Miriam Merad

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi In vivo manipulation of dendritic cells to induce therapeutic immunity
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Blood 99:1676-82. 2002
  2. ncbi Langerhans cells arise from monocytes in vivo
    Florent Ginhoux
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA
    Nat Immunol 7:265-73. 2006
  3. ncbi Langerhans cells renew in the skin throughout life under steady-state conditions
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Nat Immunol 3:1135-41. 2002
  4. pmc Identification of a radio-resistant and cycling dermal dendritic cell population in mice and men
    Milena Bogunovic
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Exp Med 203:2627-38. 2006
  5. ncbi Dendritic cell genealogy: a new stem or just another branch?
    Miriam Merad
    Nat Immunol 8:1199-201. 2007
  6. ncbi In vivo manipulation of dendritic cells overcomes tolerance to unmodified tumor-associated self antigens and induces potent antitumor immunity
    Fumiyoshi Okano
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    J Immunol 174:2645-52. 2005
  7. pmc Flk2+ myeloid progenitors are the main source of Langerhans cells
    Ines Mende
    Stanford Blood Center, 3373 Hillview Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Blood 107:1383-90. 2006
  8. ncbi Depletion of host Langerhans cells before transplantation of donor alloreactive T cells prevents skin graft-versus-host disease
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nat Med 10:510-7. 2004
  9. ncbi Developmental origin of interferon-alpha-producing dendritic cells from hematopoietic precursors
    Holger Karsunky
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Exp Hematol 33:173-81. 2005
  10. pmc Flt3 ligand regulates dendritic cell development from Flt3+ lymphoid and myeloid-committed progenitors to Flt3+ dendritic cells in vivo
    Holger Karsunky
    Institute for Research in Biomedicine IRB, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, CH 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland
    J Exp Med 198:305-13. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. ncbi In vivo manipulation of dendritic cells to induce therapeutic immunity
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Blood 99:1676-82. 2002
    ..Natural killer cells also contributed to tumor protection. These results show that dendritic cells can be loaded with antigen and activated, in situ, and provide the basis for dendritic cell- targeted clinical strategies...
  2. ncbi Langerhans cells arise from monocytes in vivo
    Florent Ginhoux
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA
    Nat Immunol 7:265-73. 2006
    ..These results identify Gr-1(hi) monocytes as the direct precursors for LCs in vivo and establish the importance of the CSF-1 receptor in this process...
  3. ncbi Langerhans cells renew in the skin throughout life under steady-state conditions
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Nat Immunol 3:1135-41. 2002
    ..These data indicate that under steady-state conditions, LCs are maintained locally, but inflammatory changes in the skin result in their replacement by blood-borne LC progenitors...
  4. pmc Identification of a radio-resistant and cycling dermal dendritic cell population in mice and men
    Milena Bogunovic
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Exp Med 203:2627-38. 2006
    ..Given the role of residual host tissue DCs in transplant immune reactions, these results suggest that dermal DC homeostasis may contribute to the development of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease in clinical transplantation...
  5. ncbi Dendritic cell genealogy: a new stem or just another branch?
    Miriam Merad
    Nat Immunol 8:1199-201. 2007
  6. ncbi In vivo manipulation of dendritic cells overcomes tolerance to unmodified tumor-associated self antigens and induces potent antitumor immunity
    Fumiyoshi Okano
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    J Immunol 174:2645-52. 2005
    ..These findings demonstrate that unmodified tumor-associated self Ags can be targeted to DCs in vivo to induce potent systemic antitumor immunity...
  7. pmc Flk2+ myeloid progenitors are the main source of Langerhans cells
    Ines Mende
    Stanford Blood Center, 3373 Hillview Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Blood 107:1383-90. 2006
    ..These results indicate that LCs are derived mainly from myeloid progenitors and are dependent on Flt3-ligand for their development...
  8. ncbi Depletion of host Langerhans cells before transplantation of donor alloreactive T cells prevents skin graft-versus-host disease
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nat Med 10:510-7. 2004
    ....
  9. ncbi Developmental origin of interferon-alpha-producing dendritic cells from hematopoietic precursors
    Holger Karsunky
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Exp Hematol 33:173-81. 2005
    ....
  10. pmc Flt3 ligand regulates dendritic cell development from Flt3+ lymphoid and myeloid-committed progenitors to Flt3+ dendritic cells in vivo
    Holger Karsunky
    Institute for Research in Biomedicine IRB, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, CH 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland
    J Exp Med 198:305-13. 2003
    ....
  11. pmc Induction of potent antitumor immunity by in situ targeting of intratumoral DCs
    Katsuyoshi Furumoto
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 113:774-83. 2004
    ....
  12. ncbi Blood monocyte subsets differentially give rise to CD103+ and CD103- pulmonary dendritic cell populations
    Claudia Jakubzick
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Icahn Research Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Immunol 180:3019-27. 2008
    ..Overall, these data demonstrate that the two circulating subsets of monocytes give rise to distinct tissue DC populations...
  13. pmc Blood-derived dermal langerin+ dendritic cells survey the skin in the steady state
    Florent Ginhoux
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Exp Med 204:3133-46. 2007
    ..We propose that this is an important and previously unappreciated element of immunosurveillance that needs to be taken into account in the design of novel vaccine strategies...
  14. ncbi The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 causes tissue retention by inhibiting the entry of peripheral tissue T lymphocytes into afferent lymphatics
    Levi G Ledgerwood
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA
    Nat Immunol 9:42-53. 2008
    ..Thus, the increased sphingosine 1-phosphate present in inflamed peripheral tissues may induce T cell retention and suppress T cell egress...
  15. pmc Immature monocytes acquire antigens from other cells in the bone marrow and present them to T cells after maturing in the periphery
    Frank Tacke
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Icahn Research Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Exp Med 203:583-97. 2006
    ..These data reveal that immature monocytes unexpectedly sample antigen from the bone marrow environment and that they can present these antigens after they leave the bone marrow...
  16. ncbi B cell-driven lymphangiogenesis in inflamed lymph nodes enhances dendritic cell mobilization
    Veronique Angeli
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA
    Immunity 24:203-15. 2006
    ..Knowledge that DC migration from the periphery is augmented by B cell-dependent signals reveals new potential strategies to increase DC migration during vaccination...
  17. ncbi Ontogeny of Lagerhans cells and graft versus host disease
    Miriam Merad
    Center for Gene Therapy, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1425 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 560:115-23. 2005
  18. pmc The receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 is required for dendritic cell development in peripheral lymphoid tissues
    Claudia Waskow
    Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA
    Nat Immunol 9:676-83. 2008
    ..In contrast, Flt3 was essential to the regulation of homeostatic DC development in the spleen, where it was needed to maintain normal numbers of DCs by controlling their division in the periphery...
  19. ncbi Dendritic cells in transplantation and immune-based therapies
    James W Young
    Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 13:23-32. 2007
    ..The use of defined DC subtypes to stimulate both innate and adaptive immunity, either in combination or in a prime-boost vaccine sequence, may prove most useful clinically by harnessing both effector cell compartments...
  20. ncbi Dendritic cell homeostasis and trafficking in transplantation
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical School, 1425 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA
    Trends Immunol 28:353-9. 2007
    ..Here, we review studies on DC homeostasis and trafficking after transplantation, and examine the role of the host and graft DC in post-transplant immune responses. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of these studies...
  21. doi Langerhans cells at the interface of medicine, science, and industry
    Miriam Merad
    Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 128:251-5. 2008