Michael Longaker

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Integration of multiple signaling pathways determines differences in the osteogenic potential and tissue regeneration of neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived calvarial bones
    Kshemendra Senarath-Yapa
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Mol Sci 14:5978-97. 2013
  2. pmc Regenerative medicine: a surgeon's perspective
    Michael T Longaker
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Pediatr Surg 45:11-7; discussion 17-8. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint Proposition 71 and CIRM--assessing the return on investment
    Michael T Longaker
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 25:513-21. 2007
  4. doi request reprint Presidential address: leadership, teamwork, and SUS brand extension
    Michael T Longaker
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Surgery 144:109-18. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Regenerative medicine: the next frontier
    Matthew D Kwan
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Transplantation 86:206-7. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Equibiaxial tensile strain affects calvarial osteoblast biology
    Kenton D Fong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 14:348-55. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Mechanical load initiates hypertrophic scar formation through decreased cellular apoptosis
    Shahram Aarabi
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    FASEB J 21:3250-61. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Craniofacial bone tissue engineering
    Derrick C Wan
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Dent Clin North Am 50:175-90, vii. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Cyclophilin C-associated protein is up-regulated during wound healing
    Wuyi Kong
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Physiol 210:153-60. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Cyclophilin C-associated protein is a mediator for fibronectin fragment-induced matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression
    Wuyi Kong
    Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:55334-40. 2004

Detail Information

Publications80

  1. pmc Integration of multiple signaling pathways determines differences in the osteogenic potential and tissue regeneration of neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived calvarial bones
    Kshemendra Senarath-Yapa
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Mol Sci 14:5978-97. 2013
    ..Furthermore, we explore recent studies which have provided a tantalizing insight into way these pathways interact, with evidence accumulating for certain transcription factors, such as Runx2, acting as a nexus for cross-talk...
  2. pmc Regenerative medicine: a surgeon's perspective
    Michael T Longaker
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Pediatr Surg 45:11-7; discussion 17-8. 2010
    ..The question is, "why do we not regenerate?" and "why do we always heal with either a 'normal amount of scarring' or, approximately 15% of the time, with a pathologic amount of scarring (hypertrophic scar or keloid)?"..
  3. ncbi request reprint Proposition 71 and CIRM--assessing the return on investment
    Michael T Longaker
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 25:513-21. 2007
    ..state coffers to sell $3 billion in bonds to fund the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) with the expectation of health and financial benefits, what benchmarks should be used to measure the initiative's success?..
  4. doi request reprint Presidential address: leadership, teamwork, and SUS brand extension
    Michael T Longaker
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Surgery 144:109-18. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Regenerative medicine: the next frontier
    Matthew D Kwan
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Transplantation 86:206-7. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Equibiaxial tensile strain affects calvarial osteoblast biology
    Kenton D Fong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 14:348-55. 2003
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Mechanical load initiates hypertrophic scar formation through decreased cellular apoptosis
    Shahram Aarabi
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    FASEB J 21:3250-61. 2007
    ..We conclude that mechanical loading early in the proliferative phase of wound healing produces hypertrophic scars by inhibiting cellular apoptosis through an Akt-dependent mechanism...
  8. ncbi request reprint Craniofacial bone tissue engineering
    Derrick C Wan
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Dent Clin North Am 50:175-90, vii. 2006
    ..By laying this foundation, future directions for craniofacial distraction and cell-based bone engineering have emerged with great promise for the advancement of clinical practice...
  9. ncbi request reprint Cyclophilin C-associated protein is up-regulated during wound healing
    Wuyi Kong
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Physiol 210:153-60. 2007
    ..Our data indicates that CyCAP is regulated by IFNgamma and may function on immune defense in macrophages, lymphocytes, dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes during wound healing...
  10. ncbi request reprint Cyclophilin C-associated protein is a mediator for fibronectin fragment-induced matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression
    Wuyi Kong
    Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:55334-40. 2004
    ..Our data are the first to demonstrate that deletion of CyC-AP can abolish fibronectin fragment-induced MMP-13 expression through an unknown mechanism. CyC-AP is an important factor for the regulation of MMP-13 expression...
  11. ncbi request reprint Increased angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor during scarless repair
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 115:204-12. 2005
    ..VEGF expression quickly elevates during scarless compared with scarring repair, which likely contributes to the more rapid scarless fetal repair rate. Similar numbers of new ves-sels are formed during scarless and scarring fetal repair...
  12. ncbi request reprint Fetal and adult fibroblasts have similar TGF-beta-mediated, Smad-dependent signaling pathways
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Tissue Regeneration Laboratory, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 117:2277-83. 2006
    ..Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), Smad3, and Smad7 are TGF-beta target genes. Expression of these targets was quantitated after TGF-beta1 and -beta3 stimulation of fetal and adult fibroblasts...
  13. ncbi request reprint Wnt-4 expression is increased in fibroblasts after TGF-beta1 stimulation and during fetal and postnatal wound repair
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 117:2297-301. 2006
    ..Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 has high expression during healing with scar formation. Whether TGF-beta1 directly influences Wnt-4 expression in fetal or postnatal fibroblasts has not been examined...
  14. pmc Fgf-9 is required for angiogenesis and osteogenesis in long bone repair
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:11853-8. 2010
    ..Moreover, this study further supports the embryonic phenotype previously observed in the developing limb, thus promoting the concept that healing processes in adult organisms may recapitulate embryonic skeletal development...
  15. ncbi request reprint Isolation and characterization of posterofrontal/sagittal suture mesenchymal cells in vitro
    Yue Xu
    Children s Surgical Research Program and Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 119:819-29. 2007
    ..To study the cellular process of suture fusion, the authors isolated and studied suture-derived mesenchymal cells...
  16. pmc Origin matters: differences in embryonic tissue origin and Wnt signaling determine the osteogenic potential and healing capacity of frontal and parietal calvarial bones
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 25:1680-94. 2010
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Transient changes in oxygen tension inhibit osteogenic differentiation and Runx2 expression in osteoblasts
    Ali Salim
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:40007-16. 2004
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Tools and techniques for craniofacial tissue engineering
    Stephen M Warren
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng 9:187-200. 2003
    ..In this review, we highlight the major gene- and cell-based preclinical tools and techniques that are currently being developed to solve common craniofacial problems...
  19. ncbi request reprint Mesenchymal cells for skeletal tissue engineering
    Bethany J Slater
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Expert Opin Biol Ther 8:885-93. 2008
    ..Skeletal defects represent a significant socioeconomic burden to the US healthcare system. Current options for reconstructing osseous deficits have shortcomings...
  20. ncbi request reprint Mechanical strain affects dura mater biological processes: implications for immature calvarial healing
    Kenton D Fong
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 112:1312-27. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that mechanical strain can induce changes in dura mater biological processes and gene expression that may play important roles in coordinating the growth and healing of the neonatal calvaria...
  21. ncbi request reprint From scarless fetal wounds to keloids: molecular studies in wound healing
    George P Yang
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 11:411-8. 2003
    ..In this article, we discuss new findings in scarless fetal repair, angiogenesis in wound healing, and keloid pathogenesis. This serves to highlight the advances that have been made and also how much remains to be understood...
  22. ncbi request reprint Matrix metalloproteinases and the ontogeny of scarless repair: the other side of the wound healing balance
    Ziv M Peled
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 110:801-11. 2002
    ..Furthermore, our data suggest that the differential expression of gelatinase B (MMP-9) may be mediated by the fetal fibroblasts themselves...
  23. doi request reprint Molecular mechanisms of FGF-2 inhibitory activity in the osteogenic context of mouse adipose-derived stem cells (mASCs)
    Natalina Quarto
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Bone 42:1040-52. 2008
    ..Moreover, the present study also indicates that differences exist between mouse and human ASCs in relationship to FGF-2 activity in the osteogenic context...
  24. ncbi request reprint Methods for investigating fetal tissue repair
    Ziv M Peled
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Med 78:149-59. 2003
  25. ncbi request reprint An in vivo mouse excisional wound model of scarless healing
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 117:2292-6. 2006
    ..The purpose of this study was to develop a reproducible murine model of fetal scarless wound healing...
  26. ncbi request reprint Regional dura mater differentially regulates osteoblast gene expression
    Stephen M Warren
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 14:363-70. 2003
    ..These data support an osteoinductive role for suture-derived dural cells in vitro that may have implications for suture biology in vivo...
  27. ncbi request reprint Early-gestation fetal scarless wounds have less lysyl oxidase expression
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Tissue Regeneration Laboratory, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 118:1125-9; discussion 1130-1. 2006
    ..Lysyl oxidase cross-links collagen and elastin. Because cross-linking likely influences collagen architecture, the authors compared lysyl oxidase expression during scarless and scarring fetal dermal wound repair...
  28. ncbi request reprint Epithelial-mesenchymal transition occurs after epidermal development in mouse skin
    Wuyi Kong
    Children s Surgical Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Exp Cell Res 312:3959-68. 2006
    ..Our data are the first in vivo evidence that EMT occurs during mouse skin development. Dermal cells are derived from EMT and other origins, including blood, during skin development...
  29. ncbi request reprint Progress and potential for regenerative medicine
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Med 58:299-312. 2007
    ....
  30. doi request reprint Proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and fgf-2 modulation of posterofrontal/sagittal suture-derived mesenchymal cells in vitro
    Aaron W James
    Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 122:53-63. 2008
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint The BMP antagonist noggin regulates cranial suture fusion
    Stephen M Warren
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Nature 422:625-9. 2003
    ..Since noggin misexpression prevents cranial suture fusion in vitro and in vivo, we suggest that syndromic fgfr-mediated craniosynostoses may be the result of inappropriate downregulation of noggin expression...
  32. ncbi request reprint Mammalian fetal organ regeneration
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol 93:83-100. 2005
    ..Identification of more key genes involved in skin regeneration may have implications in adult skin wounds and repair in other organ systems...
  33. ncbi request reprint Molecular and cellular characterization of mouse calvarial osteoblasts derived from neural crest and paraxial mesoderm
    Yue Xu
    Children s Surgical Research Program and Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 120:1783-95. 2007
    ..Cranial skeletogenic mesenchyme is derived from two distinct embryonic sources: mesoderm and cranial neural crest. Previous studies have focused on molecular and cellular differences of juvenile and adult osteoblasts...
  34. doi request reprint Wound repair and regeneration
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Nature 453:314-21. 2008
    ..Knowledge gained from studying such organisms might help to unlock latent regenerative pathways in humans, which would change medical practice as much as the introduction of antibiotics did in the twentieth century...
  35. pmc Blood-derived small Dot cells reduce scar in wound healing
    Wuyi Kong
    Children s Surgical Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Exp Cell Res 314:1529-39. 2008
    ..Our results indicate that Dot cells are a group of previously unidentified cells that have strong wound healing effect. The mechanism of scarless wound healing in fetal skin is due to the presence of a large number of Dot cells...
  36. doi request reprint Major deficit in the number of underrepresented minority academic surgeons persists
    Paris D Butler
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Ann Surg 248:704-11. 2008
    ..S. surgical residents and faculty could provide outstanding information, yielding insight into a possible deficit that, if rectified by the medical education system, could change the face of surgery and the entire health care system...
  37. doi request reprint Ethnic diversity remains scarce in academic plastic and reconstructive surgery
    Paris D Butler
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:1618-27. 2009
    ..Investigating the demographics of the U.S. plastic surgery residents and faculty can bring attention to a deficit that, if corrected, could benefit the field and improve the entire health care system...
  38. ncbi request reprint Highlights of the proceedings from the 10th International Congress of the International Society of Craniofacial Surgery
    Herman Peter Lorenz
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 15:533-7. 2004
  39. doi request reprint Different endogenous threshold levels of Fibroblast Growth Factor-ligands determine the healing potential of frontal and parietal bones
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Bone 47:281-94. 2010
    ..The present study thereby opens new avenues for translational medicine...
  40. pmc Human melanoma-initiating cells express neural crest nerve growth factor receptor CD271
    Alexander D Boiko
    Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94304 5542, USA
    Nature 466:133-7. 2010
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint New strategies for craniofacial repair and replacement: a brief review
    Kenton D Fong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 14:333-9. 2003
    ..In addition, we discuss the importance of studying endogenous models of tissue induction and present some of the current in vitro and in vivo approaches to growing complex tissues/organs for craniofacial reconstruction...
  42. ncbi request reprint New developments in pediatric plastic surgery research
    Randall P Nacamuli
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Clin Plast Surg 32:123-36, ix-x. 2005
    ..Although the last decade has seen a dramatic acceleration in research related to pediatric plastic surgery, the next 10 years will no doubt lead to novel treatment strategies with improved clinical outcomes...
  43. ncbi request reprint FGF-2 acts through an ERK1/2 intracellular pathway to affect osteoblast differentiation
    Jason A Spector
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 115:838-52. 2005
    ..Together, these findings offer new insight into the mechanisms by which FGF-2 modulates osteoblast biology...
  44. doi request reprint Differential activation of canonical Wnt signaling determines cranial sutures fate: a novel mechanism for sagittal suture craniosynostosis
    Bjorn Behr
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Dev Biol 344:922-40. 2010
    ..We propose that regulation of canonical Wnt signaling is of crucial importance during the physiological patterning of PF and SAG sutures. Importantly, dysregulation of this pathway may lead to craniosynostosis...
  45. doi request reprint Cyclophilin C-associated protein/Mac-2 binding protein colocalizes with calnexin and regulates the expression of tissue transglutaminase
    Wuyi Kong
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Cell Physiol 223:151-7. 2010
    ..Our data give novel evidence that CyCAP regulates the post-translational modification of tTG through its colocalization with calnexin in ER...
  46. pmc Retinoic acid enhances osteogenesis in cranial suture-derived mesenchymal cells: potential mechanisms of retinoid-induced craniosynostosis
    Aaron W James
    Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 125:1352-61. 2010
    ..The authors used the culture of mouse cranial suture-derived mesenchymal cells to probe the potential cellular mechanisms of this teratogen to better elucidate mechanisms of retinoid-induced suture fusion...
  47. ncbi request reprint Sutural bone deposition rate and strain magnitude during cranial development
    James H Henderson
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bone 34:271-80. 2004
    ....
  48. ncbi request reprint Stem cells: review and update
    Karl G Sylvester
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif, USA
    Arch Surg 139:93-9. 2004
    ..A basic understanding of stem cell biology is paramount to stay informed of this emerging technology and the national debate...
  49. doi request reprint Scarless fetal wound healing: a basic science review
    Barrett J Larson
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 126:1172-80. 2010
    ..These differences may have important implications in scarless wound repair...
  50. doi request reprint Silva et al: Repair of cranial bone defects with calcium phosphate ceramic implant or autogenous bone graft
    Raimy R Amasha
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 19:675-7. 2008
  51. ncbi request reprint Fetal wound healing current perspectives
    Catherine Dang
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, CHS 73 060, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Clin Plast Surg 30:13-23. 2003
    ..Thus, further investigation into the mechanisms underlying scarless repair is crucial in order to devise more effective therapies for scar reduction and the treatment of cirrhosis, scleroderma, and other diseases of excessive fibrosis...
  52. pmc Paracrine interaction between adipose-derived stromal cells and cranial suture-derived mesenchymal cells
    Aaron W James
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 126:806-21. 2010
    ..Various reports have previously examined the unique in vitro attributes of suture-derived mesenchymal cells; this study sought to extend those findings...
  53. ncbi request reprint Cranial suture biology
    Kelly A Lenton
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 66:287-328. 2005
  54. ncbi request reprint Factors in the fracture microenvironment induce primary osteoblast angiogenic cytokine production
    Pierre J Bouletreau
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 110:139-48. 2002
    ..It is postulated that similar mechanisms may occur in vivo, at a site of skeletal injury, to induce neoangiogenesis and promote fracture repair...
  55. pmc Estrogen/estrogen receptor alpha signaling in mouse posterofrontal cranial suture fusion
    Aaron W James
    Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e7120. 2009
    ..Estrogens are associated with growth plate fusion of endochondral bones. In the following study, we explore the previously unknown significance of estrogen/estrogen receptor signaling in cranial suture biology...
  56. doi request reprint Identification of differentially regulated genes in fetal wounds during regenerative repair
    Amy S Colwell
    Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 16:450-9. 2008
    ..Our data suggest that multiple gene products may be necessary for the coordination of skin regeneration during wound repair in the fetus...
  57. ncbi request reprint Increased transcriptional response to mechanical strain in keloid fibroblasts due to increased focal adhesion complex formation
    Zhen Wang
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford 94305, and Palo Alto VA Health Care System, California, USA
    J Cell Physiol 206:510-7. 2006
    ..This may be one molecular mechanism for the development of keloids...
  58. ncbi request reprint Age-dependent properties and quasi-static strain in the rat sagittal suture
    James H Henderson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025 4038, USA
    J Biomech 38:2294-301. 2005
    ..The findings show that during development the rat sagittal suture, as a structure, changes significantly and is exposed to quasi-static tensile strain in vivo due to intracranial pressure...
  59. ncbi request reprint FGF-2 stimulation affects calvarial osteoblast biology: quantitative analysis of nine genes important for cranial suture biology by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction
    Jonathan A Mathy
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 112:528-39. 2003
    ..These analyses provide a "snapshot" of several important genes involved in suture fusion that is more inclusive and quantitative than that which has been previously reported...
  60. ncbi request reprint Age-related changes in the biomolecular mechanisms of calvarial osteoblast biology affect fibroblast growth factor-2 signaling and osteogenesis
    Catherine M Cowan
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:32005-13. 2003
    ..Collectively, these findings begin to explain why juvenile, but not adult, osteoblasts successfully heal calvarial defects...
  61. ncbi request reprint Complex epithelial-mesenchymal interactions modulate transforming growth factor-beta expression in keloid-derived cells
    Wei Xia
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical School, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 12:546-56. 2004
    ..These data suggest that keloid pathogenesis may result from both an increased TGF-beta production and activation by the keloid keratinocyte, and elevated TGF-beta expression, utilization, and signaling in keloid fibroblasts...
  62. ncbi request reprint FGF-2 inhibits osteogenesis in mouse adipose tissue-derived stromal cells and sustains their proliferative and osteogenic potential state
    Natalina Quarto
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Tissue Eng 12:1405-18. 2006
    ..These FGF-2 functional characteristics may assist with cell selection and enrichment for the purpose of bone tissue engineering...
  63. pmc Analysis of the material properties of early chondrogenic differentiated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) using an in vitro three-dimensional micromass culture system
    Yue Xu
    Pediatric Surgical Research Program and Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 359:311-6. 2007
    ..These data suggest that the 3D micromass culture system represents an in vitro model of early chondrogenesis with dynamic cell signaling interactions associated with the mechanical properties of chondrocyte differentiation...
  64. pmc Calcium-based nanoparticles accelerate skin wound healing
    Kenichiro Kawai
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e27106. 2011
    ..In the present study, we synthesized pH-sensitive calcium-based nanoparticles and investigated their ability to enhance cutaneous wound repair...
  65. doi request reprint Optimization of flexor tendon tissue engineering with a cyclic strain bioreactor
    Jonathan Riboh
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    J Hand Surg Am 33:1388-96. 2008
    ....
  66. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of murine cranial suture patency mediated by a dominant negative transforming growth factor-beta receptor adenovirus
    HanJoon M Song
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 113:1685-97. 2004
    ..Collectively, these data strongly suggest that AdDN-TbetaRII maintains posterior frontal patency, in part by altering early events in de novo bone formation, including cellular proliferation and early extracellular matrix production...
  67. ncbi request reprint Synchronous activation of ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways is required for collagen and extracellular matrix production in keloids
    Ivor J Lim
    Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, National University of Singapore, 5, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074
    J Biol Chem 278:40851-8. 2003
    ..These pathways additionally appear to affect the side chain attachments of fibronectin. Modulation of these pathways may suggest a direction for keloid therapy...
  68. ncbi request reprint In utero surgery for cleft lip/palate: minimizing the "Ripple Effect" of scarring
    H Peter Lorenz
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 14:504-11. 2003
    ..The rationale for a prenatal treatment approach to the patient with cleft lip/palate and the experimental evidence to support in utero intervention are discussed in this article...
  69. ncbi request reprint Applications of a mouse model of calvarial healing: differences in regenerative abilities of juveniles and adults
    Oliver O Aalami
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 114:713-20. 2004
    ....
  70. ncbi request reprint The molecular biology of distraction osteogenesis
    Pierre J Bouletreau
    Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Lyon, France
    J Craniomaxillofac Surg 30:1-11. 2002
    ..It is believed that understanding the biomolecular mechanisms that mediate membranous distraction osteogenesis may guide the development of targeted strategies designed to improve distraction osteogenesis and accelerate bone healing...
  71. ncbi request reprint Co-culture of osteoblasts with immature dural cells causes an increased rate and degree of osteoblast differentiation
    Jason A Spector
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 109:631-42; discussion 643-4. 2002
    ..g., transforming growth factor beta 1 and fibroblast growth factor 2), and they may begin to explain why immature animals and infants with intact dura mater can reossify large calvarial defects...
  72. pmc Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of collagen scaffolding patterns in cranial sutures
    Stephen M Warren
    Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 19:198-203. 2008
    ..8% versus 60.6%; P < 0.05). Moreover, the pathologically fusing suture contained a highly organized mineralizing orthogonal collagen lattice. This is the first analysis of collagen patterns in patent and fusing cranial sutures...
  73. ncbi request reprint Transforming growth factor-beta, Smad, and collagen expression patterns in fetal and adult keratinocytes
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Tissue Regeneration Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 119:852-7. 2007
    ....
  74. ncbi request reprint Fetal wound healing: current biology
    Kelli M Bullard
    Department of Surgery, Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Minnesota, Mayo Mail Code 450, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
    World J Surg 27:54-61. 2003
    ..An intensive research effort has focused on unraveling the mechanisms that underlie scarless fetal wound healing in an attempt to improve the quality of healing in both children and adults...
  75. doi request reprint Advances in science and technology: impact on craniofacial surgery
    Matthew D Kwan
    J Craniofac Surg 19:1136-9. 2008
  76. ncbi request reprint Skin wounds in the MRL/MPJ mouse heal with scar
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Research Laboratory, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 14:81-90. 2006
    ..In conclusion, in contrast to wound healing in the ear, MRL/MpJ mouse dorsal cutaneous wounds heal similarly to C57bl/6 and Balb/c mice with dermal collagen deposition and scar formation...
  77. pmc Relationships between tissue dilatation and differentiation in distraction osteogenesis
    Elise F Morgan
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Mechanical Engineering Department, Durand Building, Room 215, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Matrix Biol 25:94-103. 2006
    ..These results are used to suggest experiments that can provide a more mechanistic understanding of the role of tissue dilatation in bone regeneration...
  78. ncbi request reprint The osteogenic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal cells is maintained with aging
    Yun ying Shi
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 116:1686-96. 2005
    ....
  79. ncbi request reprint Keratinocytes modulate fetal and postnatal fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta and Smad expression in co-culture
    Amy S Colwell
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Children s Surgical Research Program, Tissue Regeneration Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 119:1440-5. 2007
    ..The authors hypothesized that keratinocytes may differentially modulate expression of key growth factors expressed during wound healing in fetal and postnatal fibroblasts...
  80. ncbi request reprint Mechanobiology of mandibular distraction osteogenesis: experimental analyses with a rat model
    Elizabeth G Loboa
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Bone 34:336-43. 2004
    ..Taken together, our interpretation of these data is that daily distractions cause daily tissue damage which triggers new mesenchymal tissue formation...

Research Grants31

  1. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF CALVARIAL HEALING
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Finally, we will determine the origin of the osteoblasts that contribute to calvarial re-ossification. ..
  2. Planning the Stanford Center for Translational Medicine
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..This planning phase will form the strong foundation of a successful SoM effort resulting in greatly expanded efforts in the emerging field of Translational Medicine. ..
  3. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF CRANIAL SUTURE FUSION
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Finally, pathologically fusing sutures will be rescued with perinatal gene therapy using a Noggin adenovirus. ..
  4. Interdisciplinary Regenerative Medicine Training Program(RMI)
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  5. Interdisciplinary Regenerative Medicine Training Program(RMI)
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  6. Cellular and Molecular Biology of Keloid Pathogenesis
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In this way, we hope to create an in vivo analog to our in vitro coculture model. The central hypothesis to be tested in this proposal is that KHKs interact with KHFs in promoting keloid pathogenesis..
  7. DISTRACTION OSTEOGENESIS--ENDOGENOUS TISSUE ENGINEERING
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The long term objective of this work is to gain insight into the mechanisms that regulate osteogenesis in general and, mandibular DO in particular, in order to advance the discipline of osseous tissue engineering. ..
  8. MECHANISM OF CRANIAL SUTURE FUSION & PATENCY--TGF-B & FG
    Michael Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The long-term objective of this work is to understand the mechanisms underlying sutural fusion so we can develop biomolecular strategies to treat or reverse prematurely fused sutures non- surgically. ..
  9. Regional differences in neural crest and mesodermal derived calvarial bone healin
    Michael T Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Identification of skull bones with superior healing potential provides insight into novel strategies that can be employed to regenerate, rather than reconstruct, skull bones. ..