this study suggest that slower learning contributes to the low and declining standardized IQ scores observed in children with FXS...
  44. ncbi request reprint The amygdala is enlarged in children but not adolescents with autism; the hippocampus is enlarged at all ages
    Cynthia Mills Schumann
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Neuroscience and the M I N D Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA
    J Neurosci 24:6392-401. 2004
    ..The cause of amygdala and hippocampal abnormalities in autism is currently unknown...
  45. ncbi request reprint Limbic and corpus callosum aberrations in adolescents with bipolar disorder: a tract-based spatial statistics analysis
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, MC 5795, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 66:238-44. 2009
    ..In this study, we investigated white matter structure in adolescents with familial bipolar disorder using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a whole brain analysis...
  46. pmc Resting-state functional connectivity in major depression: abnormally increased contributions from subgenual cingulate cortex and thalamus
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5235, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 62:429-37. 2007
    ..The goal of this study was to examine resting-state, default-mode network functional connectivity in subjects with major depression and in healthy controls...
  47. pmc Neuro-functional differences associated with arithmetic processing in Turner syndrome
    Shelli R Kesler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:849-56. 2006
    ..They must recruit additional brain regions during a relatively easy task and demonstrate a potentially inefficient response to increased task difficulty compared with controls...
  48. pmc Sex differences in brain activation elicited by humor
    Eiman Azim
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, and Program in Neuroscience, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:16496-501. 2005
    ..These results indicate sex-specific differences in neural response to humor with implications for sex-based disparities in the integration of cognition and emotion...
  49. ncbi request reprint Humor processing in children: influence of temperament, age and IQ
    Pascal Vrticka
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Neuropsychologia 51:2799-811. 2013
    ..Such data suggest that humor processing undergoes developmental changes and is moderated by higher IQ scores, both factors likely improving incongruity detection and resolution. ..
  50. pmc Influence of the X-chromosome on neuroanatomy: evidence from Turner and Klinefelter syndromes
    David S Hong
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford, California 94305, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    J Neurosci 34:3509-16. 2014
    ..We infer that sex chromosome gene expression directly influences brain structure in children during early stages of puberty, extending our understanding of genotype-phenotype mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain. ..
  51. pmc Neural correlates of humor detection and appreciation in children
    Michelle N Neely
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 32:1784-90. 2012
    ..By providing a crucial link in studying the neurodevelopment of humor processing across the lifespan, our findings contribute valuable information about the evolution of how children understand their world...
  52. pmc Effects of X-monosomy and X-linked imprinting on superior temporal gyrus morphology in Turner syndrome
    Shelli R Kesler
    Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 54:636-46. 2003
    ..The cognitive phenotype of TS involves preservation of verbal skills with visuospatial functioning deficits. The superior temporal gyrus (STG), which is involved in language capacities, has not been investigated in TS...
  53. ncbi request reprint From research to practice: teacher and pediatrician awareness of phenotypic traits in neurogenetic syndromes
    Tammy H Lee
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Am J Ment Retard 110:100-6. 2005
    ....
  54. ncbi request reprint Factors associated with parenting stress in mothers of children with fragile X syndrome
    Cindy Johnston
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 24:267-75. 2003
    ..Determining the relative contribution of factors associated with stress will assist in the development of interventions to improve parental well-being in mothers of children with FraX...
  55. doi request reprint Gender differences in the mesocorticolimbic system during computer game-play
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 42:253-8. 2008
    ..These gender differences may help explain why males are more attracted to, and more likely to become "hooked" on video games than females...
  56. pmc Decreased prefrontal cortical volume associated with increased bedtime cortisol in traumatized youth
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 68:491-3. 2010
    ..The purpose of this study was to investigate prefrontal cortex (PFC) volumes in youth with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and explore the relationship between cortisol secretion and PFC volumes...
  57. pmc Cholinergic dysfunction in fragile X syndrome and potential intervention: a preliminary 1H MRS study
    Shelli R Kesler
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5795, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 149:403-7. 2009
    ....
  58. ncbi request reprint Physiological correlates of social avoidance behavior in children and adolescents with fragile x syndrome
    Scott S Hall
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 48:320-9. 2009
    ..To date, almost all studies in this area have been confounded by inclusion of task demands in addition to social demands...
  59. pmc Functional neuroanatomy of spatial orientation processing in Turner syndrome
    Shelli R Kesler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cereb Cortex 14:174-80. 2004
    ..Activation, and possibly deactivation, deficits in these areas may be responsible for the visuospatial deficits observed in females with TS...
  60. ncbi request reprint Effect of head orientation on gaze processing in fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus
    Natalie M Pageler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 20:318-29. 2003
    ..Together, these findings suggest that head orientation has a significant effect on gaze processing and these effects are manifest not only in the STS, but also the FG...
  61. pmc Outcome measures for clinical trials in fragile X syndrome
    Elizabeth Berry-Kravis
    Departments of Pediatrics, Neurological Sciences, and Biochemistry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA MIND Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Radiology and Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 34:508-22. 2013
    ..To address this problem, the National Institutes of Health convened a meeting of leading scientists and clinicians with the goal of identifying and standardizing outcome measures for use as potential endpoints in clinical trials in FXS...
  62. pmc Volumetric reductions in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in adolescents with bipolar I disorder
    Manpreet K Singh
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Bipolar Disord 14:585-96. 2012
    ..The goal of this study was to examine whether youth with bipolar I disorder who recently experienced their first episode of mania are characterized by brain volumetric abnormalities...
  63. pmc Genomic imprinting effects on cognitive and social abilities in prepubertal girls with Turner syndrome
    Jean François Lepage
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, MC 5795, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 97:E460-4. 2012
    ..However, due to small and heterogeneous samples, inconsistent results have emerged from these studies...
  64. doi request reprint The brain basis of the phonological deficit in dyslexia is independent of IQ
    Hiroko Tanaka
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Psychol Sci 22:1442-51. 2011
    ..These results converge with behavioral evidence indicating that, regardless of IQ, poor readers have similar kinds of reading difficulties in relation to phonological processing...
  65. pmc Reduced functional connectivity during working memory in Turner syndrome
    Signe Bray
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Cereb Cortex 21:2471-81. 2011
    ..These findings suggest that structural brain abnormalities in TS affect not only regional activity but also the functional interactions between regions and that this has important consequences for behavior...
  66. pmc Neural systems predicting long-term outcome in dyslexia
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:361-6. 2011
    ..Brain measures that predict future behavioral outcomes (neuroprognosis) may be more accurate, in some cases, than available behavioral measures...
  67. pmc Psychosocial functioning and social cognitive processing in girls with Turner syndrome
    David S Hong
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 32:512-20. 2011
    ..Difficulties in social functioning have also been increasingly identified in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine elements of social competence and cognition in a pre-estrogen population of girls with TS...
  68. ncbi request reprint COMT genotype predicts longitudinal cognitive decline and psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome
    Doron Gothelf
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, California 94305 5795, USA
    Nat Neurosci 8:1500-2. 2005
    ..The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a promising model for identifying biomarkers related to the development of schizophrenia...
  69. pmc Changes in frontal-parietal activation and math skills performance following adaptive number sense training: preliminary results from a pilot study
    Shelli R Kesler
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Neuropsychol Rehabil 21:433-54. 2011
    ....
  70. pmc Chronological age, but not FMRP levels, predicts neuropsychological performance in girls with fragile X syndrome
    Amy A Lightbody
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 141:468-72. 2006
    ..In contrast, the relative deficits in spatial and verbal abilities of these girls did not appear to increase with age, suggesting that these abilities may be spared...
  71. ncbi request reprint Prediction of children's reading skills using behavioral, functional, and structural neuroimaging measures
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Behav Neurosci 121:602-13. 2007
    ..Results were validated using cross-validation methods. These findings suggest that neuroimaging methods may be useful in enhancing the early identification of children at risk for poor decoding and reading skills...
  72. ncbi request reprint Diurnal salivary cortisol in pediatric posttraumatic stress disorder
    Victor G Carrion
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 51:575-82. 2002
    ..Additional information on basal cortisol levels in children exposed to trauma and experiencing PTSD symptoms may contribute to the understanding of the role of this axis in PTSD...
  73. pmc NIRS-based hyperscanning reveals increased interpersonal coherence in superior frontal cortex during cooperation
    Xu Cui
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 59:2430-7. 2012
    ..This study demonstrates the use of NIRS-based hyperscanning in studies of social interaction in a naturalistic environment...
  74. doi request reprint Contribution of executive functions to visuospatial difficulties in prepubertal girls with Turner syndrome
    Jean François Lepage
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University, California, USA
    Dev Neuropsychol 36:988-1002. 2011
    ..These results suggest that executive dysfunctions observed in TS contribute to their visuospatial impairments...
  75. pmc Speeded near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) response detection
    Xu Cui
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e15474. 2010
    ..We found that the latency to decode a change in behavioral state can be reduced by 50% (from 4.8 s to 2.4 s), which will enhance the feasibility of NIRS for real-time applications...
  76. ncbi request reprint Regional differences of the prefrontal cortex in pediatric PTSD: an MRI study
    Katherine A Richert
    Stanford Early Life Stress Research Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5719, USA
    Depress Anxiety 23:17-25. 2006
    ..Furthermore, the neuroanatomy of the dorsal PFC may influence the degree of functional impairment experienced by children with PTSD symptoms...
  77. ncbi request reprint Voxel-based morphometry elucidates structural neuroanatomy of high-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome
    Hower Kwon
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 46:760-4. 2004
    ....
  78. pmc Neuroanatomical abnormalities in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Amy Garrett
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 47:1321-8. 2008
    ..However, findings are not always consistent, perhaps because of heterogeneous subject samples. Studying youths with documented familial ADHD provides an opportunity to examine a more homogeneous population...
  79. pmc Autism in fragile X syndrome: a category mistake?
    Scott S Hall
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 49:921-33. 2010
    ..To determine whether this classification is appropriate, we examined the profiles of autistic behaviors shown by boys and girls with FXS...
  80. pmc Default-mode network activity distinguishes Alzheimer's disease from healthy aging: evidence from functional MRI
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:4637-42. 2004
    ..Finally, a goodness-of-fit analysis applied at the individual subject level suggests that activity in the default-mode network may ultimately prove a sensitive and specific biomarker for incipient AD...
  81. ncbi request reprint White matter structure in autism: preliminary evidence from diffusion tensor imaging
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 55:323-6. 2004
    ..Prior studies have suggested that abnormal connections between brain regions important for social cognition may contribute to the social deficits seen in autism...
  82. ncbi request reprint Functional brain activation during arithmetic processing in females with fragile X Syndrome is related to FMR1 protein expression
    Susan M Rivera
    Department of Psychology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 16:206-18. 2002
    ..More broadly, this investigation demonstrates a unique bridging of cognitive and molecular neuroscience and represents a useful approach for the study of brain development and function...
  83. pmc Brain development in Turner syndrome: a magnetic resonance imaging study
    Wendy E Brown
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Psychiatry Res 116:187-96. 2002
    ..Further investigation into the possible role of genomic imprinting is therefore warranted...
  84. ncbi request reprint The contribution of novel brain imaging techniques to understanding the neurobiology of mental retardation and developmental disabilities
    Doron Gothelf
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5719, USA
    Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 11:331-9. 2005
    ....
  85. ncbi request reprint Corpus callosum and posterior fossa development in monozygotic females: a morphometric MRI study of Turner syndrome
    Susannah L Fryer
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 45:320-4. 2003
    ..Further, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia associated with TS agrees with literature that suggests the posterior fossa as a region prone to structural alterations in the face of early developmental insult...
  86. pmc Persistent default-mode network connectivity during light sedation
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5235, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 29:839-47. 2008
    ..We hypothesize that focal reductions in DMN connectivity, as shown here in the posterior cingulate cortex, may represent a stable correlate of reduced consciousness...
  87. ncbi request reprint White matter tract alterations in fragile X syndrome: preliminary evidence from diffusion tensor imaging
    Naama Barnea-Goraly
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 118:81-8. 2003
    ....
  88. pmc Region-specific alterations in brain development in one- to three-year-old boys with fragile X syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:9335-9. 2010
    ..The creation of an early and accurate human brain phenotype for FXS in humans will significantly improve our capability to detect whether new disease-specific treatments can "rescue" the FXS phenotype in affected individuals...
  89. ncbi request reprint Neuroanatomic variation in monozygotic twin pairs discordant for the narrow phenotype for autism
    Wendy R Kates
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 161:539-46. 2004
    ..The authors examined the relationship of twin pair differences in clinical phenotype to differences in neuroanatomic phenotype...
  90. ncbi request reprint A developmental fMRI study of the Stroop color-word task
    Nancy E Adleman
    Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 16:61-75. 2002
    ..Findings from this study, the first developmental fMRI investigation of the Stroop interference task, provide a template with which normal development and neurodevelopmental disorders of prefrontal cortex function can be assessed...
  91. ncbi request reprint Psychiatric disorders and behavioral problems in children with velocardiofacial syndrome: usefulness as phenotypic indicators of schizophrenia risk
    Carl Feinstein
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 51:312-8. 2002
    ..Identification of a specific behavioral (psychiatric) phenotype in childhood VCFS offers the potential for elucidating the symptomatic precursors of adult onset schizophrenia...
  92. ncbi request reprint Genetic and environmental influences on the cognitive outcomes of children with fragile X syndrome
    Jennifer Dyer-Friedman
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 41:237-44. 2002
    ..To measure the genetic and environmental factors influencing the cognitive outcomes in children with fragile X, a common genetic disorder causing cognitive impairments...
  93. ncbi request reprint Relating semantic and episodic memory systems
    Vinod Menon
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 13:261-5. 2002
    ..Here we provide direct evidence for a functional relationship between these two memory systems by showing that left lateral temporal lobe regions involved in semantic memory play an important role in accurate episodic memory retrieval...
  94. pmc The feasibility of detecting neuropsychologic and neuroanatomic effects of type 1 diabetes in young children
    Tandy Aye
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Diabetes Care 34:1458-62. 2011
    ..To determine if frequent exposures to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia during early childhood lead to neurocognitive deficits and changes in brain anatomy...
  95. ncbi request reprint Here's looking at you, kid: neural systems underlying face and gaze processing in fragile X syndrome
    Amy S Garrett
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 61:281-8. 2004
    ..In this study, we analyzed brain activation in response to face and gaze stimuli to better understand neural functioning associated with social perception in fraX...
  96. pmc Functional connectivity in the resting brain: a network analysis of the default mode hypothesis
    Michael D Greicius
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:253-8. 2003
    ..Our findings also provide insight into how this network is modulated by task demands and what functions it might subserve...
  97. ncbi request reprint Maturation of brain function associated with response inhibition
    Leanne Tamm
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5717, USA
    J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 41:1231-8. 2002
    ....
  98. ncbi request reprint Investigation of neuroanatomical differences between autism and Asperger syndrome
    Linda J Lotspeich
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 61:291-8. 2004
    ....
  99. pmc Aberrant brain activation during a response inhibition task in adolescent eating disorder subtypes
    James Lock
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 168:55-64. 2011
    ....
  100. pmc The impact of spermine synthase (SMS) mutations on brain morphology
    Shelli R Kesler
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, MC5795, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Neurogenetics 10:299-305. 2009
    ..Disruption of SMS function may negatively affect regional brain volumes that subserve cognitive and motor abilities. This research provides valuable insight into the effects of polyamine function on brain development...