Ramasamy Paulmurugan

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Novel fusion protein approach for efficient high-throughput screening of small molecule-mediating protein-protein interactions in cells and living animals
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 65:7413-20. 2005
  2. pmc Cationic versus neutral microbubbles for ultrasound-mediated gene delivery in cancer
    David S Wang
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H1307, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Radiology 264:721-32. 2012
  3. pmc Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery with cationic versus neutral microbubbles: effect of DNA and microbubble dose on in vivo transfection efficiency
    Cedric M Panje
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Theranostics 2:1078-91. 2012
  4. pmc Dual-targeted contrast agent for US assessment of tumor angiogenesis in vivo
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 248:936-44. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of myoblast-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha gene transfer
    Olivier Gheysens
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 13:1124-32. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Comparison of optical bioluminescence reporter gene and superparamagnetic iron oxide MR contrast agent as cell markers for noninvasive imaging of cardiac cell transplantation
    Ian Y Chen
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 11:178-87. 2009
  7. pmc In vitro and in vivo molecular imaging of estrogen receptor α and β homo- and heterodimerization: exploration of new modes of receptor regulation
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Endocrinol 25:2029-40. 2011
  8. pmc A novel estrogen receptor intramolecular folding-based titratable transgene expression system
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, 150 East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Ther 17:1703-11. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Monitoring of the biological response to murine hindlimb ischemia with 64Cu-labeled vascular endothelial growth factor-121 positron emission tomography
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Circulation 117:915-22. 2008
  10. pmc The fate and toxicity of Raman-active silica-gold nanoparticles in mice
    Avnesh S Thakor
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Sci Transl Med 3:79ra33. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications34

  1. ncbi request reprint Novel fusion protein approach for efficient high-throughput screening of small molecule-mediating protein-protein interactions in cells and living animals
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 65:7413-20. 2005
    ..00001 nmol/L) of rapamycin. For a similar fusion system employing split-EGFP, flow cytometry analysis showed significant level of rapamycin-induced complementation...
  2. pmc Cationic versus neutral microbubbles for ultrasound-mediated gene delivery in cancer
    David S Wang
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H1307, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Radiology 264:721-32. 2012
    ..To test whether plasmid-binding cationic microbubbles (MBs) enhance ultrasound-mediated gene delivery efficiency relative to control neutral MBs in cell culture and in vivo tumors in mice...
  3. pmc Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery with cationic versus neutral microbubbles: effect of DNA and microbubble dose on in vivo transfection efficiency
    Cedric M Panje
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Theranostics 2:1078-91. 2012
    ..To assess the effect of varying microbubble (MB) and DNA doses on the overall and comparative efficiencies of ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery (UMGD) to murine hindlimb skeletal muscle using cationic versus neutral MBs...
  4. pmc Dual-targeted contrast agent for US assessment of tumor angiogenesis in vivo
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 248:936-44. 2008
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of myoblast-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha gene transfer
    Olivier Gheysens
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 13:1124-32. 2011
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Comparison of optical bioluminescence reporter gene and superparamagnetic iron oxide MR contrast agent as cell markers for noninvasive imaging of cardiac cell transplantation
    Ian Y Chen
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 11:178-87. 2009
    ....
  7. pmc In vitro and in vivo molecular imaging of estrogen receptor α and β homo- and heterodimerization: exploration of new modes of receptor regulation
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Endocrinol 25:2029-40. 2011
    ..They also probe what combinations of ERα and ERβ dimers might be the mediators of the effects of different types of ER ligands given at different doses...
  8. pmc A novel estrogen receptor intramolecular folding-based titratable transgene expression system
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, 150 East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Ther 17:1703-11. 2009
    ..The multifunctional capabilities of this system should be useful for gene therapy applications, to study ER biology, to evaluate gene regulation, ER ligand screening, and ER ligand biocharacterization in cells and living animals...
  9. doi request reprint Monitoring of the biological response to murine hindlimb ischemia with 64Cu-labeled vascular endothelial growth factor-121 positron emission tomography
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Circulation 117:915-22. 2008
    ....
  10. pmc The fate and toxicity of Raman-active silica-gold nanoparticles in mice
    Avnesh S Thakor
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Sci Transl Med 3:79ra33. 2011
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Intratumoral versus intravenous gene therapy using a transcriptionally targeted viral vector in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma rat model
    Young Il Kim
    Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 23:704-11. 2012
    ....
  12. pmc Discovery and validation of small-molecule heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors through multimodality molecular imaging in living subjects
    Carmel T Chan
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:E2476-85. 2012
    ..Our efforts demonstrated the power of coupling of HTS with multimodality molecular imaging and led to identification of Hsp90 inhibitors...
  13. pmc Combinatorial library screening for developing an improved split-firefly luciferase fragment-assisted complementation system for studying protein-protein interactions
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Anal Chem 79:2346-53. 2007
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Firefly luciferase enzyme fragment complementation for imaging in cells and living animals
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, East Wing, First Floor, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Anal Chem 77:1295-302. 2005
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and von Hippel-Lindau interaction in mice
    Clara Y H Choi
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5152, USA
    Mol Imaging 7:139-46. 2008
    ..This method represents a new approach for studying interaction of proteins involved in the regulation of protein degradation...
  16. pmc Noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α gene therapy for myocardial ischemia
    Ian Y Chen
    1 Departments of Radiology, Bioengineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
    Hum Gene Ther Methods 24:279-88. 2013
    ..The imaging techniques developed herein should be useful for further optimizing HIF-1α-VP2 therapy in preclinical models of myocardial ischemia...
  17. pmc Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 252:117-27. 2009
    ..To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning...
  18. doi request reprint Molecular imaging of the efficacy of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors in living subjects
    Carmel T Chan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 68:216-26. 2008
    ....
  19. pmc A c-Myc activation sensor-based high-throughput drug screening identifies an antineoplastic effect of nitazoxanide
    Hua Fan-Minogue
    Corresponding Author Sanjiv S Gambhir, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427
    Mol Cancer Ther 12:1896-905. 2013
    ..Our work also demonstrated the unique advantage of molecular imaging in accelerating discovery of drugs for c-Myc-targeted cancer therapy...
  20. pmc An intramolecular folding sensor for imaging estrogen receptor-ligand interactions
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, East Wing, First Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:15883-8. 2006
    ..The strategies developed can also be extended to study and image other important protein intramolecular folding systems...
  21. doi request reprint Oxidative stress mediates the effects of Raman-active gold nanoparticles in human cells
    Avnesh S Thakor
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Small 7:126-36. 2011
    ....
  22. pmc A human estrogen receptor (ER)alpha mutation with differential responsiveness to nonsteroidal ligands: novel approaches for studying mechanism of ER action
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Endocrinol 22:1552-64. 2008
    ..This system provides a model for ER-mutants that show differential ligand responsiveness to gene activation to gain insight into the phenomenon of hormone resistance observed in endocrine therapies of ER-positive breast cancers...
  23. ncbi request reprint Visualization of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter activity using a trimodality fusion reporter construct
    Parasuraman Padmanabhan
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:270-7. 2006
    ..To achieve this goal, we used radionuclide and optical methods to measure changes in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene expression in tumor cells before and after 5-fluorouracil treatment...
  24. pmc Noninvasive molecular imaging of c-Myc activation in living mice
    Hua Fan-Minogue
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:15892-7. 2010
    ....
  25. pmc A transgenic tri-modality reporter mouse
    Xinrui Yan
    Departments of Radiology, MIPS and Bio X, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e73580. 2013
    ..In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell research, tissue engineering research, and organ transplantation. ..
  26. doi request reprint US imaging of tumor angiogenesis with microbubbles targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 in mice
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 246:508-18. 2008
    ..To prospectively evaluate contrast material-enhanced ultrasonography (US) with microbubbles targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) for imaging tumor angiogenesis in two murine tumor models...
  27. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of drug-modulated protein-protein interactions in living subjects
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, James H Clark Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 64:2113-9. 2004
    ..Both are essential steps in the preclinical evaluation of candidate pharmaceutical agents targeting protein-protein interactions, including signaling pathways in cancer cells...
  28. pmc Real time dynamic imaging and current targeted therapies in the war on cancer: a new paradigm
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1501 South California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Theranostics 3:437-47. 2013
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction by TiO2 nanofibers in HeLa cells
    Kunga Mohan Ramkumar
    SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, India
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 81:324-33. 2012
    ..Our results revealed the potential mechanism of cellular effects of TiO(2)NFs...
  30. ncbi request reprint Imaging cellular receptors in breast cancers: an overview
    Thillai V Sekar
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Canary Center at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Curr Pharm Biotechnol 12:508-27. 2011
    ..This review will focus on the recent developments of imaging various cellular receptors pertaining to the growth and development of breast cancer...
  31. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of homodimeric protein-protein interactions in living subjects
    Tarik F Massoud
    The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    FASEB J 18:1105-7. 2004
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Novel bidirectional vector strategy for amplification of therapeutic and reporter gene expression
    Sunetra Ray
    Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Hum Gene Ther 15:681-90. 2004
    ..This validated approach should prove useful for the development of novel gene therapy vectors, as well as for transgenic models, allowing noninvasive imaging for indirect monitoring and amplification of target gene expression...
  33. ncbi request reprint Reporter gene imaging of protein-protein interactions in living subjects
    Tarik F Massoud
    Department of Radiology, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:31-7. 2007
    ..In the future, these innovative approaches are likely to enhance our appreciation of entire biological pathway systems and their pharmacological regulation...
  34. ncbi request reprint Loss of expression, and mutations of Smad 2 and Smad 4 in human cervical cancer
    Tessy T Maliekal
    Division of Cancer Biology, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 014, India
    Oncogene 22:4889-97. 2003
    ..The loss of expression of Smad 4 found in some cervical tumor samples was due to transcription loss rather than deletion of the gene. Our results highlight an important role for Smad 2 and Smad 4 in human cervical tumors...