Robert M Pringle

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Herbivore-initiated interaction cascades and their modulation by productivity in an African savanna
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:193-7. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Elephants as agents of habitat creation for small vertebrates at the patch scale
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 89:26-33. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Coupling of canopy and understory food webs by ground-dwelling predators
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:1328-37. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Indirect effects of large herbivores on snakes in an African savanna
    Douglas J McCauley
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 87:2657-63. 2006
  5. pmc Colloquium paper: where does biodiversity go from here? A grim business-as-usual forecast and a hopeful portfolio of partial solutions
    Paul R Ehrlich
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:11579-86. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint When agendas collide: human welfare and biological conservation
    Kai M A Chan
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conserv Biol 21:59-68. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Breakdown of an ant-plant mutualism follows the loss of large herbivores from an African savanna
    Todd M Palmer
    Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Science 319:192-5. 2008

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Herbivore-initiated interaction cascades and their modulation by productivity in an African savanna
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:193-7. 2007
    ..Hence, the strongest indirect effects (and thus, the greatest risks to ecosystem integrity after large mammals are extirpated) are likely to occur in low-productivity habitats...
  2. ncbi request reprint Elephants as agents of habitat creation for small vertebrates at the patch scale
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 89:26-33. 2008
    ..Such powerful megaherbivore-initiated interactions suggest that anthropogenic changes in large-mammal densities will have important cascading consequences for ecological communities...
  3. doi request reprint Coupling of canopy and understory food webs by ground-dwelling predators
    Robert M Pringle
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:1328-37. 2008
    ..Although prey subsidies in vertically structured terrestrial habitats have received little attention, they are likely to be common and important to food-web organization...
  4. ncbi request reprint Indirect effects of large herbivores on snakes in an African savanna
    Douglas J McCauley
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 87:2657-63. 2006
    ..This is the first empirical demonstration of the indirect effects of large herbivores on snake abundance and presents an interesting example of how the influence of dominant and keystone species can move through a food web...
  5. pmc Colloquium paper: where does biodiversity go from here? A grim business-as-usual forecast and a hopeful portfolio of partial solutions
    Paul R Ehrlich
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:11579-86. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint When agendas collide: human welfare and biological conservation
    Kai M A Chan
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conserv Biol 21:59-68. 2007
    ..3) We must better acknowledge the social concerns that accompany biodiversity conservation; accordingly, sometimes we must argue for conservation for biodiversity's sake, not for its direct human benefits...
  7. doi request reprint Breakdown of an ant-plant mutualism follows the loss of large herbivores from an African savanna
    Todd M Palmer
    Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Science 319:192-5. 2008
    ..These results show that large mammals maintain cooperation within a widespread symbiosis and suggest complex cascading effects of megafaunal extinction...