Jennifer J Otten

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Effects of television viewing reduction on energy intake and expenditure in overweight and obese adults: a randomized controlled trial
    Jennifer J Otten
    Department of Nutrition, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:2109-15. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Food marketing to children through toys: response of restaurants to the first U.S. toy ordinance
    Jennifer J Otten
    Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Prev Med 42:56-60. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Removing the bedroom television set: a possible method for decreasing television viewing time in overweight and obese adults
    Katherine E Jones
    University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
    Behav Modif 34:290-8. 2010
  4. pmc The Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool: a computerized tool to assess active living environments
    Matthew P Buman
    Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Am J Prev Med 44:e41-7. 2013
  5. ncbi request reprint Food-and-beverage environment and procurement policies for healthier work environments
    Christopher D Gardner
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Nutr Rev 72:390-410. 2014
  6. ncbi request reprint Relationship between self-report and an objective measure of television-viewing time in adults
    Jennifer J Otten
    Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 18:1273-5. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. doi request reprint Effects of television viewing reduction on energy intake and expenditure in overweight and obese adults: a randomized controlled trial
    Jennifer J Otten
    Department of Nutrition, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:2109-15. 2009
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Food marketing to children through toys: response of restaurants to the first U.S. toy ordinance
    Jennifer J Otten
    Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Prev Med 42:56-60. 2012
    ..Restaurants had many different options for complying with this ordinance, such as introducing more healthful menu options, reformulating current menu items, or changing marketing or toy distribution practices...
  3. ncbi request reprint Removing the bedroom television set: a possible method for decreasing television viewing time in overweight and obese adults
    Katherine E Jones
    University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
    Behav Modif 34:290-8. 2010
    ..6 +/- 1.9 hours per day, p = .057; n = 11). This article suggested that taking the TV out of the bedroom may help to reduce overweight and obese adults can decrease their TV viewing time...
  4. pmc The Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool: a computerized tool to assess active living environments
    Matthew P Buman
    Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Am J Prev Med 44:e41-7. 2013
    ..Existing tools to assess environmental features associated with walkability are often cumbersome, require extensive training, and are not readily available for use by community residents...
  5. ncbi request reprint Food-and-beverage environment and procurement policies for healthier work environments
    Christopher D Gardner
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Nutr Rev 72:390-410. 2014
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Relationship between self-report and an objective measure of television-viewing time in adults
    Jennifer J Otten
    Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 18:1273-5. 2010
    ..Large errors were rare in this group, suggesting that a simple self-report measure of TV time may be useful for characterizing viewing behavior, although objective measurement adds precision that may be useful in certain settings...