Jianghong Rao

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Self-illuminating quantum dot conjugates for in vivo imaging
    Min Kyung So
    Molecular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 24:339-43. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Fluorescence imaging in vivo: recent advances
    Jianghong Rao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:17-25. 2007
  3. pmc HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots
    Min Kyung So
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, P093, Mail code 5484, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 374:419-23. 2008
  4. pmc Self-luminescing BRET-FRET near-infrared dots for in vivo lymph-node mapping and tumour imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Commun 3:1193. 2012
  5. pmc A biocompatible condensation reaction for controlled assembly of nanostructures in living cells
    Gaolin Liang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Chem 2:54-60. 2010
  6. pmc Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells
    Shuan Lin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Biotechnol 7:67. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Shedding light on tumors using nanoparticles
    Jianghong Rao
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    ACS Nano 2:1984-6. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Visualizing RNA splicing in vivo
    Gayatri Gowrishankar
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Mol Biosyst 3:301-7. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Quantum dot bioconjugates for in vitro diagnostics & in vivo imaging
    Yun Xing
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cancer Biomark 4:307-19. 2008
  10. doi request reprint Facile synthesis, silanization, and biodistribution of biocompatible quantum dots
    Nan Ma
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS Department of Radiology Stanford University Lucas Center, 1201 Welch Road Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Small 6:1520-8. 2010

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications53

  1. ncbi request reprint Self-illuminating quantum dot conjugates for in vivo imaging
    Min Kyung So
    Molecular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 24:339-43. 2006
    ..Compared with existing quantum dots, self-illuminating quantum dot conjugates have greatly enhanced sensitivity in small animal imaging, with an in vivo signal-to-background ratio of > 10(3) for 5 pmol of conjugate...
  2. ncbi request reprint Fluorescence imaging in vivo: recent advances
    Jianghong Rao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:17-25. 2007
    ..Further emerging developments are aiming to achieve high-resolution, multimodality and lifetime-based in vivo fluorescence imaging...
  3. pmc HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots
    Min Kyung So
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, P093, Mail code 5484, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 374:419-23. 2008
    ..Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging...
  4. pmc Self-luminescing BRET-FRET near-infrared dots for in vivo lymph-node mapping and tumour imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Commun 3:1193. 2012
    ..Our results demonstrate that these new nanoparticles are well suited to in vivo imaging applications such as lymph-node mapping and cancer imaging...
  5. pmc A biocompatible condensation reaction for controlled assembly of nanostructures in living cells
    Gaolin Liang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Chem 2:54-60. 2010
    ..This intracellular condensation process enabled the imaging of the proteolytic activity of furin...
  6. pmc Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells
    Shuan Lin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Biotechnol 7:67. 2007
    ..In this report, we aimed to evaluate in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells labeled with Qtracker delivered quantum dots (QDs)...
  7. doi request reprint Shedding light on tumors using nanoparticles
    Jianghong Rao
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    ACS Nano 2:1984-6. 2008
    ..This versatile nanoplatform promises more efficient delivery of payloads to tumors for improving cancer detection and treatment...
  8. ncbi request reprint Visualizing RNA splicing in vivo
    Gayatri Gowrishankar
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Mol Biosyst 3:301-7. 2007
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Quantum dot bioconjugates for in vitro diagnostics & in vivo imaging
    Yun Xing
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cancer Biomark 4:307-19. 2008
    ..In addition, we will discuss the making of a new class of QDs--the self-illuminating QDs and their in vivo imaging and sensing applications. We will conclude with the issues and perspectives on QDs as in vivo imaging probes...
  10. doi request reprint Facile synthesis, silanization, and biodistribution of biocompatible quantum dots
    Nan Ma
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS Department of Radiology Stanford University Lucas Center, 1201 Welch Road Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Small 6:1520-8. 2010
    ..82% ID g(-1)), blood retention (15.0% ID g(-1)), and partial renal clearance. Overall, this straightforward synthetic strategy paves the way for routine and customized synthesis of silica-coated QDs for biological use...
  11. pmc Immobilizing reporters for molecular imaging of the extracellular microenvironment in living animals
    Zuyong Xia
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, California 94035 5484, United States
    ACS Chem Biol 6:1117-26. 2011
    ..Our results show that the in vivo immobilization of reporters can be used as a general strategy for probing the local extracellular microenvironment...
  12. pmc Multiplex detection of protease activity with quantum dot nanosensors prepared by intein-mediated specific bioconjugation
    Zuyong Xia
    Biophysics Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Anal Chem 80:8649-55. 2008
    ..The suitability of these nanosensors for a multiplex protease assay has also been shown...
  13. pmc Particle size, surface coating, and PEGylation influence the biodistribution of quantum dots in living mice
    Meike L Schipper
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Small 5:126-34. 2009
    ..Renal excretion of small QDs and slowing of RES clearance by PEGylation or peptide surface coating are encouraging steps toward the use of modified QDs for imaging living subjects...
  14. doi request reprint Imaging target mRNA and siRNA-mediated gene silencing in vivo with ribozyme-based reporters
    Min Kyung So
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Biophysics, Cancer Biology Programs, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Chembiochem 9:2682-91. 2008
    ..This new ribozyme-based RNA reporter system should open up new avenues for in vivo RNA imaging and direct imaging of siRNA inhibition...
  15. pmc Positron emission tomography imaging of drug-induced tumor apoptosis with a caspase-triggered nanoaggregation probe
    Bin Shen
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5484 USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 52:10511-4. 2013
    ..Enhanced retention of the (18)F activity in apoptotic tumors is achieved through intramolecular macrocyclization and in situ aggregation upon caspase-3 activation (see picture)...
  16. doi request reprint Cancer therapy: development of novel tumor-targeted theranostic nanoparticles activated by membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases for combined cancer magnetic resonance imaging and therapy (small 3/2014)
    Celina Ansari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 725 Welch Road, Rm 1665, Stanford, CA, 94305 5614, USA
    Small 10:417. 2014
    ..E. Daldrup-Link, and co-workers describe on page 566, this tumor specific drug release reduces the side-effects of cancer therapy. The magnetic core of the nanoparticles allows for MRI monitoring of their distribution in the body. ..
  17. pmc Synthesis of ligand-functionalized water-soluble [18F]YF3 nanoparticles for PET imaging
    Liqin Xiong
    Stanford Molecular Imaging Program MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Nanoscale 5:3253-6. 2013
    ..18)F-labeled YF3 nanoparticles displayed high stability in mouse and human serum, and their application for mapping lymph nodes in live rats after local injection has also been demonstrated...
  18. pmc Real-time imaging of Rab5 activity using a prequenched biosensor
    Ke Zhan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, California 94305 5484, United States
    ACS Chem Biol 6:692-9. 2011
    ..This novel method should enable imaging of the biological process in which Rab5 activity is regulated in various cellular systems...
  19. pmc Improved QD-BRET conjugates for detection and imaging
    Yun Xing
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 372:388-94. 2008
    ..Stable QD-BRET probes should further facilitate their applications for both in vitro testing as well as in vivo cell tracking studies...
  20. ncbi request reprint A bioluminogenic substrate for in vivo imaging of beta-lactamase activity
    Hequan Yao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Biophysics, Cancer Biology Programs, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 46:7031-4. 2007
  21. pmc Biosensing and imaging based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer
    Zuyong Xia
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 20:37-44. 2009
    ..Future development of new BRET acceptors should further expand the multiplexing capability of BRET and improve its applicability and sensitivity for in vivo imaging applications...
  22. ncbi request reprint HaloTag protein-mediated site-specific conjugation of bioluminescent proteins to quantum dots
    Yan Zhang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 45:4936-40. 2006
  23. ncbi request reprint Creating self-illuminating quantum dot conjugates
    Min Kyung So
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Protoc 1:1160-4. 2006
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Rapid point-of-care detection of the tuberculosis pathogen using a BlaC-specific fluorogenic probe
    Hexin Xie
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nat Chem 4:802-9. 2012
    ..This system offers the opportunity for the rapid, accurate detection of very low numbers of Mtb for the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis in sputum and other specimens...
  25. pmc CNOB/ChrR6, a new prodrug enzyme cancer chemotherapy
    Steve H Thorne
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 8:333-41. 2009
    ..This feature may simplify exploration of barriers to the penetration of MCHB in tumors and their amelioration...
  26. ncbi request reprint A self-assembled quantum dot probe for detecting beta-lactamase activity
    Chenjie Xu
    Biophysics, Cancer Biology, and Molecular Imaging Programs, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 344:931-5. 2006
    ..Our final quantum dot probe, assembled with QD605 and 1:1 mixture of biotin and a Cy5-labeled lactam, can be activated by 32microg/mL of beta-lactamase with 4-fold increase in the fluorescence emission...
  27. pmc Activatable oligomerizable imaging agents for photoacoustic imaging of furin-like activity in living subjects
    Anca Dragulescu-Andrasi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 135:11015-22. 2013
    ..This probe could report enzyme activity in living subjects at depths significantly greater than fluorescence imaging probes and has potential for molecular imaging in deep tumors. ..
  28. ncbi request reprint Chemical labeling of protein in living cells
    Anca Dragulescu-Andrasi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Chembiochem 8:1099-101. 2007
  29. pmc In vivo bioluminescence imaging of furin activity in breast cancer cells using bioluminogenic substrates
    Anca Dragulescu-Andrasi
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:1660-6. 2009
    ..Direct imaging of furin activity may facilitate the study of furin function in tumorigenicity and the discovery of new drugs for furin-targeted cancer therapy...
  30. ncbi request reprint microPET-based biodistribution of quantum dots in living mice
    Meike L Schipper
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, East 150 Clark Center, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1511-8. 2007
    ..This study evaluates the quantitative biodistribution of commercially available CdSe quantum dots (QD) in mice...
  31. pmc Protease-modulated cellular uptake of quantum dots
    Yan Zhang
    Biophysics, Cancer Biology, and Molecular Imaging Programs, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Nano Lett 6:1988-92. 2006
    ..This enzyme-modulated cellular uptake of QDs may be applied to other nanoparticles for biological imaging and selective drug delivery into tumor cells...
  32. pmc A selenium analogue of firefly D-luciferin with red-shifted bioluminescence emission
    Nicholas R Conley
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, CA 94305 5080, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 51:3350-3. 2012
    ..It has a red-shifted bioluminescence emission maximum at 600 nm and is suitable for bioluminescence imaging studies in living subjects...
  33. pmc Combining SELEX screening and rational design to develop light-up fluorophore-RNA aptamer pairs for RNA tagging
    Jungjoon Lee
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1210 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 5:1065-74. 2010
    ..This study demonstrates the value of combining in vitro SELEX and E. coli fluorescence screening with rational modifications in discovering and optimizing new fluorogen-RNA aptamer labeling pairs...
  34. ncbi request reprint Quantum dot/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer based highly sensitive detection of proteases
    Hequan Yao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Biophysics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 46:4346-9. 2007
  35. ncbi request reprint Detection of mRNA in mammalian cells with a split ribozyme reporter
    Sumitaka Hasegawa
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Chembiochem 7:925-8. 2006
  36. pmc Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo
    Deju Ye
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA 2
    Nat Chem 6:519-26. 2014
    ..This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo. ..
  37. pmc Efficient method for site-specific 18F-labeling of biomolecules using the rapid condensation reaction between 2-cyanobenzothiazole and cysteine
    Jongho Jeon
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 23:1902-8. 2012
    ..This strategy should provide a general approach for efficient and site-specific (18)F-labeling of various peptides and proteins for in vivo molecular imaging applications...
  38. pmc A strategy to enhance the binding affinity of fluorophore-aptamer pairs for RNA tagging with neomycin conjugation
    Jongho Jeon
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Chem Commun (Camb) 48:10034-6. 2012
    ..Conjugates were fluorescently activated by binding to RNA aptamers and exhibited greater than 250-400 fold enhancement in binding affinity relative to corresponding unconjugated fluorophores...
  39. pmc Bioluminescent nanosensors for protease detection based upon gold nanoparticle-luciferase conjugates
    Young Pil Kim
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Chem Commun (Camb) 46:76-8. 2010
    ..The bioluminescent emission from luciferase was efficiently quenched by Au NPs, but significantly recovered after the proteolytic cleavage...
  40. ncbi request reprint Semiconductor quantum dots for biosensing and in vivo imaging
    Yun Xing
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Nanobioscience 8:4-12. 2009
    ..We conclude with a discussion on the issues and perspectives on QDs as biosensing probes and in vivo imaging agents...
  41. ncbi request reprint Modulating the splicing activity of Tetrahymena ribozyme via RNA self-assembly
    Sumitaka Hasegawa
    Biophysics Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    FEBS Lett 580:1592-6. 2006
    ..The splicing efficiency was dependent on the length of appending nucleotides...
  42. pmc Near-infrared light emitting luciferase via biomineralization
    Nan Ma
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 132:6884-5. 2010
    ..This is the first study to form dual functional bioinorganic hybrid nanostructures via active enzyme-templated synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials...
  43. ncbi request reprint Cell-permeable near-infrared fluorogenic substrates for imaging beta-lactamase activity
    Bengang Xing
    Department of Radiology, Biophysics, Bio X, Cancer Biology, and Molecular Imaging Programs at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 127:4158-9. 2005
    ..This new type of fluorogenic probe may also be applied to image gene expression in living animals...
  44. pmc Real-time imaging of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the liver of live animals for drug-toxicity testing
    Adam J Shuhendler
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA 2
    Nat Biotechnol 32:373-80. 2014
    ..We detected dose-dependent ROS and RNS activity in the liver within minutes of drug challenge, which preceded histological changes, protein nitration and DNA double-strand-break induction. ..
  45. pmc Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice
    Kanyi Pu
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA 2
    Nat Nanotechnol 9:233-9. 2014
    ..These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes...
  46. pmc Superresolution imaging of targeted proteins in fixed and living cells using photoactivatable organic fluorophores
    Hsiao lu D Lee
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 132:15099-101. 2010
    ....
  47. doi request reprint Strategies for in vivo imaging of enzyme activity: an overview and recent advances
    Andrew Razgulin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, California 94305 5484, USA
    Chem Soc Rev 40:4186-216. 2011
    ..Recent advances in combining multiple modalities to imaging enzyme activity in living subjects are also highlighted (255 references)...
  48. ncbi request reprint How molecular imaging is speeding up antiangiogenic drug development
    Weibo Cai
    The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1201 Welch Road, P095, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 5:2624-33. 2006
    ..Molecular imaging has enormous potential in improving the efficiency of the drug development process, including the specific area of antiangiogenic drugs...
  49. pmc Development of novel tumor-targeted theranostic nanoparticles activated by membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases for combined cancer magnetic resonance imaging and therapy
    Celina Ansari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 725 Welch Road, Rm 1665, Stanford, CA, 94305 5614, USA
    Small 10:566-75, 417. 2014
    ..This novel approach holds the potential to significantly improve targeted cancer therapies, and ultimately enable personalized therapy regimens. ..
  50. pmc Iron administration before stem cell harvest enables MR imaging tracking after transplantation
    Aman Khurana
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 725 Welch Rd, Room 1665, Stanford, CA 94305 5654 Department of Communication and Statistics and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif
    Radiology 269:186-97. 2013
    ..To determine whether intravenous ferumoxytol can be used to effectively label mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vivo and can be used for tracking of stem cell transplants...
  51. ncbi request reprint Single-cell detection of trans-splicing ribozyme in vivo activity
    Sumitaka Hasegawa
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 126:7158-9. 2004
    ....
  52. pmc Imaging Tetrahymena ribozyme splicing activity in single live mammalian cells
    Sumitaka Hasegawa
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1770, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:14892-6. 2003
    ..Our work has provided a new reporter system that allows high-throughput screening with flow cytometry of single living mammalian cells for a direct and facile in vivo selection of desired ribozyme variants...
  53. ncbi request reprint Novel fluorogenic substrates for imaging beta-lactamase gene expression
    Wenzhong Gao
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 1770, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 125:11146-7. 2003
    ..These new fluorogenic substrates should find uses in clinical diagnostics and facilitate the applications of beta-lactamase as a biosensor...

Research Grants4

  1. A Unified Reporter Gene for Multi-Modality Imaging
    Jianghong Rao; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. QD-BRET nanosensors for protease detection and imaging
    Jianghong Rao; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..A sophisticated understanding of the differences of enzyme activity between tumor and normal tissues in living subjects will advance our understanding of cancer metastasis and help develop antimetastasis therapy. ..
  3. QD-BRET nanosensors for protease detection and imaging
    Jianghong Rao; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..A sophisticated understanding of the differences of enzyme activity between tumor and normal tissues in living subjects will advance our understanding of cancer metastasis and help develop antimetastasis therapy. ..